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Results 1 to 10 of 12
  1. Default Do mbuna like current


    0 Not allowed!
    Just curious, I had a community tank set up, and I noticed the fish didn't like to go near the end with the filter exhaust, even after I aimed the nozzles up and against the glass. It's a powerful filter too. I was wondering if mbuna like the current, or should I keep it aimed the same?

  2. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Mbunas are from the shallow parts of the lake Malawi which I'm pretty sure has a lot of current/waves.
    Da name's Paul. Not Dave. ROFL

    Learn to give and take. That's how things should always work.

  3. #3

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Lake Malawi is the second deepest lake in Africa. There are very few areas of really shallow water. There is a couple of rivers feeding the lake, but I have my doubts whether there would be a great deal of current all of the time. I know from my experience with African Cichlids, that they really don't like a lot of current in their tank. I've found that if there's too much current in the tank, they will very rarely venture out from amoungst the rocks to swim in the open areas.
    Three-fourths of the Earth's surface is water, and one-fourth is land. It is quite clear that the good Lord intended us to spend triple the amount of time fishing as taking care of the lawn. ~Chuck Clark

  4. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by pjaldave
    Mbunas are from the shallow parts of the lake Malawi which I'm pretty sure has a lot of current/waves.

    Quote Originally Posted by escamosa
    Lake Malawi is the second deepest lake in Africa. There are very few areas of really shallow water. There is a couple of rivers feeding the lake, but I have my doubts whether there would be a great deal of current all of the time. I know from my experience with African Cichlids, that they really don't like a lot of current in their tank. I've found that if there's too much current in the tank, they will very rarely venture out from amoungst the rocks to swim in the open areas.

    Conflicting "opinions"...anyone know for sure either way please?

    I'm only sticking my nose in as I'm planning on Mbunas for my 2nd 67G tank.

  5. #5

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I would personally go with escamosa's advice as he's actually had experience with them - sorry Paul : )
    46 gal fw tank with black skirt tetras, neon tetras, spotted corys, cherry barbs, otoclinus, snails & 4 amano shrimp - plastic & live plants
    5 gal QT
    Remember: Our job is to take care of the water our fish live in

  6. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by andreahp
    I would personally go with escamosa's advice as he's actually had experience with them - sorry Paul : )

    Thank you.

  7. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by escamosa
    Lake Malawi is the second deepest lake in Africa. There are very few areas of really shallow water. There is a couple of rivers feeding the lake, but I have my doubts whether there would be a great deal of current all of the time. I know from my experience with African Cichlids, that they really don't like a lot of current in their tank. I've found that if there's too much current in the tank, they will very rarely venture out from amoungst the rocks to swim in the open areas.

    Quote Originally Posted by andreahp
    I would personally go with escamosa's advice as he's actually had experience with them - sorry Paul : )

    have just read this:

    Mbunas appreciate lots of flow, they even enjoy swimming in it like it is a game.

    taken from an article about Mbunas on this forum:
    http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/cichlid/mbuna.php


  8. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I do have experiene with them but not too much, just had them early august. But so far, they are swimming with the current that i have in the tank. I have a koralia 1050 btw.

    I say they like to have current, but as ecsamosa said, they don't like TOO MUCH. Just not sure how much is too much.
    Da name's Paul. Not Dave. ROFL

    Learn to give and take. That's how things should always work.

  9. #9

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I can honestly say, that all of the Africans that I have do enjoy SOME flow. But they don't like LOTS of flow. I have two filters on my African tank, both turning the tank over about 11 or so times an hour. Now, if I run those filters to their full potential, it creates a fair bit of current, and the Africans actually hate it! They lose a bit of their colour, and you hardly ever see them come out from around the rocks. So I have one of my filters flow turned down to about half or so. This way, they have a bit of current up one end of the tank, and very little down the other. And I still find that they prefer the end with less current.

    Don't forget that you can make additions to a tank that can make the environment a little more natural for the fishes, but once those fishes are in a tank, it's still leaps and bounds away from their true natural environment. They've gone from a massive area, from both Lake Malawi and breeding ponds, and are being put in a tank. The current in a tank is naturally going to be very strong because it's a small area and the fishes have less areas to get away from it if they need to rest, so you really have to work on adjusting it to suit your fishes.
    Last edited by escamosa; 09-05-2012 at 09:01 PM.
    Three-fourths of the Earth's surface is water, and one-fourth is land. It is quite clear that the good Lord intended us to spend triple the amount of time fishing as taking care of the lawn. ~Chuck Clark

  10. #10

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by escamosa
    I can honestly say, that all of the Africans that I have do enjoy SOME flow. But they don't like LOTS of flow. I have two filters on my African tank, both turning the tank over about 11 or so times an hour. Now, if I run those filters to their full potential, it creates a fair bit of current, and the Africans actually hate it! They lose a bit of their colour, and you hardly ever see them come out from around the rocks. So I have one of my filters flow turned down to about half or so. This way, they have a bit of current up one end of the tank, and very little down the other. And I still find that they prefer the end with less current.

    Don't forget that you can make additions to a tank that can make the environment a little more natural for the fishes, but once those fishes are in a tank, it's still leaps and bounds away from their true natural environment. They've gone from a massive area, from both Lake Malawi and breeding ponds, and are being put in a tank. The current in a tank is naturally going to be very strong because it's a small area and the fishes have less areas to get away from it if they need to rest, so you really have to work on adjusting it to suit your fishes.

    Just curious as to what experience you have with African Cichlid tanks, what size tanks you have, and how many years you have kept cichlids.
    55 Gl: 15 African Cichlids, 2 Synodontis -
    Filters - Aquaclear 110 and PennPlax 700
    Watch a Video of My Cichlid Aquarium!

    29 Gl: 1 Black Moor, 1 Fantail Goldfish -
    Filters - Aquaclear 70
    Watch a Video of My Goldfish Aquarium!

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