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sauerkraut
05-26-2017, 02:23 AM
hello! i have a 24 gal. aqarium with a pagoda snail, a mexican dwarf crayfish and a twin tail halfmoon betta male (i think thats his breed) he is a pretty docile betta i have never seen him flare and he has been around male guppys before. i have been thinking about doing a betta Community tank with him and i have been looking at indian dwarf puffers for him and ive heard people say that you absolutely canot keep them together and some people say its a great idea. i love puffers but i definitely dont want him to get hurt. i have also been looking at delta guppys, german blue rams, and a khuli loach. thank you for all the help!

sauerkraut
05-26-2017, 02:34 AM
hello! i have a 24 gal. aqarium with a pagoda snail, a mexican dwarf crayfish, and one twin tail half moon betta (i think thats his breed) and as far as bettas go he is very docile. i have never seen him flare and he has been around male guppys before with no aggression that i saw. so i have been thinking of doing a betta community with him. and i have been looking at indian dwarf puffers. i have heard people say you can absolutely never ever keep them together and some of them say its fine and a great idea. i love puffers but i dont want him hurt. thank you for all the help! also do you think it would be okay to put a blue german ram in there too? thank you!

Platylover
05-26-2017, 02:42 AM
Dwarf puffers really need a species only aquarium and are extremely aggressive. They've been known to kill fish much larger than themselves, would not reccomend it. I wouldn't put a betta with a cichlid either, to many things can go wrong. I'd be careful of your crayfish and make sure he doesn't start to go after your betta.:)

sauerkraut
05-26-2017, 03:06 AM
thank you so much for all the great info!

sauerkraut
05-26-2017, 03:10 AM
do you know if there are any types of puffers i can keep with my betta?

Platylover
05-26-2017, 04:03 AM
No, I believe all puffers need a species only tank. No problem, glad I could help!

Slaphppy7
05-26-2017, 02:48 PM
Sometimes other fish work with bettas, MANY times they don't...I definitely would not try the puffers

I'm more concerned about the cray getting ahold of the betta....

I have combined your two threads, since they are basically duplicates

sauerkraut
05-27-2017, 02:51 PM
the dwarf crayfish is not even a inch the betta has slept on the floor plenty times and never had any nipped fins but as soon as i see any signs i will take the betta out.

Slaphppy7
05-27-2017, 02:58 PM
He may be small now, but he will grow, and will be faster than the betta...like you say, keep an eye on it, but generally speaking, crays and fish aren't a good mix

aquariumfilter
05-30-2017, 01:15 PM
Really great and I am so grateful to get the info! Thank you so much for sharing this.

Boundava
05-30-2017, 02:45 PM
Dwarf puffers really need a species only aquarium and are extremely aggressive. They've been known to kill fish much larger than themselves, would not recommend it. I wouldn't put a betta with a cichlid either, to many things can go wrong. I'd be careful of your crayfish and make sure he doesn't start to go after your betta.:)

I agree with the above 100%

Finding tank mates for your betta can be hard and depends on your betta. If the tank has been his for a while-he may not appreciate new tank mates. There are no puffers you can keep with your betta. Puffers are generally territorial even males and females will fight each other


do you know if there are any types of puffers i can keep with my betta?

Puffers are generally territorial even males and females will fight each other if you don't have them in a heavily planted tank where they can hide from each other. Even then the puffers are like bettas-some are more tolerant than others, and others are just killers. There are quite large puffers that are community puffers, but would not work in your tank. Also all puffers are bigger wast producers not only from the the way they eat, but from their waste...they are big poopers.


Sometimes other fish work with bettas, MANY times they don't...I definitely would not try the puffers

I'm more concerned about the cray getting ahold of the betta....

Fish are what crayfish eat, its only a matter of time that something happens.
https://www.reference.com/pets-animals/crayfish-eat-6f4e1100f1284627#

Q:What do crayfish eat?
A: QUICK ANSWER
As omnivore's, Crayfish like to eat shell fish, worms, plants, insects, plankton, insects and snails. Crayfish are not picky and will even eat dead fish, decaying plants and dead animals. They will eat anything within their reach, whether it be in the wild or in the bottom of their tank.

http://aquariumtidings.com/freshwater-crayfish-care/


Housing

A single crayfish can be kept in a relatively small aquarium. A 5 to 10 gallon aquarium is usually more than adequate, especially if regular water changes are provided. Crayfish are notorious for hiding their food, and will often have a stash hidden away in a cave or flower-pot. On top of that, they are also messy eaters, and when coupled with hidden food , water quality can quickly decline. When doing water changes, you should always check for a stash of food in any of the crayfish hiding spots.

If more than one crayfish is going to be housed in a tank, then a minimum of 20 gallons need to be provided. Crayfish are cannibalistic by nature, and when a crayfish moults it is nearly defenseless until its shell hardens again. During this time, it will hide for a few days, so don’t be too alarmed if a crayfish disappears for a up to a week at a time. Because of this, it is very important to provide numerous hiding places and enough space for each crayfish in the aquarium – unless someone wants their crayfish to become an expensive meal for the other tank inhabitants.

It becomes much trickier when it comes to housing crayfish with fish. There are many accounts of people successfully keeping crayfish and fish together, but given enough time, either the fish or the crayfish is going to be eaten. There is nothing worse than losing a large, expensive fish to a crayfish over the course of a night. Or alternatively, finding crayfish parts scattered across an aquarium, with a very full looking fish. While a person can certainly try to keep fish and crayfish together, it ends badly more often than not.

If you have a fish tank with crayfish in it, you may want be cautious about adding other small fish to the tank. Drowsy fish or fish that swim on the bottom of the tank make easy meals for crayfish. Crayfish love to eat decaying plants such as spinach and lettuce, and will eat it immediately if available. Gold fish food, Algae wafers and shrimp pellets are all nutritious foods that you can buy in a pet store for your crayfish.



You also said you were considering
i have also been looking at delta guppys, german blue rams, and a khuli loach.

Since the guppies will have flowing tails the betta may nip at them or vice versa-depends on who is more aggressive and faster.

German Blue Rams tend to be touchy fish and are very sensitive to water conditions, you can try Bolivians-but I would not house them with a crayfish since they will all be on the bottom level of the tank.

Same for the kuhli loach...it lives mostly on the substrate-and likes to dig itself into the substrate. Also Kuhli loaches are very social and you really should get a nice group of 6-8 to actually be able to see them out and about. They are more comfortable in larger numbers. Not sure if your tank would be able to house that many-though of all your choices I think they would work the best with the betta, they would confuse him more than anything as they are very unfish-like.

The black kuhli is slightly smaller than the banded-so may be a better choice for your tank.

Here's a neat guide on Kuhlis

http://www.fishforums.net/threads/different-species-of-kuhli-loach.386784/

mermaidwannabe
06-10-2017, 04:54 PM
You're probably better off leaving your Siamese Fighting Fish by himself in his tank. If you wish to go community, get another tank and set it up that way from the outset. Be sure to cycle it, first.

I would also recommend keeping the crayfish in a separate tank by himself. You may end up needing three tanks in all -- one for the Betta, one community, and one for the crayfish.

That's just how nature works, and it's really the only way you can make this work. If this is practical for you, it could be a lot more successful.