Fish news
Fish news
 
Archives for: April 2009
Squeaker catfish evolved from single ancestor

The members of the genus Synodontis, commonly known as the squeaker catfishes of Lake Tanganyika, evolved from a single common ancestor according to a paper* published in a recent issue of the Journal of Evolutionary Biology.

By with 0 comments
Two new species of Leporinus described from the Araguaia-Tocantins River system

Two new species of the genus Leporinus has been described from the Araguaia-Tocantins River system in the Amazon basin: Leporinus unitaeniatus and Leporinus geminis. Brazilian ichthyologists Julio Garavello and Geraldo Santos describe them both in a paper* published in the most recent issue of Brazilian Journal of Biology. Leporinus unitaeniatus Leporinus unitaeniatus derives its name from its distinguishing colour pattern; […]

By with 0 comments
New fish described from the Ntem River drainage in Cameroon, Africa

A new species of the genus Chromaphyosemion has been described by Jean-Françcois Agnèse and his co-authors in a paper* published in a recent issue of the journal Zootaxa.

The new species, who has been given the name Chromaphyosemion campomaanense, belongs to the A. calliurum species group and was collected from the the Ntem River drainage in southern Cameroon.

By with 0 comments
Dislodged sponges can be successfully reattached to coral reefs

As part of a reef restoration study, researchers removed 20 specimens of the Caribbean giant barrel sponge from the Conch Reef off of Key Largo, Florida and then re-attached them using sponge holders consisting of polyvinyl chloride piping. The sponge holders were anchored in concrete blocks set on a plastic mesh base. Some sponges were reattached at a depth of 15 meters and some further down at 30 metres.

By with 0 comments
Seven new bamboo corals discovered in Hawaii

A NOAA* expedition by has discovered seven new species of Bamboo corals (family Isididae) in the deep waters off Hawaii Six of them may belong to en entirely new genus.

The findings were made within the Papah Naumoku Kea Marine National Monument, one of the biggest marine conservation areas in the world.

By with 0 comments
Eel larvae use ‘gelatinous goo’ to maintain buoyancy

Japanese eel (Anguilla japonica) larvae have amazing buoyancy compared to other oceanic plankton, and the reason may be a type of gelatinous goo contained within the body.

When researchers from the University of Tokyo measured the specific gravity of Japanese eel larvae, they found it to be as low as 1.019, rising to 1.043 – showing the larvae to be potentially lighter than seawater itself. (Sea water has an average specific gravity of 1.024.)

By with 0 comments
Are octopuses older than we think?

The discovery of three new species of fossilized octopi in Lebanon has caused scientists to suspect that the first octopus appeared tens of millions of years earlier than previously thought.

By with 0 comments
Remedy against Alzheimer’s found in squid?

A Taiwan research team has successfully extracted a brain-boosting nutrient from squid skin, according to an announcement made by the Council of Agriculture’s Fisheries Research Institute.

The nutrient in question is phospholipid docosahexaenoic acid, commonly known as PL-DHA, a substance known to improve a persons memory and enhance learning ability.

By with 0 comments
East African reefs “unusually resilient” against climate change, study says

In a study announced today by the Wildlife Conservation Society* (WCS) at the International Coral Reef Initiative** (ICRI) meeting in Thailand, researchers show that some coral reefs located off East Africa are unusually resilient to climate change. The high resilience is believed to be caused by geophysical factors in combination with improved fisheries management in these waters.

By with 0 comments
Reef damage from snorkelers and scuba divers not widespread in Hawaii

A new study from Carl Meyer and Kim Holland of the Hawai’i Institute for Marine Biology encompassing four protected marine sites in Hawai’i reveals that snorkelers and scuba divers only have a low impact on coral reef habitants at these sites and that the impact is limited to comparatively small areas.

By with 0 comments
Gen. Hoyt S. Vandenberg arrived to Key West on Wednesday to become artificial reef

After a 1,100-mile voyage and more than ten years of planning and acquiring funding resources, the ex-military ship Gen. Hoyt S. Vandenberg finally arrived in Key West this Wednesday.

The ship is scheduled to be sunk sometime between May 20 and June 1 and will eventually form the second largest artificial reef in the world. The ship will rest some six miles south of Key West in 140 feet of water in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary.

By with 0 comments
Intersex fish more common than anticipated

A recent study on intersex abnormalities in fish living in the Potomac River watershed carried out by researchers from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the U.S. Geological Survey showed that at least 82 percent of male smallmouth bass and in 23 percent of the largemouth bass had immature female germ cells (oocytes) in their reproductive organs. This number is even larger than anticipated.

By with 0 comments
Madagascar!

Madagascar, a large island situated in the Indian Ocean off the south-eastern coast of the African continent, is home to an astonishing array of flora and fauna. Madagascar, then part of the supercontinent Gondwana, split from Africa about 160 million years ago and became an island through the split from the Indian subcontinent 80-100 million years ago.

Madagascar is now the 4th largest island in the world and its long isolation from neighbouring continents has resulted in an astonishingly high degree of endemic species; species that can be found nowhere else on the planet. Madagascar is home to about 5% of the world’s plant and animal species, of which more than 80% are endemic to island.

By with 0 comments
Eat a lion, save a snapper

Since the first specimens were spotted in the year 2000, the number of lionfish living off the coast of North Carolina is now so high that scientists fear it is too late to eliminate them. Instead, marine researchers are joining forces with sport divers and cooks to keep the fish population in check the old fashion way – with rice, spicy sauce and a slice of lemon.

By with 0 comments
Stressed female fish produces active but abnormal offspring

Fish females subjected to stress produce highly active offspring but the risk of abnormalities also increases, according to new research carried out by Dr Monica Gagliano, a research fellow with the AIMS@JCU joint venture, and Dr Mark McCormick from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at the James Cook University.

By with 0 comments