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Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 25 of 25
  1. #21

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    For not running any CO2, having lots of nutrients, and not having much in the line of floating plants, that's quite a bit of light. Personally I'd start running CO2 or add some floaters.
    Considering a Marine Aquarium? A Breakdown of the Components, Live Rock, Cycling a Marine Tank

    "The capacity to learn is a gift; The ability to learn is a skill; The WILLINGNESS to learn is a choice." - Unknown

  2. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I can does with excel. I am not currently able to put together CO2 - midterms and all. I'll think about it for next week (reading week). Why more floating plants? Lower Carbon requirement?

    Also, why would you change something? I'm not questioning, but curious as to what may happen if I leave things as are.

    Thanks for your help, too!

  3. #23

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Floating plants do not draw their CO2 from the water, they draw it directly from the atmosphere. The concentration of CO2 is is much higher in the atmosphere than it is in water. Since floating plants have that access to CO2, they draw the nutrients out of the water column faster and thus give the algae nothing to feed on. With a dirt first layer, all your nutrients are in the substrate and the plants will draw them from there.

    The change is due to an imbalance. The growth of the algae is proof of that imbalance. You need something to remove the "food source" for the algae.
    Considering a Marine Aquarium? A Breakdown of the Components, Live Rock, Cycling a Marine Tank

    "The capacity to learn is a gift; The ability to learn is a skill; The WILLINGNESS to learn is a choice." - Unknown

  4. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Fantastic! thank you for your help. So far, the otos are looooving it up and down. I've already seen it cleared from one area, to grow back, and it be eaten again! I will set my timer to come on for an hour less a day, and see if the otos can almost clear it.

    I love having danios! They're so funny, and sometimes my otos think they're danios and dart around with them.

    Have only been able to track one of three shrimps down - not too worried though.

    Going to think about putting in a DIY CO2.

  5. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Everyone's happy and healthy. I've seen a couple of all-eyes-and-belly platy fry, but I think for the most part that they are being eaten, which is ok by me. The plants have taken off like mad. I now truly love my tank. Here are today's (crappy cellphone) pictures!
    Attached Images Attached Images

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