Fish news
Fish news
 
Archives for: September 2008
Acidified Ocean too noisy for whales and dolphins?

As we release more and more carbon dioxide from fossil fuel into the atmosphere, the world’s oceans become more and more acidic. Exactly how this will affect marine life remains unknown, but a paper published this week by marine chemists Keith Hester and his co-authors at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute is now shedding some light on how a change in acidity affects sound waves under water.

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Keys man punches shark to save his dog!

Last Friday, 53 year old Florida Keys resident Greg LeNoir saved his dog Jake from being devoured by a shark by jumping into the water and punching the predator.

The incident happened when LeNoir and Jake visited the Worldwide Sportsman’s Bayside Marina pier in Islamorada and Jake jumped into the water for his daily swim.

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Indian fishermen threaten suicide

A group of Indian fishermen have threatened to commit suicide unless the authorities take necessary action to stop other fishermen from using prohibited purse seine and hair nets. The banned equipment can catch at least three tonnes of fish and sea food in a single trip; efficiently depriving lawful fishermen of fish.

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Asian swamp eel invades North America!

In May this year, hundreds of Asian swamp eels were discovered in and around Silver Lake in historic Gibbsboro, New Jersey. This was the first finding in New Jersey, Asian swamp eelbut not the first finding in the United States. Unlike Florida, Georgia, and Hawaii – the three other U.S. states where this species have been discovered – New Jersey is however subjected to harsh winters and a breeding population of Asian swamp eels in New Jersey confirms the suspicion that this Asian invader has no problem adjusting to the
chilly climate of northern North America.

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Bush looking to protect more areas of the Pacific Ocean

In addition to the recently proposed areas in the Pacific Ocean, (See this and this) president Bush now says he wants to find even more regions of the Pacific Ocean to protect.

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Kosher caviar?

The Caspian Sea has traditionally been the world’s main source of caviar, but pollution and overfishing has caused serious problems for the fish in this enormous lake and yields are dwindling at a worrisome pace. The Caspian crisis is now prompting an increasing number of restaurants and importers to switch to Israeli caviar instead.

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Single moms have bigger brains

In a new study on Tanganyika cichlids, three scientists[1] [2] [3] from Uppsala University in Sweden have shown that intricate rearing behaviour varies with brain size in females. The only previously published study showing similar patterns concerned predatory animals.

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Interview with Marc van Roosmalen

Today we have the pleasure of bringing you a unique interview with Marc van Roosmalen which illustrates his situation and problems as he sees them. For those of you who aren’t familiar with who Marc van Roosmalen is, what he has done, and his present situation, I recommend reading this short introduction before reading the interview.

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Marc van Roosmalen

Born in the Netherlands in 1947, Marc van Roosmalen is a Brazilian primatologist of Dutch birth living in Manaus, Brazil. After studying biology at the University of Amsterdam he did four years of doctoral fieldwork in Suriname studying the Red-faced Spider Monkey. Since then, van Roosmalen has devoted his life to the scientific exploration of the South American flora and fauna.

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Fish turns out to have rudimentary fingers

According to a new study from Uppsala University, the origin of fingers and toes can be traced back to a type of fish that inhabited the ocean 380 million years ago. This new finding has overturned the prevailing theory on how and when digits appeared, since it has long been assumed that the very first creatures to develop primitive fingers were the early tetrapods, air-breathing amphibians that evolved from lobed-finned fish during the Devonian period and crawled up onto land about 365 million years ago.

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Can Catch Shares Prevent Fisheries Collapse?

This week, Science published the study “Can Catch Shares Prevent Fisheries Collapse?” by Costello[1], Gaine[2] and Lynham[3], which may be used as a road map for federal and regional fisheries managers interested in reversing years of declining fish stocks. Read more about their findings.

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Tongue-eating isopods and hundreds of other new species found in Australian waters

Hundreds of new animal species have been discovered by marine researchers studying Australian reefs as a part of the Census of Marine Life, an international effort to catalogue all life in the oceans. The findings include such curious creatures as tongue-eating isopod parasites living on fish and several new species of tanaid crustaceans, some with claws longer than their bodies. The team also found about 150 species of soft coral thought to be new to science, scores of tiny amphipod crustaceans of which an estimated 40 to 60% will be formally described for the first time, and dozens of small crustaceans likewise believed to be unknown to the scientific community. Researchers actually suspect that one or even several new families of species are to be found among the sampled crustaceans.

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Over 100 new sharks and rays named and described!

Australian scientists have now completed an 18-month long project aimed at scientifically describing sharks and rays, using traditional techniques as well as modern DNA sequence analysis. The ambitious project has resulted in over 100 species of sharks and rays being properly classified, which is equal to about one third of Australia’s known sharks and rays.

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Fish capable of emitting their own red light

As you probably know already, many sea living creatures are capable of emitting their own fluorescent light. Turning yourself into a living light bulb comes in handy when you live at depths where no sunlight or only very little sun light is capable of reaching you, and the glow can for instance be used for communication, as camouflage, or to lure in prey.

Up until now, most fish experts have assumed that marine fish living below a depth of 10 metres (30 feet) could not be red since the type of sunlight necessary for the colour red to be visible to the eye isn’t capable of travelling so far down into the ocean, and why would an animal develop a red pigmentation that nobody could see in its natural habitat?

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GPS tagged turtle ruins criminal master plan

This August, a turtle decided to take a stroll through a cannabis garden in a secluded part of one of America’s public parklands. This wouldn’t have been a problem for the resourceful horticulturist responsible for the plantation if it hadn’t been for the fact that this particular turtle was fitted with a GPS tracking device and followed by a park ranger. When the park ranger realised that the turtle had led him to an outdoor hydroponics lab, he contacted the police who stalked out the patch and eventually arrested its illicit gardener.

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