Aquarium Forum
 


Menu
  · Tropical Fish Home
· Fish News
· Aquarium Forum
· Buy & Sell
· Calculators
· Equipment reviews
· Free Aquarium Ebook
· Feedback
· Link to us
· Photo gallery
· Plant species
· Tropica Plant DB
Tropical fish species
· By Common name
· By Scientific name
Tropical Marine fish
· By Common name
· By Scientific name

_________________
 
      
        Via paypal

  AC news is a part of
      Nature Blog Network

      Reef Aquarium Blog

Privacy & Ad Policy

Articles
  · African Cichlids
· Algae Control
· Aquarium Decoration
· Aquarium Resources
· Aquatic Plants
· Barb Fish
· Betta Fish
· Breeding Fish
· Catfish
· Central American Cichlids
· Cichlids
· Clownfish
· Corals
· Corydoras Catfish
· Discus Fish
· Dwarf Cichlids
· Fish Diseases
· Frogs and Turtles
· Goby Fish
· Goldfish
· Gourami
· Invertebrates
· Jellyfish
· Killiefish
· Lake Victoria Cichlids
· Livebearers
· Malawi Cichlids
· Marine Aquariums
· Marine Aquarium Fish
· Other Fish
· Pleco
· Predatory Fish
· Photography
· Pond Fish
· Responsible Fish Keeping
· Rainbow Fish
· Shark Fish
· South American Cichlids
· Tanganyika Cichlids
· Tetra Fish
· Tropical Fish Food
Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1

    Default A long question about pods


    0 Not allowed!
    From the day I saw the first amphipod in my tank, I致e been fascinated by these little creatures. Lately (for a number of different reasons) I have been doing a lot of research on some of the different types of pods. There literally thousands and thousands of different species of pods. So I知 trying to look at it in general terms. I知 not even too sure that I知 understanding these guys correctly, but below is what I think that I have learn in the past few weeks.
    Have I missed anything, am I understanding these little guys OK ?. Are there any good references that anyone here has found about these guys.

    AMPHIPODS





    There are over 7,000 species of Amphipods, some of which look like something you would expect to see in a science fiction horror movie. Some of the less common types (more rare to find) are more like parasites that can feed on your fish or feed off of other living things in the tank. They are found both in marine and fresh water environments
    Although large ones may be several centimeters long (1 to 2 and some even bigger), most of the ones that make their way into our tanks are one centimeter (approx ス to 5/8) in length or less. The more common types have a long tubular body terminating in a small and bulb shaped head that sprouts two pair of long antennae, which may be as long as the rest of the body.
    Amphipods will usually end up as fish food, becoming someone痴 snack long before you will become aware they are in your tank.
    Amphipods are often scavengers feeding on phytoplankton and everything they can find on the bottom of the tank including: detritus, uneaten food, some types of bacteria, and occasionally algae. Others types of amphipods are herbivorous and filter feed by extending their antennae into the water current as a net. The herbivores are easier to spot as they will spend some time sitting on a rock or a piece of algae, which they grip with their hind legs. The body extends vertically up into the water and the front legs and antenna are spread out wide as they wait for something to pass by them in the water. They will reach out and grab food drifting by.
    Daily consumption in some species may be as great as 100% of the body weight for juveniles and 60% for adults!

    COPEPODS




    As will all types of pods, there are many different types of copepods. Copepods are small crustaceans, in both the ocean and our aquariums. Copepods are very common and important little critters to have in your tank. They can range in size, but the more common types are very small to microscopic in size. In a large tank, they will likely number in the millions. They will become an important source of food in your tank for both fish and some corals. Some of the less common copepods are parasitic living off of our fish and other living things in the tank. Often when both types are in our tanks we will not realize it.
    They eat phytoplankton and are scavengers feeding of what they can find on the bottom of the tank which includes: detritus, uneaten food, some types of bacteria. They may also feed on algae, including coralline algae.
    Live copepods are a very important food source when keep more difficult species of fish such as the mandarin dragonet, or to breed other marine species in captivity.
    If you take your time to do the research FIRST, you can successfully set-up and keep ANY type of aquarium with ease.
    "Not using a quarantine tank is like playing Russian roulette. Nobody wins the game, some people just get to play longer than others." - Anthony Calfo
    Fishless Cycle Cycling with Fish Marine Aquarium Info [URL="http://saltwater.aquaticcommunity.com/"]

  2. #2

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Isopods



    There are around 5000 different types of Isopods, most of them are marine species but there are some that are found in fresh water. As will all pods, they range in size from microscopic to very large. Most Isopods are parasitic creatures. An easy way to identify the more common types of Isopods is by the larger black eyes in comparison to the rest of their body size and as compared to other types of pods. The more common ones are nasty little things and require extreme measures to remove them from your tank.
    They will eat phytoplankton and are also scavengers feeding of what they can find on the bottom of the tank ranging from: detritus, uneaten food, some types of bacteria. They will also feed on different types of algae including coralline algae. The more common types of isopods are parasitic and will feed of your fish. These types of isopods will fasten onto a fish and eat its way into a major blood vessel where it will remain for some time sucking blood and eating tissue. When it has had its fill, it will leave its host and swim away. If the Isopod stays on the fish, the fish needs to be captured, removed to QT and have to Isopod removed, potentially followed by treatments.
    These pods are extremely difficult to catch and manually remove from your tank. If you get Isopods in your tank you have two options: 1) Remove all the fish from the tank and wait two to three months until all the isopods have died from starvation, or 2) replace all live rock and substrate discarding the old rock and substrate as the isopods will be hiding in it.
    If you do nothing, the most likely outcome would be the isopods killing all of your fish one by one. These isopods are masterfully designed predators and should not be underestimated.



    If you take your time to do the research FIRST, you can successfully set-up and keep ANY type of aquarium with ease.
    "Not using a quarantine tank is like playing Russian roulette. Nobody wins the game, some people just get to play longer than others." - Anthony Calfo
    Fishless Cycle Cycling with Fish Marine Aquarium Info [URL="http://saltwater.aquaticcommunity.com/"]

  3. #3

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Very good post Cliff, quite informative. Your IDs were right on. The only published work I know of appeared in past issues of the scientific journal Zootaxia.

    Dave
    When a finger points to the moon, the imbecile looks at the finger.

    Omnia mutantur nihil interit.

    The more you read, the more things you will know. The more that you learn, the more places you'll go

  4. #4

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Thanks Dave

    I'm going to look up the reference you provided. I want to learn more about this little guys.

    If you take your time to do the research FIRST, you can successfully set-up and keep ANY type of aquarium with ease.
    "Not using a quarantine tank is like playing Russian roulette. Nobody wins the game, some people just get to play longer than others." - Anthony Calfo
    Fishless Cycle Cycling with Fish Marine Aquarium Info [URL="http://saltwater.aquaticcommunity.com/"]

  5. #5

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    yea man these things are whacky... i had a ton of iso's but now they're gone... i think the angel fish did a number on them... however i have the other two types now... very fascinating to watch with a flashlight since i've noticed they're really not out much during the day haha
    55g Long --> After 18mo of doing well the tank crashed during moving. Most likely cause: Flatworm Die-off... won't start another until after moving... Likely not until late 2013

    20g Long --> currently concoting a build plan

    Check out the journal to follow my 20g SW tank

    "Take a chance, because you never know how perfect some things can turn out" -- unknown

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •