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View Full Version : Need info on Harlequin Rasboras



Lauren B.
02-18-2007, 04:34 AM
Hi all,

I saw some Harlequin Rasboras today and thought they were really cute. Can anyone tell me some info I'd like on them?....

Are they non-aggressive? I couldn't stand having cannibals in my tank!

How big do they grow? I was going to get neon tetras, but if the rasboras are small, maybe I could do a school of them instead.

How many could I have in a 6-gal tank? I'd rather have a school of little tiny fish than only one or two bigger ones.

Do they breed easily? Very important because I DON'T want any babies!

Are they mid-range/middle swimmers? I don't want to have to sit on the floor to look at them.


Any other info you think might help me would be appreciated! Thanks!:1luvu:

cocoa_pleco
02-18-2007, 04:45 AM
not sure.

Type in harlequin rasbora in google

Chrona
02-18-2007, 05:42 AM
Are they non-aggressive? I couldn't stand having cannibals in my tank!

Non agressive

How big do they grow? I was going to get neon tetras, but if the rasboras are small, maybe I could do a school of them instead.

1.5-2 inches eventually. They grow slower in a 6 gallon

How many could I have in a 6-gal tank? I'd rather have a school of little tiny fish than only one or two bigger ones.

4, maybe 5 max.

Do they breed easily? Very important because I DON'T want any babies!

Not sure if they breed easily, but the eggs/fry require special care, ie certain periods of darkness, micro food etc, so it is highly unlikely any will make it to adulthood

Are they mid-range/middle swimmers? I don't want to have to sit on the floor to look at them.

Yes

Lady Hobbs
02-18-2007, 01:15 PM
I have the red tail rasboras and they're some of my favorite fish. Very hardy and bother no one. I like them much better than danio's and they are bigger. About 2 inches. All they want to do is play and swim.

Willyleigh
02-18-2007, 06:18 PM
I don't know if any of you have heard of Galaxy Rasboras, they are very small about 2-3cm max so you could fit many in a small tank and they are gorgeous fish, the problem is they are very expensive as they have been newly discovered, 5-7 over here in england, but in a small tank you could build up a nice shoal for not that much money.

Willyleigh
02-19-2007, 10:10 PM
Here is a picture (http://www.tropicalfish4u.co.uk/acatalog/copy_of_Harlequin_Rasbora.html) for anyone who is interested.

You would find them irresistible if you saw them in real life.

Lady Hobbs
02-19-2007, 11:58 PM
WOW. A tankful of those would really be pretty.

These are the rasboras I mentioned in another post that I loved and couldn't find so thank you, thank you.


They've only recently been discovered so will be higher now as they are a new discovery.

Lauren B.
02-20-2007, 06:14 AM
Holy crap....those little guys are cute! I see why they're called "Galaxy". Their spots look like the stars in the Milky Way.

Lauren B.
02-20-2007, 06:25 AM
I went to an aquarium shop I'd never previously been to today. It seemed very nice and clean, but the lady that owned it kept pushing me toward White Clouds for my first fish. She just kept telling me that neons and rasboras and rummynoses (which I considered as well) would not do well in a new tank, even though I explained to her that I was properly cycling my tank and I didn't want to sacrifice any fish. I don't think she believed me or believed that a tank could be cycled without any starter/suicide fish. And then in the same breath she told me after I added the White Clouds, I could add in 6 or 7 of whatever fish I chose....INTO MY 6 GALLON TANK! What's with the mentality that only White Clouds were acceptable, but after that, I could crowd the crap out of my tank with whatever! Is that annoying or what?

minabird
02-20-2007, 01:29 PM
Sounds like she was being a stereotypical salesperson and not listening to your needs and just pushing you to buy fish you didn't want so you would come back and buy the fish that you did want to get in the first place. If you're tank is fully cycled, you shouldn't have any problems getting harlequins as the first fish for your tank, just stock it slowly. Start off with a pair and watch out for ammonia and nitrite spikes. After a week or 2 of 0 ammonia and nitrites, get another pair.

*Sarah*
02-20-2007, 03:17 PM
One guy at my LFS hadn't ever heard of fishless cycling, and he also didn't believe that it was possible, and said that he thought that ammonia would kill the plants I was buying. I tried to explain to him that the ammonia replaces fish wastes and actually fertilizes the plants, but he was an idiot and didn't listen to me. Then I was at the same store and a younger guy, well, kid actually, that was working there knew all about fishless cycling and helped me answer some questions.

AND, those Galaxy Rasboras are BEAUTIFUL. They would look SOOOO good in my 10 gal planted tank:1luvu: but I bet they'd be hard to get a hold of since they were just discovered, and my water wouldn't be best for them since I have hard water :( Oh well, I think I'm going to get some Silkytailed Guppies.

Lauren B.
02-21-2007, 11:11 PM
Then I was at the same store and a younger guy, well, kid actually, that was working there knew all about fishless cycling and helped me answer some questions.

Maybe it's just the people I know, but it seems a lot of younger people are actually smarter than adults. I've found that over the years a lot of adults that I've encountered need things explained to them over and over, and in different ways, to get what you're saying. And then most of the time I doubt that they've really understood, and it just seems that you're never on the same wave length with these people. They have tunnel vision and they can't fathom anything out of their small realm of existence.

A good example is a family member named Cecile. While her husband is maybe 2 points higher in IQ, Cecile is a freaking moron. I can explain something to her 10 times and in 10 different ways, and that little lightbulb-over-your-head never lights up. I don't know if she's not listening, or preoccupied, or just so stubborn that she holds the belief that if-it-hasn't-happened-to-her-it-must-not-be-true. On the flipside, she has 2 kids aged 14 and 18 who are a hundred times smarter than the parents. These kids are so intuitive that many times they have practically finished my sentences and thoughts. When I speak to these kids, they respond in a way that tells me they got the exact meaning of my comment and that they're totally in the same mindframe. I don't know how these smart kids came from such retarded parents. I dunno, maybe the idiodicy skips a generation.

*Sarah*
02-22-2007, 01:11 AM
I think a lot of it is due to the fact that kids just HAVE to know more at a younger age these days in order to succeed. The curriculum in schools is SO much more complicated than even when I was in school, I can't imagine what it will be like for kids 30 years from now.

Chrona
02-22-2007, 01:12 AM
I think a lot of it is due to the fact that kids just HAVE to know more at a younger age these days in order to succeed. The curriculum in schools is SO much more complicated than even when I was in school, I can't imagine what it will be like for kids 30 years from now.

Kids won't need to go to school. Information will be downloaded and imprinted into their brain.... :)

xoolooxunny
02-22-2007, 03:09 AM
the rasboras that you want do NOT breed easily, in fact they are rather difficult to breed. you need certain broad leaf plants for the eggs to stick to, slightly warmer water temperatures, and at least 2 males for every female. the dance they perform before mating is pretty funny to watch, and you have to take them out of the tank right away after laying the eggs because they will eat the fry after they hatch in 24 hours.... Case in point...dont worry about them reproducing in your normal tank setup. They are very pretty to have in the tank and stay towards the middle/top so you can always see them. they like a high 6 or a neutral ph, but i have mine in a 7.6 and they adjusted well. keep them in a group of at least for or 5 to keep them happy. If you want to sex them you can look at the black wedge on the posterior area. If the wedge is more rounded instead of straight, its a male. hope this helps, and i hope you decide to get them, give them good light and a variety of flake food and their colors will flourish!

Lauren B.
02-22-2007, 10:39 PM
Thanks for that info, xooloo. I've read about the visual differences in the rasbora gender in a few different websites, but honestly I can't tell the difference! I was at Petsmart earlier today and noticed a tank of rasboras. I tried to tell the differences in gender but all their black spots looked the same shape to me. Maybe by the time I'm ready to stock my tank an aquarium professional can do this better than I can. Regardless, I'm glad they don't breed easily, so these little guys may be a good match for me.

xoolooxunny
02-22-2007, 10:49 PM
I can't really sex them until I have them in my tank for awhile. They get better care in a home aquarium, and better food. Also, most of the time they are still young at the store, and have some maturing to do, so keep that watchful eye.

Willyleigh
02-25-2007, 06:33 PM
Maybe it's just the people I know, but it seems a lot of younger people are actually smarter than adults. I've found that over the years a lot of adults that I've encountered need things explained to them over and over, and in different ways, to get what you're saying. And then most of the time I doubt that they've really understood, and it just seems that you're never on the same wave length with these people. They have tunnel vision and they can't fathom anything out of their small realm of existence.

A good example is a family member named Cecile. While her husband is maybe 2 points higher in IQ, Cecile is a freaking moron. I can explain something to her 10 times and in 10 different ways, and that little lightbulb-over-your-head never lights up. I don't know if she's not listening, or preoccupied, or just so stubborn that she holds the belief that if-it-hasn't-happened-to-her-it-must-not-be-true. On the flipside, she has 2 kids aged 14 and 18 who are a hundred times smarter than the parents. These kids are so intuitive that many times they have practically finished my sentences and thoughts. When I speak to these kids, they respond in a way that tells me they got the exact meaning of my comment and that they're totally in the same mindframe. I don't know how these smart kids came from such retarded parents. I dunno, maybe the idiodicy skips a generation.


It is not that young people are cleverer but recently schools have focused more on teaching people to learn, rather that just teaching, it allows them to understand people more easily and makes them more open to new ideas.

jman
02-26-2007, 06:32 PM
Here is a picture (http://www.tropicalfish4u.co.uk/acatalog/copy_of_Harlequin_Rasbora.html) for anyone who is interested.

You would find them irresistible if you saw them in real life.

that's the one i love