Fish news
Fish news
 
Archives for: September 2009
American researchers get to the bottom of marine molecule mystery

Researchers at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and the University of South Carolina has managed to solve a conundrum that’s been puzzling marine scientists for roughly a decade – where does all the oceanic phosphonate come from?

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Mexican researchers breed gar in captivity using new sexing technique

The gar family, famous for containing the largest fresh water fishes in Mexico, is currently at risk of becoming extinct – something which Mexican researchers are working hard to prevent.

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Tiny island nation creates world’s first shark sanctuary

The world’s first shark sanctuary will be created by Palau, a small island nation in the Pacific Ocean.

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Site Update

We have updated the crocodillian section of the site and it is now possible to find info about most crocodillians in it.

American Alligator
American Crocodile
Black Caiman
Broad Snouted Caiman

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Flatfish – how did its eyes get to the same side of the head?

If you’ve ever wondered how the eyes of flatfish like flounder and sole ended up on one side of the head, you should take a closer look at a newly published article by Dr Matt Friedman.

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Tuna stocks expected to recover by 2013

According to Australian Southern Bluefin Tuna Association chief executive Brian Jeffriess, industry experts expect the tuna stocks to have recovered by 2013.

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New species of shark found in Californian waters; male has retractable sexual appendages on the forehead

For the first time since 1947, a new species of cartilaginous fish has been described from Californian waters. The new species – Hydrolagus melanophasma – belongs to a group of sharks known as Chimaeras or ghostsharks.

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Six-foot long gelatinous animal found in Brazilian waters turns out to be an Ateleopodidae

When a six-foot-long gelatinous animal turned up off Brazil’s Bahia cost, initial accounts quoted scientists calling the creature “completely new, scientifically speaking.” However, fish experts taking a closer look at the video footage have now managed to identify it as being a member of Ateleopodidae, an elusive family of deep-sea fish known as jellynoses or tadpole fish.

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19½ feet long squid caught in the Gulf of Mexico

A 19.5 feet long squid – that’s almost 6 meter – has been caught in the Gulf of Mexico by a group of scientists from the NOAA’s* Southeast Fisheries Science Center and the Department of the Interior’s Minerals Management Service. This is only the second known giant squid caught in the Gulf of Mexico and the last one was collected 55 years ago.

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We are back

After a long period of internet problems we are finally back online and news posting should return to normal from now on. Thanks for being patient during the last two months.

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Researchers improve zebra fish cloning – “We used the same entrance that sperm uses”

A team of scientists at the Michigan State University has found a new, more efficient method for cloning zebra fish.

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Reef And Beef – Can cows save our reefs?

Dr Parker, from James Cook University’s School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, and collaborator Professor Rocky de Nys, from JCU’s School of Marine and Tropical Biology, have just received a $7,000 Collaboration Across Boundaries grant to prove their theory that feeding seaweed to cow will improve their digestion and make them produce less methane.

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‘Eat ‘um to beat ‘um – Lion hunt in the Bermudas

Bermuda’s first Lionfish Tournament resulted in just four participants returning with lionfish for the weigh-in. Although this might sound disheartening, it is actually happy news for Lionfish project leader Chris Flook of the Bermuda Aquarium, Museum and Zoo since it indicates a relative scarcity of lionfish in Bermuda waters.

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Bottom-feeders let loose in foreclosed Floridian homes

The Floridian town of Wellington used to spend nearly 7,000 USD a month of taxpayer funds to keep the stagnant pools of foreclosed homes sanitary.

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Cool new jelly discovered by ROV

For anyone interested in learning more about the fascinating creatures inhabiting the deep and chilly waters of the Canadian Basin, details of a 2005 research mission has now been published in the journal Deep Sea Research Part II.

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