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Results 1 to 10 of 12
  1. #1

    Default Do not Support Dyed Corals


    0 Not allowed!
    When I researched the below, I got a lot of information you are about to read from a few articles written by Anthony Calfo.

    From time to time you will find certain corals and anemones that have been dyed to make them more colorful. Wholesalers have been known to do this to make their products more appealing to the end purchaser, and so that can market them as “rare” to further mark-up the price and their profit.

    In most cases, once a anemone or coral has been dyed, its chances for survival are not good at all. This is why I would suggest not supporting the practice by not purchasing a dyed coral or anemone. If we eliminate the demand, we can eliminate the practice. Dyed corals may be easy for an experienced hobbyist to identify, but not so easy for someone newer to keeping corals.

    Some of the most commonly dyed corals include, but are not limited to: “Leather/Finger” coral (Sinularia), “Colt” coral (Klyxum), “Cup” coral (Turbinaria peltata), “Flowerpot” coral (Goniopora), and “Trumpet” coral (Caulastrea), as well as sebae and “carpet” anemones.

    Identifying a Dyed Coral or Anemone

    Below are some ways that may help you identify a dyed coral or anemone:
    A) Rare or unnatural coloring, like a very bright yellow, hot pink, and neon like bright green seem to be more common colors of dyes that have been used.
    B) Very uniform coloring all over the coral.
    C) A very odd discoloration in your tank (as the dye leaches out of the coral) after a day or two
    D) Reduced extension of polyps after a few days or a week
    E) Decreasing coloration as the dye fads. The coral becomes “bleached” after a few weeks
    F) If there is a part of the skeleton that is exposed, and, it is the same color as the coral
    G) In anemones, there will be no under tone of brown in the coloring of the animal
    H) Also, the anemones foot will be a vastly different color than the tentacles (a obviously contrasting color)
    I) A very brightly colored yellow sebae anemone, as there is no recorded cases of such coloring in one being found in the ocean (at least to the best of my knowledge)
    J) Any yellow anemone should be suspected to be dyed as this is a extremely rare color for any type of anemone

    The above are just “rules of thumb” and will not guarantee you will be able to identify a dyed anemone or coral. The best way tell is a coral has been dyed is through research before buying. As you really should research the coral’s requirements ( like light, flow, and water conditions ) so you know how to care for your coral, take the extra time to look at a few pictures of the coral so you will know what they look like in nature. If the one you are about to buy doesn’t look close to those pics, you should pass on it.

    Caring for Dyed Coral
    If you come into possession of a dyed coral or anemone, you are going to have to give it some special care and attention if it is going to have a chance to survive.

    As you may or may not know, corals and anemones contain zooxanthellae algae inside their bodies. This symbiotic relationship is what allows the corals and anemones to thrive. While inside the body of the coral, the zooxanthellae algae will use photosynthesis utilizing the light to produce food and carbon for the coral or anemone to consume becoming it’s mane food source. The dies will reduce the usable light getting through the coral’s outer skin to the zooxanthellae algae and causing the coral or anemone to slowly starve to death. In addition, once this starts the coral will become very stressed. As a natural response to this extreme stress, the coral will start to expel its internal fluids which will release the die and the zooxanthellae algae. In addition, their metabolism will slow and their immune system will become weakened leaving them at risk of severe necrotic infections as their condition worsens.

    There are three actions you can take to help a dyed coral or anemone survive this.
    1) Regular feedings. Before the stress starts to set in, the coral or anemone should willingly accept food. This can help to off-set the reduced internal photosynthesis. This is the single most important thing that you can do for a dyed coral. Dyed corals are starving animals
    2) Treat your coral or anemone as if it is suffering from extreme bleaching. Place it in an area of reduced lighting as it will become very sensitive to higher lighting levels. Don’t place them in darkness, just an area of the tank were the lighting is somewhat lower (low to moderate lighting levels).
    3) Run good quality carbon in your system and ensure you keep up on your waterchanges to help remove any dyes that may be released into the water as well as any toxins that might be released by the stress coral.


    Below are some examples:

    Dyed colt coral. Pic from Reefkeeping magazine



    Normal colt coral. Pic from LiveAquaria.com



    Dyed finger leather corals. Pic taken from ReefKeeping Magazine


    Normal leather coral. Pic taken from Liveaquaria.com
    Last edited by Cliff; 01-27-2012 at 09:58 PM.
    If you take your time to do the research FIRST, you can successfully set-up and keep ANY type of aquarium with ease.
    "Not using a quarantine tank is like playing Russian roulette. Nobody wins the game, some people just get to play longer than others." - Anthony Calfo
    Fishless Cycle Cycling with Fish Marine Aquarium Info [URL="http://saltwater.aquaticcommunity.com/"]

  2. #2

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Dyed tube coral. Pic taken from wetwebmedia.com


    Normal tube coral. Pic taken from Liveaquaria.com


    Dyed Blue Cespitularia. Pic taken from wetwebmedia.com


    Normal Blue Cespitularia. Pic taken from liveaquaria.com
    If you take your time to do the research FIRST, you can successfully set-up and keep ANY type of aquarium with ease.
    "Not using a quarantine tank is like playing Russian roulette. Nobody wins the game, some people just get to play longer than others." - Anthony Calfo
    Fishless Cycle Cycling with Fish Marine Aquarium Info [URL="http://saltwater.aquaticcommunity.com/"]

  3. #3

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Dyed Sebea Anemone. Pic Taken from wetwebmedia.com


    Nromal Sebea Anemone, the below pic is my anemone in my 120 gallon reef



    Here’s list of some of the known corals that have been dyed that I was able to find:
    Finger leather coral (Sinularia flexibis)
    Colt coral (Klyxum)
    Cup coral (Turbinaria peltata)
    Flowerpot coral (Goniopora)
    Trumpet” coral (Caulastrea)
    Tube coral (Tubastrea aurea)
    Blue Cespitularia (Cespitularia)


    Anemones that have been known to be dyed:
    Handonni Carpet anemone (Stichodactyla haddoni)
    Gigantea Carept anemone (Stichodactyla gigantea)

    Sebae anemones (Heteractis crispa)


    Let’s keep building on this list
    If you take your time to do the research FIRST, you can successfully set-up and keep ANY type of aquarium with ease.
    "Not using a quarantine tank is like playing Russian roulette. Nobody wins the game, some people just get to play longer than others." - Anthony Calfo
    Fishless Cycle Cycling with Fish Marine Aquarium Info [URL="http://saltwater.aquaticcommunity.com/"]

  4. #4

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Good post!!
    Do as I say. Not as I do.

  5. #5

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Great post, i didnt even know the dyed coral

    29 gallon-planted community

    20 long frag tank
    75 gal-planted goldfish

    75 gallon mixed reef with 20 gallon sump






  6. #6

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I have only personally seen one dyed coral at a SW LFS, a finger leather dyed a very bright pink

    The owener tried to QT it and save it, but it only lasted a few days.

    He later switched suppliers in hopes of this never happening again.
    Last edited by Cliff; 01-28-2012 at 09:39 PM.
    If you take your time to do the research FIRST, you can successfully set-up and keep ANY type of aquarium with ease.
    "Not using a quarantine tank is like playing Russian roulette. Nobody wins the game, some people just get to play longer than others." - Anthony Calfo
    Fishless Cycle Cycling with Fish Marine Aquarium Info [URL="http://saltwater.aquaticcommunity.com/"]

  7. #7

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Excellent post and stickied.

  8. #8

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    That's horrible Cliiff; first dyed freshwater fishes, now corals? Would like to know where that practice started, but I already have a strong suspicion.

    Very good post Cliff. It'll make people aware of dyed corals, and avoid purchasing them.

    Dave
    When a finger points to the moon, the imbecile looks at the finger.

    Omnia mutantur nihil interit.

    The more you read, the more things you will know. The more that you learn, the more places you'll go

  9. #9

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    From what I have read, it started in 2001 / 2002. There was a few smaller wholesalers based in Indonesia that were doing that. Since then, there have been a few others poping up here and there, mostly the smaller wholesalers that collect the corals.

    Thank goodness for the various certifactions (like M,A.C. which is the Marine Advisory Commission) that have been poping up for North American wholersalers and the growing trend for aqua-cultured animals
    Last edited by Cliff; 01-28-2012 at 09:20 PM.
    If you take your time to do the research FIRST, you can successfully set-up and keep ANY type of aquarium with ease.
    "Not using a quarantine tank is like playing Russian roulette. Nobody wins the game, some people just get to play longer than others." - Anthony Calfo
    Fishless Cycle Cycling with Fish Marine Aquarium Info [URL="http://saltwater.aquaticcommunity.com/"]

  10. #10

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Figured it'd be coming out of there, but I'd bet the practice started in Singapore.

    Dave
    When a finger points to the moon, the imbecile looks at the finger.

    Omnia mutantur nihil interit.

    The more you read, the more things you will know. The more that you learn, the more places you'll go

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