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Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. Exclamation I Need albino cory catfish breeding tips


    0 Not allowed!
    Well I just need tips on how to breed my albino cory catfish I'm just not sure what to do and I need more facts about them

  2. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    My mom breeds these guys. The following works for her.

    Step 1: Verify that you have at least one male and one female.
    Step 2: An area (not full tank though) of high current.
    Step 3: Wait. My mom's cories take anywhere from a few weeks to a few months to lay the eggs. For best results, keep the water in pristine condition, and make sure not to stress out the cories.
    IMPORTANT NOTE: NEVER separate the female from the male in a breeding pair. The female becomes stressed and can become egg-bound.

    Once they finally lay eggs:

    Step 4: Remove parents or remove eggs. Whichever floats your boat. You want the eggs somewhere that nothing can eat them. Everything eats them, even shrimp. So if you use a breeding tank, removing parents works. If not, remove eggs to a breeding net or something. Carefully scrape eggs off of glass with a razor.
    Step 5: Put eggs in flow of the high current. This prevents fungus from attacking the eggs, and IME makes a much higher success rate in getting the babies to hatch. Hatching occurs 5-10days afterwards.

    Once they hatch:
    - Make sure they dont get sucked up by the filter. Put a prefilter sponge or a mesh bag over the filter input.
    - Feed special fry food until they start to turn pink. When they are hatched they are white and barely visible, with red eyes. They start to look like cories and thats when we start feeding them small amounts of shrimp pellets or whatever you normally feed your cories.
    When they are big enough that they are bigger than the biggest fish in the tank they are going in's mouth, they are ready to be moved to their new home. Or given to a fish store. Takes about a month for my mom.

    Hope this helps! Good Luck!
    10gal Betta Tank - Skye the crowntail and Squiggles the deformed albino cory
    10gal Tank- Glofish
    75gal- Everything

  3. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    OK thanks alot!! But don't I have to do water change or something to simulate raining season??

  4. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    she doesnt. idk if maybe that might make them breed faster.
    10gal Betta Tank - Skye the crowntail and Squiggles the deformed albino cory
    10gal Tank- Glofish
    75gal- Everything

  5. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Oh ok well thanks alot!!

  6. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    your welcome. good luck! :)
    10gal Betta Tank - Skye the crowntail and Squiggles the deformed albino cory
    10gal Tank- Glofish
    75gal- Everything

  7. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    How do you determine the sex of the cory's?

  8. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    with albinos it is really hard. when full grown its easier, because the females are much larger than the males. Otherwise, the males ventral fins are more pointed, whereas the females are more paddle-shaped and rounded and bigger. Their ventral fins are hard to see though, because they have to be up off gravel to see them, and then they are usually moving fast.
    10gal Betta Tank - Skye the crowntail and Squiggles the deformed albino cory
    10gal Tank- Glofish
    75gal- Everything

  9. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    How big are the adults?

  10. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    The Albino Cory Catfish or any Cory for that matter is not one fish that appears to be commonly bred by most aquarists. I have mentioned to several pet stores that I have successfully bred these species, few actually believed me!

    I have kept Albino Cory Cats on 2 seperate occasions, and both times they bred quite readily. I have found them to be a relatively easy species to breed, and they will actually spawn in the community tank.

    I will tell you about the most recent breedings, and some things I have learned while breeding these fish. Lets talk a little about the fish themselves. The Albino Cory Catfish (Corydoras aeneus) is a rather hearty species, and are easy to keep. Many owners keep them to take care of uneaten food from the bottom of the aquarium. They are a small fish, typically about 2 to 2 1/2 inches in length. They are bottom feeders, and they have short whiskers that help them locate food. They will adapt to a varied water chemistry and temperature.

    These fish can be sexed easily. The females are larger then the males and are a bit "wider".

    If the fish are well fed, they will breed right in your community tank. When they breed, they will deposit eggs right on the aquarium walls. Time of day doesnt seem to matter with these guys, although normally they are somewhat nocturnal, but not totally. It almost seems these fish never sleep. They will breed either during daylight or at night.

    Eggs that are laid in a community tank will almost certainly be eaten, and if they arent, the newly hatched fry will be. Therefore if your Cory's are laying eggs, it would be a good time to move them to a breeding tank soon after they are finished. Some aquarists have been able to move the eggs from the community tank over to a breeding tank by peeling them off the glass with a straight edge razor blade. I personally have not been successful in doing this, but its worth a try to try to save some eggs from this breeding. A better approach if you wish to intentionally breed these fish is to move the fish to a breeding tank set up specifically for the purpose. They will breed again in about 2 weeks after the first breeding.
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