Fish and aquatic news » shalafi04 http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/news The latest news from below the surface Wed, 23 Oct 2013 11:30:17 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.6.1 Update on Cause of Cownose Stingray Deaths http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/news/lib/51 http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/news/lib/51#comments Thu, 15 May 2008 19:38:23 +0000 shalafi04 http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/news/?p=51 Another stingray has died at the Calgary Zoo, and it could take the zoo up to two months to receive the toxicology reports back from the lab to determine what the true cause was. Gill irritation and lack of eating were the first signs that the rays were in trouble. Now a total of 35 stingrays are dead. The remaining […]

The post Update on Cause of Cownose Stingray Deaths appeared first on Fish and aquatic news.

]]>
Another stingray has died at the Calgary Zoo, and it could take the zoo up to two months to receive the toxicology reports back from the lab to determine what the true cause was. Gill irritation and lack of eating were the first signs that the rays were in trouble. Now a total of 35 stingrays are dead. The remaining rays will be placed back into the main exhibit and the zoo is not commenting on weather they will be replenishing the original population of rays.

Toxins in the water may have come unintentionally by people in the petting tanks, and this is why some keepers believe this is an improper way to house these animals. Rob Laidlaw, executive director of ZooCheck Canada, was quoted by Cnews stating “”We don’t believe animals should be taken from the wild so people can play with them.” Ultimately questioning the educational value of such ray petting exhibits. As for the remaining eight. They will be released into the main exhibit for observation by zoo patrons, because it is simply the best environment for them, and they are safe from accidental contamination.

 

to read the entire article about the Calgary Zoos tradgic loss of cownosed rays visit: http://cnews.canoe.ca/CNEWS/Canada/2008/05/14/5561296-sun.html

The post Update on Cause of Cownose Stingray Deaths appeared first on Fish and aquatic news.

]]>
http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/news/lib/51/feed 0
34 cownose stingrays dead at Calgary Zoo http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/news/lib/49 http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/news/lib/49#comments Wed, 14 May 2008 20:02:21 +0000 shalafi04 http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/news/?p=49 (photo provided by: NOAA Photo Library) Thirty-four cownose stingrays died in a 24 hour period at the new $250,000 dollar exhibit in the Calgary Zoo. Veterinarians are stating that it must be a water problem for so many animals to die so quickly. The nine surviving stingrays are remaining under close observation while the cause is determined and the exhibit […]

The post 34 cownose stingrays dead at Calgary Zoo appeared first on Fish and aquatic news.

]]>
ray 34 cownose stingrays dead at Calgary Zoo

(photo provided by: NOAA Photo Library)

Thirty-four cownose stingrays died in a 24 hour period at the new $250,000 dollar exhibit in the Calgary Zoo. Veterinarians are stating that it must be a water problem for so many animals to die so quickly. The nine surviving stingrays are remaining under close observation while the cause is determined and the exhibit remains closed. In just three hours, on Sunday, 26 of the 43 stingrays had died. The following morning the other eight had passed as well.

Further information on the findings of the cause of death will be posted once provided.

 

to read the entire article visit: http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNews/story/CTVNews/20080512/stingray_deaths_080512/20080512?hub=TopStories

(photo is of a Southern Ray not a CowNose Stingray)

The post 34 cownose stingrays dead at Calgary Zoo appeared first on Fish and aquatic news.

]]>
http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/news/lib/49/feed 0
Mysteries of the Colossal Squid Slowly Uncovered http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/news/lib/48 http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/news/lib/48#comments Sun, 04 May 2008 01:18:47 +0000 shalafi04 http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/news/?p=48 Scientists at Te Papa Tongarewa, New Zealand’s national museum, have begun dissection of a colossal female squid this week, already the finds are worth documenting. The largest squid ever captured, is providing scientist with astounding insight into this mysterious creature of the deep. The first noticeable wonder on the over 1,000 pound squid was her eyes. Measuring in at 10.6 […]

The post Mysteries of the Colossal Squid Slowly Uncovered appeared first on Fish and aquatic news.

]]>
Scientists at Te Papa Tongarewa, New Zealand’s national museum, have begun dissection of a colossal female squid this week, already the finds are worth documenting. The largest squid ever captured, is providing scientist with astounding insight into this mysterious creature of the deep. The first noticeable wonder on the over 1,000 pound squid was her eyes. Measuring in at 10.6 inches, just about equal to the size of a soccer ball, they are the largest eyeballs ever recorded for any known animal.

Perhaps the most fascinating thing learned thus far are two rows of bio-luminescent organs, called photophores, located under each eye. Scientists state that the “lights”  are used to mask the squids attack of its prey. All the future meal would see was these small lights coming at it, due to the depth of over 3,000 feet; the lights would shield the squid from sight until it was too late. One problem comes from eating at such depths, most things consumed likely “glow” as well. But the colossal squid has a solution to keep its tummy from becoming a neon sign pointing out its location. The squids mantle (head) is filled with deep dark red pigment that shields any predators or prey from seeing anything within its stomach that might be sending out a glowing warning.

As fish numbers increase in the antarctic so do accidental catching of colossal squid, leaving scientists with the want to set up some form of conservation efforts to protect these mysterious creatures from becoming endangered or worse.

To read this article in its entirity please visit: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2008/05/080501-giant-squid_2.html

The post Mysteries of the Colossal Squid Slowly Uncovered appeared first on Fish and aquatic news.

]]>
http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/news/lib/48/feed 0
Switzerland About to Make Big Changes For Fish http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/news/lib/46 http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/news/lib/46#comments Sat, 03 May 2008 01:10:45 +0000 shalafi04 http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/news/?p=46 Starting September 2008 Switzerland legislation is going to be enforcing some new guidelines to for fish owners.  Aquariums will no longer be allowed to be transparent on all sides, and any fish over 20cm will have to be housed in a tank/pond that meets the size restrictions that will be put into place. The new legislation also speaks of the importance of proper […]

The post Switzerland About to Make Big Changes For Fish appeared first on Fish and aquatic news.

]]>
fish 1 Switzerland About to Make Big Changes For Fish

Starting September 2008 Switzerland legislation is going to be enforcing some new guidelines to for fish owners.  Aquariums will no longer be allowed to be transparent on all sides, and any fish over 20cm will have to be housed in a tank/pond that meets the size restrictions that will be put into place. The new legislation also speaks of the importance of proper maintenance, and water quality, temperature, oxygen levels and salinity should be correct for the individual species being cared for.

Social Fish, to include goldfish, will no longer be able to be kept in a solitary habitat, but will require at least one friend. Forget about freezing your fishy friend or flushing it down the loo. From now on fish keepers will be required to stun the fish before killing it, using a non-prescription narcotic available to the general public.

To read this article in its entirety and see how the new legislation will effect anglers throughout Switzerland visit: http://www.practicalfishkeeping.co.uk/pfk/pages/item.php?news=1671

The post Switzerland About to Make Big Changes For Fish appeared first on Fish and aquatic news.

]]>
http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/news/lib/46/feed 0
Bolivian River Dolphin Recognized as New Species http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/news/lib/45 http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/news/lib/45#comments Wed, 30 Apr 2008 20:18:54 +0000 shalafi04 http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/news/?p=45 The Bolivian Amazon (picture by: Thomas van den Berk) The Bolivian River Dolphin has finally been graced with the acknowledgement that it is, in fact, a separate species from its close relative, the Amazon River Dolphin. Lighter in color, smaller, and having more teeth, are only a few of the things that separate this newly named species apart from the […]

The post Bolivian River Dolphin Recognized as New Species appeared first on Fish and aquatic news.

]]>
amazon Bolivian River Dolphin Recognized as New Species

The Bolivian Amazon (picture by: Thomas van den Berk)

The Bolivian River Dolphin has finally been graced with the acknowledgement that it is, in fact, a separate species from its close relative, the Amazon River Dolphin. Lighter in color, smaller, and having more teeth, are only a few of the things that separate this newly named species apart from the others. It is able to move its head side to side; something other dolphins can not do,  to manuever through flooded forests during heavy rains and flooding.

Unfortunately the Bolivian River Dolphin, like all dolphins, is facing a questionable future do to pollution, fishing, industrialization, damming, and deforestation. 1,500 dolphins are caught and killed each year by fishermen to be used as bait. Hopefully, unlike the newly extinct Yangtze River dolphin in China, the Bolivian River Dolphin will be able to saved by awareness and conservation efforts.

 

for a complete article on the Bolivian River Dolphins visit: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/main.jhtml?xml=/earth/2008/04/29/eadolph129.xml

The post Bolivian River Dolphin Recognized as New Species appeared first on Fish and aquatic news.

]]>
http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/news/lib/45/feed 0
Sturgeon to Find Love in Detroit River http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/news/lib/44 http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/news/lib/44#comments Wed, 30 Apr 2008 19:47:56 +0000 shalafi04 http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/news/?p=44 Detroit Sky Line (picture by: Keith Syvinski) The opportunity to reclaim once flourishing breeding grounds is now looking good for the sturgeon in the Detroit River. These massive fish that live over 100 years and can grow over 7 feet, are being given a helping hand in finding love. Once fished to near extinction, the sturgeon have fought against the […]

The post Sturgeon to Find Love in Detroit River appeared first on Fish and aquatic news.

]]>
detroit Sturgeon to Find Love in Detroit River

Detroit Sky Line (picture by: Keith Syvinski)

The opportunity to reclaim once flourishing breeding grounds is now looking good for the sturgeon in the Detroit River. These massive fish that live over 100 years and can grow over 7 feet, are being given a helping hand in finding love. Once fished to near extinction, the sturgeon have fought against the odds to stay around; the pollution and runoff into the Detroit River however, destroyed their breeding grounds; but now years of Detroit River restoration efforts have finally provided clean water for breeding to be done in. The next step, rebuilding a breeding reef for the sturgeon to lay their eggs and rear their fry. The reef will cost a whopping $178,000, which has been paid for through foundations, the government, and other institutions.

 

To read this article in its entirety visit : http://www.freep.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2008804280360

 

The post Sturgeon to Find Love in Detroit River appeared first on Fish and aquatic news.

]]>
http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/news/lib/44/feed 0
Newcastle’s Fight Against Platy http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/news/lib/43 http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/news/lib/43#comments Tue, 29 Apr 2008 22:00:10 +0000 shalafi04 http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/news/?p=43 picture by: Philipp Rassel Newcastle may be faced with a new threat to its natural species of fish, the platy. Typically a beginner fish, do to their sturdiness, the platys originate from Central America. Recently however, scientists in Australia have found this livebearer infesting their waters. It is especially concerning because their numbers grow quickly, being live-bearers. Platys also eat frogs and fry from […]

The post Newcastle’s Fight Against Platy appeared first on Fish and aquatic news.

]]>
platy Newcastles Fight Against Platy

picture by: Philipp Rassel

Newcastle may be faced with a new threat to its natural species of fish, the platy. Typically a beginner fish, do to their sturdiness, the platys originate from Central America. Recently however, scientists in Australia have found this livebearer infesting their waters. It is especially concerning because their numbers grow quickly, being live-bearers. Platys also eat frogs and fry from fish spawning, leaving native species fighting against a growing tyrant.

Six platy were found in a drain connected to a main water supply in Newcastle; leaving scientist with the concern that they fish have found their way to the dam. If this is the case, it may be too late to control the situation. So how did they get there? Experts believe it is from, what they are now calling, “Finding Nemo Syndrome.” In the movie Finding Nemo by Disney and Pixar Studios, “all drains lead to the ocean.” The movie has led many inexperienced fish owners with the assumption that flushing unwanted fish is a proper way to dispose of them humanely. Thus, people introduce a new, non-native species into the waterways, which can cause major ecosystem troubles for the natives.

For Information on the proper way to dispose of an unwanted fishie friend Read the Article “Don’t Flush that Fish” by Shirlie Sharpe http://freshaquarium.about.com/cs/disease/a/noflush.htm

To read this article in its entirety visit: http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/fish/InNews/threat2008.html

The post Newcastle’s Fight Against Platy appeared first on Fish and aquatic news.

]]>
http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/news/lib/43/feed 0
Science Doing its Part to Protect the North Atlantic Right Whale http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/news/lib/42 http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/news/lib/42#comments Tue, 29 Apr 2008 20:06:26 +0000 shalafi04 http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/news/?p=42 picture provided by: NOAA Ship DELAWARE II Cornell Lab of Ornithology and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution has developed a new Right Whale listening buoy for the Massachusetts Bay. The buoys are designed to recognize the distinctive call of the Atlantic Right Whale which migrates throughout the bay. When heard, the buoys emit a signal to a web-site and marine warning […]

The post Science Doing its Part to Protect the North Atlantic Right Whale appeared first on Fish and aquatic news.

]]>
rightwhale Science Doing its Part to Protect the North Atlantic Right Whale

picture provided by: NOAA Ship DELAWARE II

Cornell Lab of Ornithology and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution has developed a new Right Whale listening buoy for the Massachusetts Bay. The buoys are designed to recognize the distinctive call of the Atlantic Right Whale which migrates throughout the bay. When heard, the buoys emit a signal to a web-site and marine warning system that lets ships know that the whales are in the shipping lanes; thus, they are able to avoid collisions with the endangered species.

These 50 ton ocean wonders were hunted to near extinction, leaving their numbers today, at less than 400 whales. During the winter and spring months the Right Whales gather at the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary; near the Boston Harbor. Over 1,500 vessels pass through this area, and collisions with the whales are the leading cause of the animals deaths each year.

The 10 buoys are placed strategically along the inbound and out going shipping lines. Each buoy has a 5 mile radius of listening and alerts analysts of the whale calls its hearing. This gives the workers time to inform ship captains that the whales are in the area they are headed, with time to avoid accidents. The warning call remains in effect for a 24 hour period after the Right Whales have been detected, to further protect them during times where they are being non-vocal. Ships must slow to 10 knots and post whale/sea turtle look outs during an alert.

The buoy alert system is expected to stay operational for the next 40 years while the Liquefied Natural Gas terminal is expected to stay in business. Hopefully, but protecting the whales now, during this vital time in their attempt to reestablish their numbers, they will still be around for future generations.

You can here the whales live through the public alert website at : http://listenforwhales.org

for the complete article about how buoys are being used to protect the endangered North Atlantic Right Whales visit science daily at: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/04/080428104518.htm

 

The post Science Doing its Part to Protect the North Atlantic Right Whale appeared first on Fish and aquatic news.

]]>
http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/news/lib/42/feed 0
Send in the Seals http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/news/lib/41 http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/news/lib/41#comments Tue, 29 Apr 2008 19:16:22 +0000 shalafi04 http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/news/?p=41 Tagged Seals are helping Australian scientists learn a great deal more about places, in the deep oceans of Antarctica, where they themselves can not travel. This summer 7 female Weddell Seals were tagged to help researchers gather information on the changes global warming is having on the oceans. The Weddell Seal is a constant inhabitant of the Antarctic, and they are now being used by […]

The post Send in the Seals appeared first on Fish and aquatic news.

]]>
antarctica Send in the Seals

Tagged Seals are helping Australian scientists learn a great deal more about places, in the deep oceans of Antarctica, where they themselves can not travel. This summer 7 female Weddell Seals were tagged to help researchers gather information on the changes global warming is having on the oceans. The Weddell Seal is a constant inhabitant of the Antarctic, and they are now being used by an international program monitoring deep diving mammals on both the North and South Pole.

The Seals are fitted with a satellite  transmitter that relays data daily back to the researchers.  The data provides depths of the seals dives, the time they spend under water, and where they are going to eat. But, more importantly, the transmitter also relays vital information about the surrounding oceans; such as water temperatures and salinity of the oceans. So far the salinity of the oceans in the arctic have begun to decline, leaving scientists guessing that melting ice due to global warming is to blame.

However, research is done only in winter, and come spring, the seals molt and the tracking devices fall off. Scientist are planning on several more years of this fascinating seal tagging to help better understand the oceans around us.

You can read the entire article on the Weddell Seal Tagging studies here: http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2008/04/29/2229776.htm

 

picture provided by Creative Commons at:  http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5/

 (disclaimer: Creative Commons has no affiliation to the AC or the views or thoughts published in this article.)

The post Send in the Seals appeared first on Fish and aquatic news.

]]>
http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/news/lib/41/feed 0
Turtle Moves on from a Life of Crime, to a Life of Luxury http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/news/lib/39 http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/news/lib/39#comments Tue, 29 Apr 2008 18:50:18 +0000 shalafi04 http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/news/?p=39 Alligator Snapping Turtles carry a reputation of fear, weighing in at over 200 lbs (90 kg) and packing a bite that earned the word Alligator in its name. Perhaps, the last place you would expect to find such a fearsome reptile, would be in the bustling city of New York. That is unless, like 45lb fluffy, you were housed there […]

The post Turtle Moves on from a Life of Crime, to a Life of Luxury appeared first on Fish and aquatic news.

]]>
AST Turtle Moves on from a Life of Crime, to a Life of Luxury

Alligator Snapping Turtles carry a reputation of fear, weighing in at over 200 lbs (90 kg) and packing a bite that earned the word Alligator in its name. Perhaps, the last place you would expect to find such a fearsome reptile, would be in the bustling city of New York. That is unless, like 45lb fluffy, you were housed there to protect the illegal drugs of your owner. Fluffy was rescued during a Long Island drug raid. Since his rescue, he has been relocated to a New England Aquarium as an attraction for their new Killer Instincts exhibit.

So, while Fluffy’s owner may be facing some hard time in the big house, Fluffy will be living a care free life in a turtle appropriate and drug-free environment. Congratulations Fluffy.

For more information on Alligator Snapping Turtles and a picture of Fluffy visit: http://www.practicalfishkeeping.co.uk/pfk/pages/item.php?news=1669

picture provided by Creative Commons at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5/.

 (disclaimer: Creative Commons has no affiliation to the AC or the views or thoughts published in this article.)

The post Turtle Moves on from a Life of Crime, to a Life of Luxury appeared first on Fish and aquatic news.

]]>
http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/news/lib/39/feed 0