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Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Fish vs. Corals

  1. Default Fish vs. Corals


    0 Not allowed!
    I have a chance to buy a 200 gallon reef tank (300lbs of live rock, 300 lbs of live sand, a mated pair of maroon clownfish, 2 refugiums, metal halides lights and T-5′s, a clam the size of a watermelon, a few starfish, some coral). I am somewhat experienced with freshwater tanks, but have never had a saltwater.

    If I buy the tank, I think I want to put more fish in it. However, I have read that when considering a saltwater setup, it is best to go either mostly fish or mostly corals (see below for the fish vs corals comment). Anybody have any advice?

    Thanks in advance for your help.

    --------------------------------------------------

    “You have to decide before hand if you want a fish tank or a reef tank. Don’t try to both in the same tank. The more fish you have have, the harder it will be to properly balance the nutrient equation. Add too many fish and you will most likely have either an algea problem or end up starving everything in order to keep the algea at bay.”

  2. #2

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    When I set-up my first SW tank, I had corals in it within 2 months of setting it up. Nothing bad happen to me

    IMO, if your willing to take the time to research first, you will be fine. There is more to learn in a reef tank, but in my experiance it's not very hard to learn nor did I find it difficult.

    I would suggest doing some resarch first and decide which is best for you

    Edit, if you have too many fish, you will have problems reguardless if you have corals or not
    Last edited by Cliff; 07-22-2012 at 03:01 PM.
    If you take your time to do the research FIRST, you can successfully set-up and keep ANY type of aquarium with ease.
    "Not using a quarantine tank is like playing Russian roulette. Nobody wins the game, some people just get to play longer than others." - Anthony Calfo
    Fishless Cycle Cycling with Fish Marine Aquarium Info [URL="http://saltwater.aquaticcommunity.com/"]

  3. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    If you have no experiance with sw or reef systems then do that tank a favor and dont buy it. Let it go to someone with the experiance to give it justice. Reefkeeping is nothing like fw,the pitfalls are many and mostly unseen unless you have been there. There are many here who will tell you its "easier" then fw,nothing could be further from the truth.

  4. Default Geez Smaug, what a grump


    0 Not allowed!
    Just kidding...It is true that I am a little intimidated by such a dramtic change in responsibility, but I thought that I would use a service for a few months to get me through my learning curve.

    I am not too worried about the day to day maintenance tasks. What concerns me is that I may not recognize when things are going south and then have too much damage before I am able to correct it.

    Any further thoughts?

    BTW, thanks to both of you and Cliff for your feedback.

  5. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Consider me the voice of reasonable caution. Grump,,,,why not that is why I chose my user name a while back. Your right about the not seeing what's goin wrong til its too late,nothing happens fast with a reef unless its bad then its too late. If you can afford the service to get you started then that would be the way to go. My thoughts on it still say you should pass and let it go to someone who knows what there doing.

  6. #6

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Which ever path you choose to take, research and not cutting corners will be key to your success.

    I would like to echo Smaug's comments not to feel pressured to take this deal. Other deals will come along if you feel your not ready right now.

    Just my $0.02
    If you take your time to do the research FIRST, you can successfully set-up and keep ANY type of aquarium with ease.
    "Not using a quarantine tank is like playing Russian roulette. Nobody wins the game, some people just get to play longer than others." - Anthony Calfo
    Fishless Cycle Cycling with Fish Marine Aquarium Info [URL="http://saltwater.aquaticcommunity.com/"]

  7. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I say, the price is a factor!

    As other said you don't want to jump into something and then realize its not what you expected (for any reason)

    if its a VERY good deal and you are CONFIDANCE you like SW then read some reviews and buy it, you can spent more time research as you go (also sometimes you can't just research, you need hand on experiences as well)

    if the deal is not that great, regardless wait for more studies about salt water keeping.


    -----
    As wether to keep more of fish or coral.
    Many consider corals to offer more beauty! I would say its a personal choice! Spent a good care and careful selection either way looks gorgeous. (ie you might see amazing fish only tank compared to less carefully created Coral tank, and vise versa)


    P.S since corals are more delicate you may want to avoid buying them (or try to sell them) and start over with fish only which is easier to keep.
    But bare in mind selling tank system is not easy so if you buy it you are kind of stuck into it!

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    3,758

    Awards Showcase

    Why thank-you - Cliff The grammar crab has you in its grasp! D: - Trillianne Thanks for the clarification - Mith A few clown for the fellow SW clowns. :D - ILuvMyGoldBarb sorry about your angelfish - smaug 
    Many cultures donw through the ages have known that Ice cream is the perfect band-aid for all occasions. ~  Sorry for your loss. - 850R Here's some Christmass Cheer, Happy Holidays Sheamurai - Cliff merry xmas, keep good care of him - genocidex Beer! The perfect gift for any occasion - Merry Chrismas! - 850R I'm glad your here and a active forum member - Cliff 
    penguin for a friend XD - genocidex Thanks for the help with that spammer !!! - Cliff Thank you for the kind words - Cliff Merry Christmas - Cliff To help you re-stock the tank - Cliff 
    Discus and Beer! - Sandz To Discus Days!!! - JudiJetson For very clear advice! - houdini56 Happy Holidays! - Rue Happy Easter! - Slaphppy7 

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    In one aspect, reef IS the same as freshwater - research what you want to buy before you put it in your tank. There is no rule about more fish=less corals or vice versa - but it looks that way because many fish are not reef safe - meaning they nip or eat corals. Obviously, if you have expensive corals or favourites, this is a Bad Thing. But there is no ratio of fish to corals. You stock your tank however you like so long as you've researched compatibility with corals and fish you have or plan to have.

    As far as the deal goes, there's always another deal around the next corner, so you don't really need to jump on this one unless there is a unique creature in there you've fallen for.

    As the tank is established (tho the move will disrupt things a bit) and bigger tanks are easier to keep, and you plan on using a service for a while, you should be ok. So long as you don't mind shelling out the dough for the service while you get a handle on reef water chemistry and plumbing, and emergency calls, you're all good. A thought - to make sure you are getting a good set-up, perhaps bring the service with you to see the tank? An experienced person might be able to tell you if the tank is sound and the inhabitants healthy or not before you buy.

    Let us know what you decide!

  9. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    So, I looked at the tank and it was NOT as advertised. I decided to pass on it as it did not look very well kept.

    However, I found another deal on a 250gal bow front that is currently set up for freshwater. I pick it up this weekend. In the short term, I am going to use it to replace my current 55 gal community tank and "give" the 55 to my nephew to replace his 30 gal goldfish tank. I assume I will get it back next year some time as the goldfish and koi outgrow the tank (or worse).

    My strategy for the 250 is to get it ready to eventually accomodate a mixed saltwater environment. To that end, I thought I should get it drilled and put in a Beananimal/Calfo overflow. I assume that a sump/fuge for a saltwater would work for a freshwater, so as long as I keep the future in mind and build toward it.

    Any comments and/or recommendations for bulkhead size, custom sump, etc., would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks for the advice so far.

    Phlppt

  10. #10

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    That sounds like a good approach. Take it slow and learn before setting up a marine tank

    The size of the bulkhead would depend on the flow you want and the number of drain lines and return lines you would want. Something like two 1.5" drain lines and 2 or 4, 1" return lines would likely do it. The below links can help you decied how to set up a sump and the last on how to put it all together.

    http://saltwater.aquaticcommunity.co...e-sump-basics/

    http://saltwater.aquaticcommunity.co...umbing-basics/
    Last edited by Cliff; 08-02-2012 at 12:53 AM.
    If you take your time to do the research FIRST, you can successfully set-up and keep ANY type of aquarium with ease.
    "Not using a quarantine tank is like playing Russian roulette. Nobody wins the game, some people just get to play longer than others." - Anthony Calfo
    Fishless Cycle Cycling with Fish Marine Aquarium Info [URL="http://saltwater.aquaticcommunity.com/"]

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