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Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1

    Default Questions for the experts -- 0 NitrAte, Filmy water, changing pH...


    0 Not allowed!
    I've been in this hobby 6 months now and I've still got so much to learn. Never before has any hobby or activity given me so much simple pleasure. I never would have thought that I would enjoy water changes and the constant maintenance of keeping fish. And I have so much to thank everyone here at Aquatic Community for. :) Thanks for always being friendly, helpful and supportive. It's a real pleasure to be part of this wonderful forum.

    Now onto my questions.

    First of all, the water in my 30G neon tank has a sort of film on the surface. It breaks when I touch it and reminds me sort of of oil on the surface of a body of water. It's really weird. Its been there pretty much the whole time the tank has been set up, and I never really thought about the fact that it's probably not normal. I don't think it's harmful, because like I said it's been there for ages and with no effect. I've never lost a single fish in that tank -- inhabitants are 25 neons, 6 kuhli loaches and a BN plec. It is also heavily (like more-plants-than-water heavily) planted. There is not a lot of movement on the waters surface because the filter out-take pump is below the surface and the plants dull the current. I have also never seen the fish gulping at the surface as they might if there was low oxygen in the water. Water parameters are as follows:

    AMMONIA: 0 NITRITE: 0 NITRATE: 5 pH: 6.6.
    The last water change was about a week ago, so as you can see it doesn't create a lot of waste. Pretty balanced system.

    Any idea what it might be, and if it is dangerous?



    Question 2: I have a 5.5G tank with one male betta and NO filter. The filter that was on it was too strong and knocked him around so I removed it and I never really got around to getting a sponge filter. It Is planted with ambulia, the water appears crystal-clear and water parameters are ALWAYS as follows:

    AMMONIA: 0 NITRITE: 0 NITRATE: 0 pH: 7
    No matter how many water changes I do (or don't do) the parameters are all always nil and the water sparkling -- I assume because of the plants. I do one or two 30% water changes a week.

    Do I need a filter?


    Final question for the day, folks: I have driftwood in all my tanks because I like the way it looks. I didn't realise til way after I added it that it brought the pH way down. Although it ended up working alright because all the fish I like do better in acidic water anyway. Parameters in my 70G are usually:

    AMONNIA: 0 NITRITE: 0 NITRATE: >10 pH: 6.6
    Immediately after a water change today I decided to test the pH, and the result was 7.2. An hour later I checked again and it was 6.8. I then checked water straight out of the tap and it was about 7.4. So, water is going into the tank slightly above neutral and being taken down to acidic by the driftwood. This seems like a pretty big leap in pH to me. I feel stupid and guilty that I hadn't picked up on this sooner.

    Is this fluctuation in pH enough to harm my fish?


    Thanks in advance. Sorry, I know it's a lot of questions.

  2. #2

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Oil from the fish food. Add an airstone or increase the filtering to break it up so the filter can pull it out. You can dab the water surface with a paper towel too.

  3. #3

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by ameliaaahx
    Question 2: I have a 5.5G tank with one male betta and NO filter. The filter that was on it was too strong and knocked him around so I removed it and I never really got around to getting a sponge filter. It Is planted with ambulia, the water appears crystal-clear and water parameters are ALWAYS as follows:

    AMMONIA: 0 NITRITE: 0 NITRATE: 0 pH: 7
    No matter how many water changes I do (or don't do) the parameters are all always nil and the water sparkling -- I assume because of the plants. I do one or two 30% water changes a week.
    I'll take this one. :D I think the water parameters answers the question for you. You are doing water changes, you have plants, and you still have all 0s. A filter is only going to add water movement, and not much else. Your plants are obviously using any waste being produced by your fish, and those same plants are also providing oxygen exchange (not overly important for a fish that can breath air) thus keeping CO2 down and oxygen up. It's not broken, don't fix it. ;)
    Considering a Marine Aquarium? A Breakdown of the Components, Live Rock, Cycling a Marine Tank

    "The capacity to learn is a gift; The ability to learn is a skill; The WILLINGNESS to learn is a choice." - Unknown

  4. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by ameliaaahx

    Any idea what it might be, and if it is dangerous?
    I hadn't heard of it possibly being fish food oil before but that makes sense. I have this problem too with my riparium. Any tank that doesn't have allot of surface flow will have it to some extent. Its just stuff left over from evaporation, unless the water is distilled already any undisturbed evaporating water will have a film.
    Quote Originally Posted by ameliaaahx
    Do I need a filter?
    +1 to ILuvMyGoldBarb, nope.
    Quote Originally Posted by ameliaaahx
    Is this fluctuation in pH enough to harm my fish?
    Its not possible for your driftwood to change the ph of 70g of water in an hour. More then likely you got your test water from the tank before the tap water from the water change had mixed with the tank water thoroughly and you got a pocket of tap.

  5. #5

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Thanks so much guys. :)

    Its not possible for your driftwood to change the ph of 70g of water in an hour. More then likely you got your test water from the tank before the tap water from the water change had mixed with the tank water thoroughly and you got a pocket of tap.
    Okay, but is this risky to the fish at all?

  6. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by ameliaaahx
    Thanks so much guys. :)



    Okay, but is this risky to the fish at all?

    I don't think so, you can mix the tank with your arm a couple times if your real worried about it, but your filter is mixing it up pretty good. For the fishes sake I don't think its really any different from when they get a hard rain the wild.

  7. #7

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I don't think its really any different from when they get a hard rain the wild.
    Makes sense when you put it that way. Thanks a heap, guys. :)

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