Fish news
Fish news
 
Category: New Discoveries
Giant prehistoric predator found in UK waters

The fossilised skull of a gigantic predator has been found off the English Channel coast of southern England.

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Clemson researchers claim algae killed the dinosaurs

According to geologist James W. Castle and ecotoxicologist John H. Rodgers, both of the Clemson University in South Carolina, toxin-producing algae caused or contributed to the mass extinction of dinosaurs.

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Shark pups feed off their own livers

In order to survive until it becomes a skilled hunter, a shark pups is born with an enlarged “super liver” that functions as a food source for several months.

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Deletion of single molecule makes fish switch to violet vision

Researchers from Emory University have identified the first fish to have switched from ultraviolet vision to violet vision, i.e. the ability to see blue light. This fish in question – a type of scabbardfish – is also the first example of an animal where a deleted molecule has resulted in a change in visual spectrum.

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Barnacle glue works like human blood

Barnacles are capable of attaching themselves to virtually any underwater surface; from whale skin and turtle shells to ship hulls and pier structures. Just how they manage to keep themselves anchored has remained a mystery; a multimillion mystery since barnacles increase fuel consumption by adding additional drag to the submerged parts of marine vessels. Scientists knew that the barnacles used a type of glue, but they didn’t understand how it worked and why it was so strong.

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Louisiana gators surprise scientists with their fidelity

A 10-year study of Rockefeller Wildlife Refuge alligators has yielded some surprising results. Despite having plenty of suitable males to choose among, up to 70 percent of the female gators in this Louisiana refuge preferred to mate with the same male year after another.

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How do superswarms of krill form?

In the ocean, krill live together in swarms, some of them stretching for tens of kilometres. Krill swarms are some of the largest gatherings of life on the planet and this naturally poses some puzzling questions to science: Why are krill living together? How do they find each other? Why are some swarms enormous when others are more moderately sized?

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American researchers get to the bottom of marine molecule mystery

Researchers at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and the University of South Carolina has managed to solve a conundrum that’s been puzzling marine scientists for roughly a decade – where does all the oceanic phosphonate come from?

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American lobsters use jet-force to travel faster

According to a new research report released by Canadian scientists, American lobsters use jet propulsion to gain extra speed as the walk across the ocean floor.

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Two new worms and an ancient crustacean discovered by cave divers in submarine lava tube

A previously unknown species of crustacean and two previously unknown species of annelid worms have been discovered during a cave dive near Lanzarote in the Canary Islands off the coast of northern Africa.

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Ocean-going robot will warn us of harmful algal blooms

The Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) have developed an aquatic robot capable of collecting algal cells from the ocean and extracting the genetic information needed to identify them.

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Mouse-deer swims underwater to escape predators

Two species of Asian mouse-deer have been observed utilizing a very interesting technique to get away from predators; they jump into the water and stay there until its safe to come up. By carefully swimming up to the surface to breathe now and then they can stay submerged for long periods of time.

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Dragonfly nymphs responsible for the lack of frog legs (but frogs infested with nematodes may have a few to spare)

One of the most controversial environmental issues of the past decade now seems to have been solved thanks to the consolidated efforts of one U.S. and one U.K. researcher.

In the late 1980s and early 1990s, researchers started getting reports of numerous deformed wild frogs and toads. Many of them missed a limb partly or completely, while others – even more strikingly – had extra legs or extra arms.

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J-shape trounces C-start as Asian snake exploits the escape reflex of fish to its advantage

You have probably noticed it if you’ve ever tried to catch a fish using your bare hands or a small net: the uncanny ability of these creatures to escape, sometimes even before you make a move. Most fish species are incredibly fast and seem to be virtual mind-readers when it comes to predicting when and where you will make your next attempt.

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Learning from the best

“Small fish may have small brains but they still have some surprising cognitive abilities”, says Dr Jeremy Kendal* from Durham University’s Anthropology Department.

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