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NoelFae
07-06-2017, 11:25 PM
Are there any kind of algae eaters I can put into a 10 gallon with my betta?

PH sits around 8-8.4

Rocksor
07-06-2017, 11:39 PM
nerite snail

Slaphppy7
07-06-2017, 11:43 PM
A mystery snail or two would work, as well

BluewaterBoof
07-06-2017, 11:56 PM
Depends entirely on the personality of each betta. Some tolerate tank mates, some don't. I've had both, and it has nothing to do with how they're raised. I've also had a betta that terrorized anything in his tank for the longest time, and then he became completely docile in his older age and lived peacefully in a 55g community tank filled with tetras, rasboras, and several different types of shrimp until the day he passed away. Strangest thing.

It's going to be a gamble with anything you put in there. Could end up giving him a very expensive snack. Ghost shrimp are dirt cheap and no tears to be shed if they're eaten, but they are poor algae eaters and difficult to breed a sustaining population. Neocaridina shrimp, such as the popular red cherry shrimp, can be somewhat cheap depending on the grade and color morph, and breed incredibly easily, but may become too irresistible for your betta.

I ended up getting a mystery snail to keep my homicidal betta company. The betta tried picking fights with it for a while, but the snail was able to retreat to the protection of its shell. After a while, the betta finally realized that the snail could not be beaten nor was it a foe and accepted him as a tank buddy.

What seems to be the extent of your algae issue? I'm no guru by any means, but I can offer a bit of advice based on my own experiences as well as what I've seen/researched here and other places :22:

I may be able to help you pin down your culprit if you provide the following info:
Type of substrate
How often you do water changes, and the amount you change
What light you use (brand/type) and how long you leave it on each day
Any supplementation you put in the tank, such as fertilizer for plants

7 times out of 10, algae can be reduced/eliminated by:
Increasing your water change frequency and amount to at least 50% every week
Reducing your lighting period to 7hrs or less (a cheap wall timer is a simple fix for this)
Raising your light source by a couple of inches
Cutting back on fertilizing, if you are growing live plants

BluewaterBoof
07-06-2017, 11:57 PM
nerite snail

Nerites are potential nightmares. If you end up with a female, she'll cover your tank/decor with unsightly eggs.

mac
07-07-2017, 12:50 AM
Blue water is correct.
Water changes and a few simple changes make for easy control on algae.

Fixing the course and source of the issue vs just a temp fix with something to eat it is way better in the long and short term.

Circulation and water changed along with clean filters have helped completly remove the dreaded black bears algae with utter ease.

NoelFae
07-07-2017, 06:30 AM
I may be able to help you pin down your culprit if you provide the following info:
Type of substrate
How often you do water changes, and the amount you change
What light you use (brand/type) and how long you leave it on each day
Any supplementation you put in the tank, such as fertilizer for plants

Ik Bettas can be iffy about tank mates. From what I know Ares is okay? I've only seen him flare once in 6 months and he won't even flare up at his reflection. The algae is just brown algae that's growing at the top of my decos and I think it's ugly and it grows pretty quick so it's a big clean every time I'm tired of it and I'm scared of stressing him out.

My substrate is rocks from petsmart I'm pretty sure they're topfin brand
I do water changes once a week and about 10%? A little more maybe?
I don't know what kind of light it is - the guy at bigals sold me a lid with a light in it and said it was good for plants and it's on from 9am to 11pm
And I don't put any stuff for my plants in

mac
07-07-2017, 08:50 AM
Hmmm thats a fair amount of lighting time. Be interested in knowing the light out puts.

The longest mine are on is 9hrs.

BluewaterBoof
07-07-2017, 02:32 PM
Agreed, that's a pretty long photoperiod. Try swinging by someplace like Walmart and pick up a cheap wall timer. Doesn't have to be a fancy model. I think they have basic ones for like $5-$8.

Cut the lighting down to 7hrs, for starters. If you like having the light on when you're home at night, set the timer to kick the light on at 1pm so that it is still lighting up the tank when you're home from work/school. If you get a timer that allows multiple on/offs per day, you could even set it up to where its on for several hours in the morning before you leave, and then comes on again when you get home.

I would also highly suggest increasing the amount of your water changes. One thing a lot of people don't realize is that there is more to water chemistry than ammonia/nitrites/nitrates. Even if your nitrates are super low/nonexistent, you are still adding lots of stuff to the tank every time you feed the fish or top it off with some extra water if it evaporates throughout the week. If you're changing less than 50%, you are gradually adding more stuff to the tank over very long periods of time. This results in a couple of different consequences, one of them being a buildup of excess nutrients for the algae to thrive off of. Doing weekly changes of 50% or more will drastically reduce all that buildup, as long as your new water is fairly clean. If you don't have one of these (https://www.amazon.com/25-Foot-Python-Aquarium-Maintenance/dp/B000255NXC), I highly recommend the investment as they will last you years and take all of the effort out of water changes.

So try those two things, for now, and see if the tank clears up on its own. Cut the light down to 7hrs and increase the amount of your water changes.

Please note that a large water change after many months/years of insufficient water changes can lead to osmotic shock in the fish of the TDS levels of the tank drop very quickly after being super high for a long period of time. For the first week, do smaller changes, like 10-20%, every two days or so throughout the week. This will gradually lower your TDS levels to a point where single large water changes wont shock your little fella.

A neat little thing to have is a TDS meter. You can get them for about $10 from Amazon for little handheld "pen" types. You just stick them into your water for five seconds and it will tell you how much stuff is building up in your tank over time. You can use it to determine how much water needs to be changed.

NoelFae
07-07-2017, 03:22 PM
I don't think a 50% change will bug him so much - I had a buildup of cynobacteria a month ago and we were doing 50%-100% a week because I just wanted to get rid of it (100% was only when I would pull everything out of the tank and scrub it all down)

I'll lower how long my lights are on for then and see if that helps