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Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 21
  1. #11

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Your answer could lie in the lack of iodine. These corals need sufficient iodine in their water. A lack of iodine can result in polyp flesh separating from the skeleton.

    Emerald Crabs are not typically predatory and don't typically bother corals.
    Considering a Marine Aquarium? A Breakdown of the Components, Live Rock, Cycling a Marine Tank

    "The capacity to learn is a gift; The ability to learn is a skill; The WILLINGNESS to learn is a choice." - Unknown

  2. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    How do I measure for iodine. I use a good salt for water changes and use Instant Ocean Reef Crystals as well as a "Hagen" test kit.

  3. #13

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    How often do you do water changes? I'll grant you that IO Reef Crystals is better than regular IO, but it is IMO still lacking. You can get much better salts for the same price.
    Considering a Marine Aquarium? A Breakdown of the Components, Live Rock, Cycling a Marine Tank

    "The capacity to learn is a gift; The ability to learn is a skill; The WILLINGNESS to learn is a choice." - Unknown

  4. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I change water once per month. Sorry but I don't know what IMO is.

  5. #15

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    IMO = In My Opinion

    You got some great advice so far.

    Did you ever see you emerald crab craweling over your brain. Crabs typically will not hurt corals, but they have been known to walk across them on there way to look for food. This can stress out the coral. As a rule, I don't keep anything with pointy feet in my reef tanks just for that reason.
    If you take your time to do the research FIRST, you can successfully set-up and keep ANY type of aquarium with ease.
    "Not using a quarantine tank is like playing Russian roulette. Nobody wins the game, some people just get to play longer than others." - Anthony Calfo
    Fishless Cycle Cycling with Fish Marine Aquarium Info [URL="http://saltwater.aquaticcommunity.com/"]

  6. #16

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    With just monthly water changes and no iodine dosing, your coral may well have let go of it's skeleton for that reason alone. The monthly water change schedule is likely fine, providing your NO3 levels are staying low, but I would recommend if you are going to keep that schedule you start replenishing the minerals in your tank through a good dosing regime.
    Considering a Marine Aquarium? A Breakdown of the Components, Live Rock, Cycling a Marine Tank

    "The capacity to learn is a gift; The ability to learn is a skill; The WILLINGNESS to learn is a choice." - Unknown

  7. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I have begun to dose with iodine today. I hope this answers lots of other questions I have. I started last November 2011 to keep corals. It has not been pleasant. Lots of money spent and little to show for it. I read constantly but it is difficult to fine information that is not "selling" something. Thank you for attending to my post.

  8. #18

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by mightyfinelady
    I started last November 2011 to keep corals.
    Have you had this trachyphyllia since that time or is it a more recent acquisition?

    Quote Originally Posted by mightyfinelady
    The tank is 75 gallon bow front; up for over five years. Parameters before a 20% water change as of yesterday:
    NH3-0mg
    NO3-.5mg
    pH-8.1
    NO2-.1mg
    CA-460mg
    PO4-1mg
    dKH-90
    I'm assuming for alkalinity you meant 90ppm (90 dKH is astronomically high).

    An alkalinity of 90ppm (=5dKH) is very low for a reef aquarium, I think, and may be the primary contributing factor).

    What other stony corals do you have?
    African cichlid and saltwater aquariums

    http://www.rowelab.com/AquaControlle...9&scope=last24

  9. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Idodine dosing is too hit and miss for keeping safe levels. You would be far better served with a weekly 10% water change to keep trace elements safe. Dosing is largely unnecasary with small weekly water changes unless you have quite a few sps . Dosing anything is illadvised unless you are testing for it specifically. Phosphates being high will also inhibit cal uptake and cause stony corals to stop growing skeleton. Phos being so difficult to accuratly test for means you could have the amount you state or 5 times higher then that. Good luck,its never as simple as just starting to dose,only bad things happen quick with reefing.

  10. #20

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by smaug
    You would be far better served with a weekly 10% water change to keep trace elements safe.
    Not necessarily. There is a reason IO salt (which is what the OP is using) is known to be weak in the trace elements. The idea of iodine dosing being "too hit and miss for keeping safe levels" is also one that is a matter of opinion. Some do it an swear by it, others do it and don't think it does anything. The only facts not really in dispute is that iodine is a necessity for your reef, and that your inverts use it. That being the case, it stands to reason that it will need to be replenished, and that the more inverts you have that are using it then faster it will be used. In reality, dosing doesn't keep it in your system for very long either (some say as little as 72 hours) but it is long enough to have an effect.

    Dosing anything is illadvised unless you are testing for it specifically.
    IMO, that doesn't really apply to all elements in your tank. The major ones like Ca, and Mg sure, but not things like Iodine. As long as you are sensible about it, and only dose small amounts at infrequent intervals, you will be fine.
    Considering a Marine Aquarium? A Breakdown of the Components, Live Rock, Cycling a Marine Tank

    "The capacity to learn is a gift; The ability to learn is a skill; The WILLINGNESS to learn is a choice." - Unknown

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