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Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15
  1. Default Green Water Algae Help Needed


    0 Not allowed!
    My tank is suffering from green water pretty badly right now. I was wondering what is the easiest way to combat it. I've heard multiple ways and was wondering what everyone else would do.

    Right now I'm leaning towards a 3 day blackout but I've also heard that you should do a 4 day blackout instead, and one site said 5 days! Is this just to be safe and make sure you killed all of it? I don't really want to have a black lawn garbage bag over my tank for 5 days but if that's what it takes I can give it a try.

    I've also heard that diatom filters and UV sterilizers work but I do not have access to either. Chemicals to get rid of algae are also not something I want to do as I've heard they can harm fish as well.

    One site I was reading said that they got rid of their green water by cover the top of the tank heavily with floating plants and adding Easy Life FFM (which I've never heard of and cannot find any other information on). So I was wondering if there was a product like that that I could use and just add a bunch of floating plants?

    Right now I'm leaning towards a heavy cleaning of my sand, 50% water change, 3 day blackout, followed by another large water change (50-75%).

    The lighting I have is a T5 NO 24 watt fluorescent 6500K single bulb. Water parameters are the following:
    ph 6.6
    ammonia 0
    nitrite 0
    nitrate 10
    KH 0-1 (really hard to tell, first drop in is yellow, don't get any blue at all as the test says I will)

    I have tried large water changes and it helps for a day or two and then it is just as green as before. Been green ever since my substrate change about a week and a half ago.

  2. #2

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    The blackout will get rid of the algae for sure, but the lack of black outs is not what caused it to begin with so it will come back.

    IME, algae is always caused by a combination of too much light and nutrients in the water (nitrates and/or phosphates).

    What type of lighting do you have? Does your tank get any direct sunlight? Have you tested for phosphates? When you say you tried larger water changes, how larger and how often were they?

    Sorry for all the questions, just trying to help here
    Last edited by Cliff; 06-28-2012 at 09:25 PM.
    If you take your time to do the research FIRST, you can successfully set-up and keep ANY type of aquarium with ease.
    "Not using a quarantine tank is like playing Russian roulette. Nobody wins the game, some people just get to play longer than others." - Anthony Calfo
    Fishless Cycle Cycling with Fish Marine Aquarium Info [URL="http://saltwater.aquaticcommunity.com/"]

  3. #3

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    First thing to try, is simply turn off the lights. Water changes don't help much, as the influx of new water seems to make the algae left behind happier and multiply rapidly. I've found sometimes keeping the lights off after a water change makes all the difference. You can entirely black out the tank if you like, but I've never had to be that extreme. Keep the lights out for a few days or until the algae is gone. After that, tone down your light schedule.

    You are right to not want to use chemicals, if you have live plants it will likely melt them, and its rough on the fish.
    2 10 gallon tanks, 1 20 gallon tank, 1 Fluval Edge, 1 29 gallon tank, and one backyard pond.

  4. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    My tank is near a window but it has the shades pulled on it all day so it may get a little bit of light coming through the shades but as far as I can tell it doesn't get any direct sunlight.

    I have not tested for phosphates and do not have a kit to test for phosphates. Should I get one?

    T5 NO 24" fluorescent bulb 6500K I keep it on for 9 hours every day.

    My large water changes were 50% and then another 50% 3 days later.

    I think the cause of it was when I was removing my old gravel there was leftover food and fish waste in the gravel that got stirred around and ruined the remaining water. Then when I refilled the tank it didn't look bad right away but then slowly got worse and kept coming back every time I would change the water.

    It is a 20 gallon planted tank that is pretty much fully stocked.

    Thanks for the quick response. Do you need any other info?
    Last edited by ryann; 06-28-2012 at 09:37 PM.

  5. #5

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Unless you have nitrates in your tap water, extra 50 to 75% water changes will help to get things undercontroll. Every second or third day should do. You have to remember, in reality, your nitrate levels are likely higher than your test results show as it can not factor in the amount of nitrates being consumed by the green algae. Removing the food sourse will starve the algae off.

    Cut back on the lighting as well for now until you get things under control. The last time I had a algae problem, extra water changes were the key along with reduced lighting and being carful not to overfeed

    Don't go a buy a phosphate test kit yet, lets see if the above actions work first.
    If you take your time to do the research FIRST, you can successfully set-up and keep ANY type of aquarium with ease.
    "Not using a quarantine tank is like playing Russian roulette. Nobody wins the game, some people just get to play longer than others." - Anthony Calfo
    Fishless Cycle Cycling with Fish Marine Aquarium Info [URL="http://saltwater.aquaticcommunity.com/"]

  6. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by Cliff
    Unless you have nitrates in your tap water, extra 50 to 75% water changes will help to get things undercontrol.
    My tap water actually has 40ppm nitrates so I have to haul water from a grocery store. I take 5 gallon buckets and they have a spout that I can fill them and they charge per gallon. Its filtered water with no nitrates unlike my tap water, but it makes it quite difficult to do water changes constantly. I guess I'll just have to make a couple more trips to the grocery store this week. My lights are out right now and I'm planning on leaving them out until at least Sunday. I'll do a 50% water change tomorrow.

    Anything else I should do?

  7. #7

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Dang, 40ppm in your tap water is awful

    I would suggest to do what you are planning to do, and see the result first. I would consider some more plants to help with the nitrates.
    If you take your time to do the research FIRST, you can successfully set-up and keep ANY type of aquarium with ease.
    "Not using a quarantine tank is like playing Russian roulette. Nobody wins the game, some people just get to play longer than others." - Anthony Calfo
    Fishless Cycle Cycling with Fish Marine Aquarium Info [URL="http://saltwater.aquaticcommunity.com/"]

  8. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Yeah, I live in an area with lots of farmland and all of the fertilizers that they use makes the nitrates in our water pretty high.

    The ph in my tap water is also pretty bad (around 8.4) so I really cannot use it at all with my fish. I've never really had a problem with nitrates using the other water and the ph is much lower (6.6). I just added a bunch of plants about a week ago. Here's a picture of it right now. Should I buy more or just wait until what I have grows and spreads? I do want a pretty heavily planted tank so I picked plants that produce runners like vals and sagittaria subulata and also watersprite and water wisteria that can grow like crazy. Do you think I should get more or just wait for them to grow more? Also, is there a way that I can use my tap water even with the ridiculous ph?
    Attached Images Attached Images

  9. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    And here I am trying to get this stuff to colonize so I can feed it to my albino angelfish fry.

    I think I'm going to go get a bag of fertilizer and put it out in a tank in the hot sun.

  10. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    So far I've had no light on for a day and a half and I covered the side of my tank facing the window with a towel. I took a peak in and it looked even worse than before.

    I hope this works. Its really getting on my nerves but I know nothing good happens fast so I'll wait it out another day or two and see what happens.

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