Fish news
Fish news
 
Archives for: February 2010
Whales weren’t the first giant filter-feeders in the sea

Newly investigated fossils show that a type of filter-feeding fishes that aren’t closely related to today’s whales (who, of course, are mammals and not fishes) roamed the oceans during the Mesozoic Era some 170 million years ago. Previously the whales were believed to have been the first large filter feeders, but these new fossils tell a different story.

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Python-hunting season coming up

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) has declared March 8 through April 17 hunting season for Burmese pythons living on state lands in South Florida.

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Rarely seen deep-dweller caught on tape by remotely operated vehicle

The huge oarfish has been filmed by scientists operating a tiny submarine by remote. This may be the first time this fish is filmed, or even seen, in its natural environment. The species might have been caught on camera at a depth of 765 meters during a research mission off the coast of western African in 2007, but marine experts haven’t been able to positively identify the creature in that video.

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Spitting fish learn to catch artificial flies

In south-east Asia and northern Australia, Archer fish can be seen spitting jets of water up to three meters to knock out insects and spiders and make them fall into the water. Archer fish does for instnace help control the populations of mosquitoes and flies.

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Funny looking fish found in Chinese mountain cave

Residents of the Daluo village in China’s Guangxi province have caught several weird looking yellow fishes in a cave lake located 1,000 meters (3,280 feet) below ground.

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King demoiselle turns out to be three species, not one

A recent study has unveiled that the King demoiselle (Chrysiptera rex) is actually three different species that recently diverged from each other.

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Swedish vacationer killed by jellyfish in Malaysia

A Swedish woman vacationing with her family in Langkawi, Malaysia was killed by a jellyfish while bathing off the coast of Pantai Cenang.

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AquaSketcher

If you’re into interior design, you have probably encountered the online tools that allow you to try different types of interior designs online without breaking a sweat. With a simple drag and click you can move around heavy sofas, rearrange book shelves and try out 54 different types of rug.

But did you know that there is a very similar tool has been created for all the aquarium aficionados out there: the AquaSketcher.

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Hemorrhagic fish virus identified in Lake Superior

For the first time, a viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV or VHSv) has been identified in fish from Lake Superior, the largest of the five Great Lakes of North America.

The virus was identified by researchers at the Cornell University’s College of Veterinary Medicine and the finding has also been confirmed by the United States Geological Survey’s (USGS) Western Fisheries Research Center in Seattle.

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What is VHS? (viral hemorrhagic septicemia)

Viral hemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS) is a disease caused by a negative-sense single-stranded RNA virus of the genus Novirhabdovirus. Infected fish suffer from haemorrhaging of their internal organs, skin and muscles. Symptoms that can be observed from the outside includes reddened eyes, gills, skins and fin, opens sores, a bloated abdomen, and bulging eyes, but some fish show no outward signs at all.

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