Fish news
Fish news
 
Archives for: October 2009
Will genetic gene sequencing help save the tuna?

A new method for distinguishing between tuna species has been presented in a paper co-authored by Dr Jordi Viñas, a fish genetics specialist at Girona University in Spain and Dr Sergi Tudela, Head of Fisheries of WWF Mediterranean.

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Monterey Bay Aquarium asks top chefs to help restore marine life

The Monterey Bay Aquarium has launched a national campaign asking top U.S. chefs and culinary decision makers to take a “Save Our Seafood” pledge not to serve items listed in the “avoid” section of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch List.

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Mantis shrimps may help us develop better DVD players

The amazing eyes found on the mantis shrimp may inspire a new generation of CD:s and DVD:s, according to a new study from the University of Bristol.

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Giant prehistoric predator found in UK waters

The fossilised skull of a gigantic predator has been found off the English Channel coast of southern England.

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Zoological Society of London creates world’s first coral cryobank

The Zoological Society of London (ZSL) has announced their plans to create a cryobank for corals. Corals will be collected from tropical areas and placed in liquid nitrogen at the Whipsnade zoo in Bedfordshire.

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Thousands of seabirds killed by algae on the U.S. west coast

An algae bloom stretching from the Olympic Peninsula in Washington state to the northern parts of Oregon has killed thousands of seabirds by stripping them of the natural oils that keep them waterproof. Without these oils, seabirds quickly get wet and succumb to hypothermia.

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Indonesian Navy sends warships to protect fish

The Indonesian Navy (TNI AL) has officially announced that they are deploying five warships and one reconnaissance plane to protect the Natuna waters from illegal fishing and poaching.

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Clemson researchers claim algae killed the dinosaurs

According to geologist James W. Castle and ecotoxicologist John H. Rodgers, both of the Clemson University in South Carolina, toxin-producing algae caused or contributed to the mass extinction of dinosaurs.

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Shark pups feed off their own livers

In order to survive until it becomes a skilled hunter, a shark pups is born with an enlarged “super liver” that functions as a food source for several months.

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Japan kills 59 whales for feeding study

The annual whale expedition off the Japanese port city of Kushiro ended this weekend after having caught 59 minke whales, the Japanese Fisheries Agency said in a statement.

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Deletion of single molecule makes fish switch to violet vision

Researchers from Emory University have identified the first fish to have switched from ultraviolet vision to violet vision, i.e. the ability to see blue light. This fish in question – a type of scabbardfish – is also the first example of an animal where a deleted molecule has resulted in a change in visual spectrum.

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World’s first semi-cloned fish created in Singapore

A research team from the National University of Singapore announced this week that they have created the world’s first semi-cloned fish – a female medaka fish named Holly.

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Barnacle glue works like human blood

Barnacles are capable of attaching themselves to virtually any underwater surface; from whale skin and turtle shells to ship hulls and pier structures. Just how they manage to keep themselves anchored has remained a mystery; a multimillion mystery since barnacles increase fuel consumption by adding additional drag to the submerged parts of marine vessels. Scientists knew that the barnacles used a type of glue, but they didn’t understand how it worked and why it was so strong.

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Louisiana gators surprise scientists with their fidelity

A 10-year study of Rockefeller Wildlife Refuge alligators has yielded some surprising results. Despite having plenty of suitable males to choose among, up to 70 percent of the female gators in this Louisiana refuge preferred to mate with the same male year after another.

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Mangrove forests, salt marshes and seagrass beds important carbon sinks

According to a new UN report, marine plants take 2 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide away from the atmosphere each year as they use the carbon dioxide for photosynthesis. Most of these plants are plankton, but planktons rarely form a permanent carbon store on the seabed. Instead, mangrove forests, salt marshes and seagrass beds are responsible for locking away well over 50 percent of all carbon that is buried in the sea – an amazing feat when you consider that these types of habitat only comprise 1 percent of the world’s seabed.

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