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Results 11 to 20 of 27
  1. #11

    Join Date
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    0 Not allowed!
    This will come in handy when we eventually (much much longer term) look at a SW tank.

    One item I didn't see mentioned, but have heard can be useful is the hydrometer to test the relative salinity. If that is truly important perhaps we can add that to this thread?

  2. #12

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    0 Not allowed!
    Good point Trillianne

    I tried a few different hydrometers when I first started in salt water not too long ago. In my experience, they did not work very well. The test results were not very accurate and always seemed to be +/- 0.004 from the SW LFS test results were. I got the same variation in result with two different brands. I may not have been using them correctly tho as I was still learning about SW set-ups at the same time.

    I then started to use a refactometer and got consistence results over time and as compared to the SW LFS. IMO, its well worth the extra cost to get a refactometer instead of a hydrometer. Below is a example of one brand of refactormeter

    http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/revi...uct=407&cat=32
    If you take your time to do the research FIRST, you can successfully set-up and keep ANY type of aquarium with ease.
    "Not using a quarantine tank is like playing Russian roulette. Nobody wins the game, some people just get to play longer than others." - Anthony Calfo
    Fishless Cycle Cycling with Fish Marine Aquarium Info [URL="http://saltwater.aquaticcommunity.com/"]

  3. #13

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    0 Not allowed!
    The addition of hydrometers and refractometers can definitely added. I'll get that together and have Cliff add it to the original posts. It might surprise many to learn that hydrometers are not all inaccurate... (teaser lol)
    Considering a Marine Aquarium? A Breakdown of the Components, Live Rock, Cycling a Marine Tank

    "The capacity to learn is a gift; The ability to learn is a skill; The WILLINGNESS to learn is a choice." - Unknown

  4. #14

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    0 Not allowed!
    Goldbarb, I up-dated the orginal post

    Great info on the swing arm style hydrometers. That was the style that I had tried but did not like. Good to know the other / floating style can be as accurate as a refactormeter.
    If you take your time to do the research FIRST, you can successfully set-up and keep ANY type of aquarium with ease.
    "Not using a quarantine tank is like playing Russian roulette. Nobody wins the game, some people just get to play longer than others." - Anthony Calfo
    Fishless Cycle Cycling with Fish Marine Aquarium Info [URL="http://saltwater.aquaticcommunity.com/"]

  5. #15

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Cliff, the floating style of hydrometer can actually be more accurate than a refractometer if it is calibrated right, simply because it will never lose it's calibration.
    Considering a Marine Aquarium? A Breakdown of the Components, Live Rock, Cycling a Marine Tank

    "The capacity to learn is a gift; The ability to learn is a skill; The WILLINGNESS to learn is a choice." - Unknown

  6. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I'm thinking seriously about starting a saltwater tank. I'm also a homebrewer. Will my homebrewing hydrometer work for measuring saltwater salinity? Also, if I do get a refractometer will I be able to use it in both hobbies?

  7. #17

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    It all depends on the what measurements your hydrometer has on it. However, I personally wouldn't use it. A refractometer is no big deal, you certainly could use that in both hobbies.

    The big reason I wouldn't use the hydrometer is you really don't want to run the risk of cross-contamination. The refractometer simply uses a small sample of the liquid whereas your hydrometer is placed directly into it. The sample is discarded and thus you run no risk of contaminating either your tank or your brew.
    Considering a Marine Aquarium? A Breakdown of the Components, Live Rock, Cycling a Marine Tank

    "The capacity to learn is a gift; The ability to learn is a skill; The WILLINGNESS to learn is a choice." - Unknown

  8. Default Very helpful post!


    0 Not allowed!
    I'm just getting started with a SW aquarium, and this post has been amazingly helpful.

    Another piece of equipment I was curious about is water pumps. Not for creating the water movement within the tank, but for getting the water from the sump back up to the main tank. I was wondering what type/strength/power of water pumps people generally use. Does anyone have any good or bad experiences with particular types or brands they can share before I put one on my shopping list?

    Edit: When talking about the flow within the tank created by the power head, it is recommended that you have a 10X per hour turnover. Does that include the volume of the sump. In other words, if my main tank is 55 gallons, and my sump is 40 gallons, should I be looking for a 550 GPH, or 950 GPH flow? OR, should I have a 550 GPH flow in my main tank, and a 400 GPH flow in my sump?

    Basically, I'm trying to figure out what kind of power I need to move water from the sump to my tank, how much flow I should have in my tanks, and what percentage of that flow will be caused simply by the pumping of water between tanks (or if I should just ignore that component completely and assume 100% of the movement comes from the powerhead flow).

    Lol. I hope those questions make sense.

    Thanks!
    Last edited by Janelle; 07-04-2011 at 03:25 PM.

  9. #19

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    0 Not allowed!
    Generally people aim for a minimum of 10x turnover of the entire system volume, this includes the volume of the sump. The return pump is included in that volume turn over. It must be noted that this is just a general idea, and the flow rate for each system will be different. It will all depend on the needs of the tank. For your FOWLR tank, a 10x turnover would likely be fine, but you still may want to get more. As for a return pump from the sump, the strength you get is going to be completely dependent on the flow rate of your overflow. You need to get a pump that will not exceed the overflow rate. For example, a 1" PVC pipe has a flow rate of 600gph using gravity, thus your return pump cannot exceed that flow rate at the given head height (distance from the pump to the top of the tank.) There is also a slight difference between submersible and in-line pumps. Submersible pumps tend to add more heat to the water. Unless you have a sump with a drilled end, you will probably end up using a submersible pump.

    If you by chance happen to get a pump that does exceed your overflow flow rate, you can use a bypass system to avoid overflowing your tank and emptying your sump. Basically, with a bypass, some of the water is diverted back to the sump rather than back to the tank.
    Last edited by ILuvMyGoldBarb; 07-04-2011 at 04:08 PM.
    Considering a Marine Aquarium? A Breakdown of the Components, Live Rock, Cycling a Marine Tank

    "The capacity to learn is a gift; The ability to learn is a skill; The WILLINGNESS to learn is a choice." - Unknown

  10. Thumbs up


    0 Not allowed!
    Thanks for the post. As someone who is just started out this is a wealth of information. Much appreciated!

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