Fish news
Fish news
 
Archives for: January 2010
Cold winter causes problems for tropical fish breeders in Florida

The low temperatures that’s been holding the state of Florida in a firm grip this winter is causing troubles for tropical fish raised in outdoor ponds. Aquarium fish farmers report losing up to 50% of popular tropical species to the cold, and a severe guppy shortage has already emerged – boosted by the fact that Americans are more inclined to purchase guppies and other aquarium inhabitants during the winter season.

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Medieval shipwrecks threatened by the spread of shipworm into the Baltic Sea

The shipworm Teredo navalis is spreading to the Baltic Sea, threatening to destroy archaeological artefacts. Researchers* at Gothenburg University suspect that climate change is what’s making it possible for this species to spread and are now joining the EU project WreckProtect, a cooperative effort to assess which archaeological treasures are at risk.

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First ever U.S. marine debris action plan implemented in Hawaii

Yesterday, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and its Hawaiian partners announced the first marine debris action plan to be implemented in the United States. The goal of the plan is to actively assess and remove man-made debris such as plastics and lost fishing gear from Hawaii’s coastal waters. Each year, thousands of pounds of marine debris wash ashore on this delicate island chain.

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“Perhaps part of the reason the males are so likely to cheat is that females never punish males”,

Male Labroides dimidiatus cleaner fish punish females that bite instead of clean (thus driving off the bigger fish) but females never punish males for doing exactly the same thing.

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Starfish and sea urchins counteract our carbon emissions

Out of the estimated 5.5 gigatonnes of carbon emitted each year by human activities, about 1.8 percent are removed from the air and stored by echinoderms such as starfish, sea urchins, brittle stars and sea lilies. This makes them less important “carbon sinkers” than plankton, but the finding is still significant since no one expected them to catch such a large chunk of our wayward carbon.

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Bioorb 60 Classic Collection review

Below you will find my review of the Reef One (reef-one.com) 60L/16 gallon BiOrb. The orb was provided to me by the company, but this is not paid advertising space. If I’ll end up hating the orb, you’ll know about it

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Don’t feed the Trash Vortex!

If you’re an environmentally conscious golf enthusiast you probably cringe at the shear notion of playing golf near the shoreline or practise your swing onboard a yacht or cruise ship where the risk of your balls ending up in the ocean is high.

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Sea lions left San Francisco bay to enjoy the Oregon caves

Throughout December, hundreds of sea lions vanished from the San Francisco bay area only to show up later in the Oregon Sea Lion Caves. The Oregon Sea Lion Caves are a connected system of sea caves and caverns located along the Pacific coast of Oregon and a popular hangout for sea birds such as the tufted puffin, pigeon guillemot, Brandt’s […]

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If you’re in Portugal, don’t eat the dead octopuses washed up on the beach

Thousands of dead octopuses have washed up on a beach in northern Portugal. So far, no one has been able to explain what’s happened to them.

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Good news from the Gulf of Mexico – the red snapper is recovering!

The red snapper population living in the Gulf of Mexico is showing signs of recovery, according to new information obtained by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration of the United States (NOAA).

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The mystery of why Amazonian manatees migrate

A few years back scientists became aware that Amazonian manatees (Trichechus inunguis) migrate from shallow to deep water each year, starting in October or November when the dry season makes the water level decrease in their favoured habitat. A team of Brazilian and British researchers now claim have found out why these mesmerizing creatures undertake a perilous journey to get to a habitat that doesn’t have much to offer food wise.

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