Fish news
Fish news
 
Archives for: September 2008
Traditional Korean kitchenware turns out to ward off food poisoning

According to Korean scientists, brass can be used to make shellfish a safer choice at the dinner table. “We showed that copper ions diffuse out from a brass plate into a fish tank filled with seawater, and within 40 hours the copper killed 99.99% of the Vibrio food poisoning bacteria contaminating the living fish and shellfish,” says Dr Jeong-Weon Huh from the Department of Health Research at the Gyeonggi-do Institute of Health and Environment.

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Australian fishermen willing to let the Commonwealth buy back their permits

The proposed Coral Sea marine park is now one step closer to becoming a reality – it has gained support from Coral Sea fishermen.

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Lake Monster sighted in Connecticut

Another lake monster sighting. This time in West Hartford, Connecticut. The pictures that are supposedly depicting a lake monster were taken in a water reservoir last Friday. The photos were taken by Barbara Blanchfield who claims that she witnessed the sea monster in her pictures surface and then submerge again while out photographing. The Metropolitan District Commission was shown the pictures and it is now working with their wildlife and patrol department to determine what (if any) is in the water.

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Jumping sturgeon injures two in Suwannee, Florida

A four year old boy got his arm broken by a jumping sturgeon on the Suwannee River on September 7. At the same time, the boy’s father was cut by the fish. According to the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, witnesses observed the family’s boat moving through the water at about 30 miles per hour when a three to four foot long sturgeon jumped up from the water in front of the craft.

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Blue-eye habitat now protected

A conservation group named Bush Heritage Australia will spend $3.5 millions on the purchase and ongoing management of 8100 hectares in Central Queensland. The main reason for the purchase is to safeguard the rare Redfin blue-eye fish.

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Black widows established in Sweden

Unlike many other countries, Sweden has traditionally been blessed with the absence of dangerously venomous spiders, snakes and similar critters, but this might be about to change as more and more new species establish themselves in Scandinavia. One of the latest additions to the Swedish fauna is the Black widow spider, according to Naturhistoriska riksmuseet (Swedish Museum of Natural History) in Stockholm.

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Teenager’s jaw guts invasive fish

Fifteen-year old Seth Russell was floating down Lake Chicot in Arkansas on an inner tube being towed by a boat when a carp suddenly leaped out of the water and crashed into his face. The impact was severe enough to render the boy unconscious and break his jaw, but the experience must have even worse for the fish because Russell was covered in fish blood and guts after the accident.

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Another gargantuan protected area proposed for the Pacific Ocean

A group of scientists, environmental groups, and former members of Australia’s navy are now calling for the creation of another reserve that would ban fishing in a whopping 400,000 square mile area off Australia’s northeast coast.

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Two new species of fish!

Two new species of fish has been scientifically described and named: Glyptothorax filicatus and Glyptothorax strabonis. The genus Glyptothorax is a part of the family Sisoridae in the catfish order Siluriformes, and the most species-rich and widely distributed genus of the entire family.

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Breeding snakeheads found in Mattawoman Creek, Maryland

During the last week of August, Gary Owen, a Charles County sheriff’s corporal, discovered 167 snakeheads swimming in two puddles off Sharpersville Road near Mattawoman Creek in Maryland. Mattawoman Creek is a tidal tributary of the Potomac River located in Prince George’s and Charles Counties. The sheriff’s corporal was not actually on the look-out for invasive species when he did his unexpected discovery; he was leading a news crew to a location where a homicide victim was found almost 30 years ago.

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Tidal movements – a reliable alternative to fossil fuels?

Tidal movements involve immense amounts of energy and are as reliable as, well, the tide. If we could find an efficient way of harnessing these mammoth forces, tidal action might become an important source of renewable energy for populations world wide. With this in mind, a team of engineers from Oxford University have worked together to develop a new and more robust turbine design that will make it both easier and more cost-effective to take advantage of this natural resource.

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Tagged White Shark Released From Monterey Bay Aquarium

The young white shark brought to the Monterey Bay Aquarium on August 27 has now been released back into the wild after 11 days on exhibit. She was captured on August 16 in Santa Monica Bay and has now been safely returned to the same waters. During her stay at the Monterey Bay Aquarium she lived in their million-gallon Outer Bay exhibit, but despite her relatively roomy accommodation she only fed once and the staff decided that she would be better of in the wild.

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Beluga whale trained to link sounds to items

A 23-year old Beluga whale at the Kamogawa Sea World aquarium in Japan has been trained to emit different noises for different items. As of now, the whale – whose name is Nack – emits a short, high-pitched sound to identify diving fins, a long and even more high-pitched sound for diving goggles, and a short, lower sound for bucket. When the sounds are recorded and played back to Nack, he is able to identify the corresponding object.

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Underwater museum to be constructed in Alexandria, Egypt

On September 4, UNESCO announced its plans to help Egypt build an underwater museum in the Bay of Alexandria. Parts of the museum will be submerged while other parts will be located above the surface. This construction will allow visitors to view not only marine life but also the myriad of archaeological artefacts that can be found on the site.

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British Columbia sockeye runs getting smaller and smaller

The Salmon runs in British Columbia are known to fluctuate, with good years being followed by poorer ones. Since the mid-1990s, most years have however been bad and many explanations for this situation have been offered, from El Nino and too warm streams, to over-fishing and habitat destruction. It is of course tempting for the fishing industry to place the blame solely on natural phenomena like El Nino, but it is hard to turn a blind eye on the immense amounts of salmon caught from the rivers of British Columbia each year.

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