Fish news
Fish news
 
Below are 's Articles:
Sea Life London Aquarium weans gourami off Kit Kats
Kitkat

When a 4 kilogram pet gourami named Gary was moved to the Sea Life London Aquarium, he went on a hunger strike and refused to eat the fruit given to him. Eventually, the aquarium staff found out why he was shunning the natural diet of a gourami – Gary had been raised on Kit Kats only.

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Native American tribes strive to save the lamprey
lamprey

Lamprey used to be an important source of food for Native American tribes living along the northwestern coast of North America, and the fish was once upon a time harvested in ample amounts from rivers throughout the Columbia Basin, from Oregon to Canada.

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Radioactive strontium-90 found in fish in Vermont, USA

Vermont health officials have found radioactive strontium-90 in a smallmouth bass taken from the Connecticut River.

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Gold Nugget pleco and Mango pleco finally described by science

Two pleco species from the Xingu River drainage that are popular within the aquarium hobby have finally been scientifically described and given scientific names.

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Will grey seals counteract cod recovery in the Baltic Sea?

Grey seals and cod used to be found in great abundance throughout the Baltic Sea, but today the seals are chiefly present in the northern parts of the sea while the cod is found in the south.

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Hilton stops serving sailfish and marlin in Costa Rica

Four Hilton Worldwide hotels in Costa Rica have pledged to stop serving sailfish and marlin after entering into an agreement with the Billfish Foundation (TBF) and the Costa Rica Sport Fishing Federation (FECOPT).

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China Releases 1.3 Billion Fish into Yangtze River

Last week, 1.3 billion fish were released into the Yangtze River by the Chinese Ministry of Agriculture (MOA). The release took place in the provinces of Jiangxi, Hubei, Hunan, Anhui and Jiangsu in the middle and lower reaches of the river.

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New species of Brazilian killifish described by science
Rivulus albae

A new species of killifish native to Brazil has been formally described and given a scientific name. The fish, from now on known as Rivulus albae, belongs to the subgenus Melanorivulus and was found in soft and acidic water in northeastern Brazil.

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The mystery of bonefish spawning solved

The Bonefish is an extremely popular fishing that lures 1000s of sport fishermen to try their luck each year but until now it has been unknown how this species reproduce. Andy Danylchuk, a researcher working at University of Massachusetts Amherst and his colleagues have been studying bonefish for the last few years using using ultrasonic transmitters to tag and track the fishes movements. The research have been conducted outside Bahamas. The results can now be found in the online version of journal Marine Biology.

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Will a third force field be enough to protect the Great Lakes?

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers have constructed an electric barrier in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal, a waterway linking the Mississippi River with the Great Lakes watershed. The idea is to prevent Asian carps from entering the Great Lakes where it could wreck havoc with the ecosystem.

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First census finds fewer White Sharks than expected in northeast Pacific Ocean
White shark

A team of researchers headed by Taylor Chapple, a UC Davis doctoral student, has made the first rigorous scientific estimate of White shark (Carcharodon carcharias) numbers in the northeast Pacific Ocean.

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Aquarium calamity – are you prepared?
Photo Dr P Andreas Svensson

Many pet owners purchase pet insurance for their dogs, cats, horses etcetera but have you ever thought about the insurance needs of your aquarium? While few insurance companies would let you take out a life insurance policy on a guppy or be willing to pay for gold fish surgery, there are other types of insurance that any aquarium owner should consider.

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Hagfish absorb food directly through its skin

Hagfish, an elongated scavenger found on the bottom of the sea, is truly a weird and wonderful creature. A single fossil of hagfish shows that is has undergone little evolutionary change in the last 300 million years, and the hagfish is believed to the be oldest living connection to the first vertebrate.

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Are you an “off the beaten path” kind of traveler?
Trash gyre location and currents

For those who wish to boldly go where just a handful of researchers has gone before, the Algalita Marine Research Foundation is now offering tickets to visit the Great Pacific Garbage Gyre.

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Florida researchers use satellites to find out more about the elusive Hammerhead shark
Hammerhead shark

Using satellite tag technology, research assistant professor Neil Hammerschlag and his colleagues have tracked a hammerhead shark during 62 days, as it journeyed from the southern coast of Florida to the middle of the Atlantic off the coast of New Jersey.

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