Fish news
Fish news
 
Archives for: October 2009
Caribbean fish travelling in style

The National Marine Aquarium in Plymouth, UK has received some attention in the press after chartering a Boeing 767 to fly in a 42-tonne cargo of Caribbean fish for a new exhibition.

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The evolutionary benefits of being a stepdaddy

In most species, a male specimen will usually don’t invest a lot of time or energy in caring for young when there is a good chance that he is not their father. There are how ever exceptions to this rule, such as the Ocellated wrasse.

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Jordan plans to refill Dead Sea using water from Red Sea

The Jordanian government has announced its plans to extract over 10 billion cubic feet of water per year from the Red Sea and send most of it to a desalination plant to produce drinking water.

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How do superswarms of krill form?

In the ocean, krill live together in swarms, some of them stretching for tens of kilometres. Krill swarms are some of the largest gatherings of life on the planet and this naturally poses some puzzling questions to science: Why are krill living together? How do they find each other? Why are some swarms enormous when others are more moderately sized?

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Capture of Mako shark off Florida sharply criticized online

Florida anglers are being sharply criticized after a video of them free-gaffing a Mako shark off South Florida this week was made public on the Internet.

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Dolphin hunting banned in Bihar

The rare Gangetic dolphin (Platanista gangetica) has been declared National Aquatic Animal of India. A few days after the formal declaration, which took place at a National Ganga River Basic Authority meeting in New Delhi earlier this week, Bihar chief minister Nitish Kumar announced that he has directed state authorities to put a halt to dolphin hunting in the Ganga.

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Man made pollution a source of bio-available iron for oceanic organisms

Lack of iron is a limiting factor for plankton growth in many parts of the ocean, especially in the southern oceans and parts of the eastern Pacific. Scientists at the University of Leeds, UK, have now showed that acid in the atmosphere breaks down large particles of iron found in dust into small and highly soluble iron naonparticles; particles which can be easily absorbed and utilized by oceanic plankton.

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Maldives bans reef shark fishing by March 2010

The Maldives is planning to ban shark fishing in its waters, a move which would make the Maldives the first nation in the region to enact such a protective law.

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Arctic Sea ice recovered slightly this year

Compared to the record-setting low years of 2007 and 2008, the Arctic Sea ice has made a slight recovery in 2009, according to the University of Colorado at Boulder’s National Snow and Ice Data Center. Despite this positive change, the minimum sea ice extent in 2009 was the third lowest since satellite record-keeping started in 1979.

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Mexico creates world’s largest underwater museum

A gigantic underwater museum filled with 400 sculptures will be created in Mexico’s West Coast National Park in on the Yucatán Peninsula. The artistic director is Jason de Caires Taylor, famous for his underwater sculptures, but other artists will also be involved in the project.

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Australia forms marine park to protect humpback calving zone

A marine park will be formed at Camden Sound, Australia, in an effort to protect the Humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae). Once hunted to the brink of extinction, the humpbacks have already bounced back considerably thanks to conservation efforts and they are now much sought after by whale-watchers, particularly off parts of Australia, Canada, and the United States.

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When opposites won’t attract; same-colour medakas preferentially selective for each other

An international team of researchers have shown how one single gene mutation is capable of making the medaka, a Japanese killifish, loose its attractive colours and display a drab grey colour which renders them significantly less attractive to medakas of the opposite sex – unless that potential mate is grey too.

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How to tell if a salmon is wild or farmed?

Telling a wild salmon from a farmed one can be tricky, especially if you don’t want to kill or injure the fish in question. To solve this problem, Dr Elizabeth Adey of the Scottish Association for Marine Science (SAMS) have developed a way of using fish scale analysis to determine the origin of a salmon.

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Chihuahua survives 24 hours inside sunken riverboat

Fancy, a four-year-old Chihuahua, survived for more than 24 hours under water after being left inside a capsized riverboat. She was onboard a houseboat that sunk in the river near Toledo, USA after hitting a stump.

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Surprising coral discovery may increase federal habitat protection near Palm Beach, Florida

A previously unknown field of endangered Staghorn coral has been found in Florida waters by scuba divers belonging to the non-profit group Palm Beach County Reef Rescue.

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