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Results 11 to 14 of 14
  1. #11

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Natural sea water levels of minerals, including Calcium, are rock solid stable. Thus the animals and inverts in our marine or marine reef tanks are accustomed to those levels. When too little or too much of those minerals or too much or little of trace elements can seriously stunt the growth of corals, stress the fishes, and in extreme causes kill life.

    That customer of yours who claims to have kept a reef for years is either lying or has been stumbling along for those years, replacing the creatures he's killed in his ignorance.

    Dave
    When a finger points to the moon, the imbecile looks at the finger.

    Omnia mutantur nihil interit.

    The more you read, the more things you will know. The more that you learn, the more places you'll go

  2. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave66
    Natural sea water levels of minerals, including Calcium, are rock solid stable. Thus the animals and inverts in our marine or marine reef tanks are accustomed to those levels. When too little or too much of those minerals or too much or little of trace elements can seriously stunt the growth of corals, stress the fishes, and in extreme causes kill life.

    That customer of yours who claims to have kept a reef for years is either lying or has been stumbling along for those years, replacing the creatures he's killed in his ignorance.

    Dave
    That makes perfect sense :) Your suggestions earlier were great as well, I had actually suggested to the customer that his RO unit wasn't working properly, he quickly dismissed it. He pretty much dismissed everything I said but I do hope he comes back like he says, see if I can get through to him although I'm certainly not holding my breath.

    I'm amazed the store tank thrives the way it does without testing those elements.
    3 Gallon Planted Betta Tank
    4 gallon planted Aqueon Evolve Dwarf Puffer Tank

  3. #13

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I command you for trying to learn about saltwater so you can help your customers. More than most employees do. But this is what we often talk about here (a lot) and you drive the point home. Here's a guy who has a problem with his tank and an employee who is trying to help but in the dark himself. And the guy ends up blaming the "guy at the fish store" rather than taking the time to join a forum and talking to those who keep these tanks themselves.

    With only one saltwater in the store, you can believe the manager isn't going to offer up any training when he doesn't even do the tests. How about mentioning the forum to this guy and urge him to start researching and talking to the experts who have saltwater? You can both learn much from others here.

    If someone asked me a question about saltwater, I'd run out for my lunch break! I know "nothing". But we have some great saltwater keepers here that could help him out a bunch and you'd be learning, too?

    Meanwhile, I tip my hat to you and your efforts to help this customer.

  4. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by Lady Hobbs
    I command you for trying to learn about saltwater so you can help your customers. More than most employees do. But this is what we often talk about here (a lot) and you drive the point home. Here's a guy who has a problem with his tank and an employee who is trying to help but in the dark himself. And the guy ends up blaming the "guy at the fish store" rather than taking the time to join a forum and talking to those who keep these tanks themselves.

    With only one saltwater in the store, you can believe the manager isn't going to offer up any training when he doesn't even do the tests. How about mentioning the forum to this guy and urge him to start researching and talking to the experts who have saltwater? You can both learn much from others here.

    If someone asked me a question about saltwater, I'd run out for my lunch break! I know "nothing". But we have some great saltwater keepers here that could help him out a bunch and you'd be learning, too?

    Meanwhile, I tip my hat to you and your efforts to help this customer.
    Thank you Lady Hobbs! And that's a great idea, I will mention the forum. I have given out the site address to quite a few of my freshwater customers.

    We had one salt water training seminar at work and that's where I learned about proper lighting(which I finally think I understand), starting the tank, heating, and filtration. But unfortunately with salt water, you can not learn everything in an hours worth of training. Simply not enough time,and of course there is always more to learn.

    I take care of the salt tank at work and that's certainly easy enough, test the levels daily, add r/o, do water changes, feed the fish...but that's the simple stuff.

    I have to say for a pet store, we lose very little fish. Maybe five a day at most. We usually lose the most the day after a fish shipment. But unfortunately we are still just a pet store, and some of the old timers who work there have extremely antiquated ideas on fish keeping and refuse to learn anything new. One of the women who has been there for years is constantly telling people that however many fish they have is fine when often it's not. (e.g. other day woman had three cories, a tricolor shark, a bunch of neon tetras, and something else in a 20 gallon tank and she wanted to add an Angel Fish, of course my co worker says yes.)

    So I guess the point of my rambling is, no matter how knowledgeable a person at the pet store is, and some of us do know our stuff or will do our best to find out the right information for you, you should always research for yourself because you simply never know how experienced that person really is.
    3 Gallon Planted Betta Tank
    4 gallon planted Aqueon Evolve Dwarf Puffer Tank

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