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Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Nano reef tank?

  1. #1

    Default Nano reef tank?


    0 Not allowed!
    I really want to set up a reef tank, but I have limited space. If I leave out any species of fish but keep polyps, corals, etc. + invertibrates, how small of a tank do you think I could keep while still being able to maintain a healthy set up. If I wanted to have fish I assume it would have to be bigger. How much bigger?

    I have not yet decided on any species to put in yet, so if you could add some suggestions for a smaller tank that would help greatly.

    Thank you

  2. #2

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    IMO, it would also depend upon your experiance level with salt water.

    based on my experiances, I would suggest a 40 gallon or larger tank for your first SW set-up. If you are experianced, then I would suggest the 29 gallon nano tank.

    The 40 gallon certainly gives you a few more options for reef safe fish, like a flame back or dwarf flame angels and maybe a pair of clowns, but a 29 gallon gives you much less options
    If you take your time to do the research FIRST, you can successfully set-up and keep ANY type of aquarium with ease.
    "Not using a quarantine tank is like playing Russian roulette. Nobody wins the game, some people just get to play longer than others." - Anthony Calfo
    Fishless Cycle Cycling with Fish Marine Aquarium Info [URL="http://saltwater.aquaticcommunity.com/"]

  3. #3

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I guess keeping a reef would be more difficult than just keeping tropical fish then?

    I read that keeping a larger tank is easier than a smaller tank. Why is that?

    29g is really nano size? That is bigger than what I have now. My largest is a 10g. Would it actually be possible to keep a reef in a 10g (assuming the person was experienced), or is that too small?
    (I am not saying I will. I just wanted to know)

  4. #4

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    It's only based on the learning involved when you first start out in SW. There is a TON of info to learn. But once you have worked through that, SW is not really all that harder than FW, IMO.

    There are more parameters to keep a eye in SW and if you have more water (a larger tank) then you will have more stable water parameters. Larger systems are more forgiving if you make a mistake. That is what makes larger tanks more forgiving than smaller ones

    Sorry for the poor typing here, I lost my internet connection and I'm posting from my phone
    If you take your time to do the research FIRST, you can successfully set-up and keep ANY type of aquarium with ease.
    "Not using a quarantine tank is like playing Russian roulette. Nobody wins the game, some people just get to play longer than others." - Anthony Calfo
    Fishless Cycle Cycling with Fish Marine Aquarium Info [URL="http://saltwater.aquaticcommunity.com/"]

  5. #5

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by Tango
    I guess keeping a reef would be more difficult than just keeping tropical fish then?

    I read that keeping a larger tank is easier than a smaller tank. Why is that?

    29g is really nano size? That is bigger than what I have now. My largest is a 10g. Would it actually be possible to keep a reef in a 10g (assuming the person was experienced), or is that too small?
    (I am not saying I will. I just wanted to know)
    Not really more difficult IMO, just less forgiving, and has a larger learning curve. It's like anything, the more knowledge you arm yourself with, the better off you are going to be.

    Cliff hit it right on with the tank size. Smaller tanks are less forgiving and are less stable. Getting the parameters off by the least little bit will have a larger effect in a small tank than they will in a large tank. For example, in my 75gal tank, if I lose 1gal of water to evaporation, I will probably not even notice the difference in my specific gravity, however if I lose 1gal to evaporation in my 37gal, I will notice an increase of probably .001-.002. That doesn't sound like much, but it really more of a change than it looks like.

    As to the question of the 10gal tank, yes it is possible for someone with some experience. I've personally kept a reef tank that was only 2.5gal but it is definitely not something for the beginner.
    Considering a Marine Aquarium? A Breakdown of the Components, Live Rock, Cycling a Marine Tank

    "The capacity to learn is a gift; The ability to learn is a skill; The WILLINGNESS to learn is a choice." - Unknown

  6. #6

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by Tango
    Would it actually be possible to keep a reef in a 10g (assuming the person was experienced), or is that too small?
    (I am not saying I will. I just wanted to know)

    I'm running a 10 gallon and a 75. Both are fairly easy to maintain now that they've been running a while and I have experience, but with the 75 I can skip a water change or 2 (not that I do) and not worry about any problems but with the 10 gallon I wouldn't dare skipping a water change, or even delaying it a few days. So like ILMGB said, bigger tanks are much more forgiving then smaller ones

    29 gallon-planted community

    20 long frag tank
    75 gal-planted goldfish

    75 gallon mixed reef with 20 gallon sump






  7. #7

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by labnjab
    I'm running a 10 gallon and a 75. Both are fairly easy to maintain now that they've been running a while and I have experience, but with the 75 I can skip a water change or 2 (not that I do) and not worry about any problems but with the 10 gallon I wouldn't dare skipping a water change, or even delaying it a few days. So like ILMGB said, bigger tanks are much more forgiving then smaller ones
    That is the same as with freshwater tanks though, isn't it? I have to change my smaller tanks more regularly than my larger one.



    Since I would need more experience before setting up a nano reef then, should I refrain from doing so? I am not allowed to keep anything larger than a 10g tank and frankly, I have no room for anything larger.

    I had another question as well. Is keeping a slatwater tank with ONLY fish simpler than keeping a reef?

  8. #8

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Actually if you invested the necessary time and effort to research and learn about nanos PRIOR to setting one up...it could be very successful. The corals you have mentioned are easy to keep and are actually hardier than many fish. Here is a run down on what I would do if you wanted a reef, and wanted to invest the time and effort into a 10G.

    10G tank
    65watt PC light(cheap and easy, the corals you mentioned will do fine under it)
    5lbs dry aragonite sand, 5lbs of live sand(most LFS sell live)
    10-15lbs live rock
    Koralia nano circulation pump
    AquaClear 70 HOB
    50watt heater
    Salt
    Hydrometer

    A very simple setup, in the AC 70 add a bag of Chemi-Pure Elite, 100ml Purigen and cut up a PolyFilter so you can squeeze it into the chamber. All of this chemical media will help control phosphate and nitrate in the tank plus it will polish the water to a nice clarity. I would place the Koralia opposite the AC70 to eliminate dead spots...the live rock is your primary source of filtration in any marine tank.

    The 65watt PC will provide ample lighting for the corals, it is also a cheap easy fixture to find. A 50/50 bulb will work fine...they are also easy to find. You will need to keep the bulb suspended a few inches above the tank(mounting legs work fine) as it will help keep heat down.

    I would keep the tank open top as well to help heat escape the tank, with that said I would also keep the SG a little lower than most reef systems to keep daily evaporation from running the SG too high. I would keep it around 1.023 instead of most reefs 1.025...for the corals kept it will be fine. I would however invest in a quality reef salt such as Seachem as it provides a good level of calcium and alkalinity without buffering, I have also had no algae issues using it.

    You notice the tank is skimmerless, a skimmer is not a must for a tank this size with polyps which actually do well without one. I would do 30% weekly WCs combined with daily top offs.

    For setting up a small reef the slower you go the better, I would set the tank up with sand, water and equipment and just let it run for around a month. During this time you can see how often you will need to do top offs based on evaporation and how evaporated water will effect you SG level before adding livestock. I would then add the live rock and wait about 2 weeks, then add your CUC. For the CUC I would do no more than 2-3 astrae snails, 2 Nassarius snails and 2-3 hermits. You will need to feed them a couple times per week, attaching a small piece of Nori to a rock in the tank works best. They will also appreciate some small sinking marine pellets as well. Feed VERY sparingly.

    You can actually have a fish in this tank, I would however keep no more than 1 tiny fish. I would limit the choices to something small bodied like a single Firefish, Clown Goby, etc. I would wait till the tank hand been running successfully with the CUC for around 4-6 weeks before adding the fish. After you added the fish I would give the tank 2 more months of careful maintenance and attention before adding your coral. By this time the tank will be fairly well established and you will have a good hand on balancing it.

    Nanos are not forgiving and a larger tank is easier to run, my 55G reef which is essentially just a larger scale model of the setup mentioned is the easiest tank I have in terms of upkeep. But if you have the desire and dedication, a nano is not hard to keep. Patience is probably the biggest ticket.
    20G High-Tech Planted|50G High-Tech Planted|50G Goldfish Tank|56G Column Low-Tech Planted

    4x75Gs coming soon

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