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Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 19 of 19

Thread: Losing my neons

  1. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by Lady Hobbs
    Tetra's are claimed to do better with temps around 74-76 but mine have been in warmer tanks, as well.
    I agree, I use to run mine in 78-79F with no problem.

    james

  2. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by jttt3
    I agree, I use to run mine in 78-79F with no problem.

    james
    Hmm. I'm not sure what could be my issue then. I'm fairly certain my tank has cycled. I have had a spike in the nitrates and other than the tetras, I only lost 2 danios a month a part from each other, but there are still 5 other fish doing quite well in the tank. I do register some ammonia when I test it, but it is somewhere between 0ppm and .25ppm.

  3. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I've wondered about this. All the grief I've had with my neons was when the tank was 80-82. I couldn't get it any lower, with my lowest setting.

    The second attempt of my tank I got the smallest heater I can find. It's actually rated for a 3-5g tank. It's also on the lowest setting. I got it down to 78 and this batch of neons has been much much better, although still some problems.

    Then summer kicks in on the Gulf, and my hot humid bathroom that somehow missed my great AC, and I have 80 degrees again, and the white patches start coming back and deteriorating. Then I read on forums about the evaporation process and heat, so I see what happens if I leave the feed/filter lid off of my Eclipse 12. And I end up with near constant 76 degrees.

    It's been about a week now... and they are looking their best! It doesn't look all that great to see the filter pads and everything, but who cares, the neons look a lot better.

    Then I hear many many people keep neons just fine with their discus, notoriously high temps.

    All I know is I hope to be sticking with my 76-78 degrees. I hear temps toward the lower range of the fish can do things like... inhibit bacteria infection (Columnaris loves summer temps) lower the fish metabolism, and prolong the life of the fish supposedly.

    The other reason I wanted to try it, was because years ago in our old tank with only bimonthly water changes, we had it about 75 or something, and none of our fish got sick once.

    I guess the jury's out... you just have to see what works best for your neons, and make gradual changes.

  4. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    When the water gets hotter, it reduces the rate at which oxygen is dissolved into your tank. I would drop in an airstone to break the surface tension of the water and see if you can get more oxygen into the tank. That's why I was asking about the fish gasping for air.

    That's all I can think of at this point.

    james

  5. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by jttt3
    When the water gets hotter, it reduces the rate at which oxygen is dissolved into your tank. I would drop in an airstone to break the surface tension of the water and see if you can get more oxygen into the tank. That's why I was asking about the fish gasping for air.

    That's all I can think of at this point.

    james
    I do have two airstones in the tank and a power filter that both add significant bubbles to the tank. You can easily see the tiny bubbles just floating around in the water. Although my tank is a hex tank, so my actual surface area at the top of the tank is signicantly less.

  6. #16

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by naiku
    I already have this in a thread in the beginner forum, but figured I would post here too......... on Thursday we bought 8 neons for our 10G tank (nothing else in the tank).......... we had previous problems with ammonia (killed 3 goldfish) and so had the tank cycling......... we had the LFS test our water twice, and the last time we were there the ammonia was a little high, so we left it another few days, tested ourselves, were confident of the water and so bought the neons.
    I agree with Lady Hobbs in that your tank is not cycled. The timeline of how your tank was cycled is not clear, but here is how I understand it.

    10 gallon tank
    Added 3 goldfish
    Goldfish go number 1 and 2 in your tank releasing ammonia and starting your cycle.
    3 goldfish die -(ammonia High, not enough bacteria)
    Test water at local fish store and the ammonia is high.
    Let fish tank sit empty until ammonia is 0.
    All of your bacteria ate the left over ammonia
    no new sourceof ammonia for your bacteria and they die.
    Added 8 tetras
    Went number 1 and number 2 in the water
    Ammonia rose because bacteria was all dead from being starved.
    Fish died.

    That is the timeline that I gleam from your post. If this is correct then Hobbs is correct in that the tank is not cycled. I would suggest checking out the fishless cycling sticky as to save other fish the horror of going through a cycle.
    Last edited by hungryhound; 05-17-2007 at 05:06 PM.
    46g planted tank:
    Pearl Gouramis, New Guinea Red Rainbowfish, Siamese algae eaters, Yoyo Loaches, Zebrafish, oto cats, L114 (aka Leopard cactus pleco)

    30g planted tank:
    Celestial Pearl Danios, Red Cherry Shrimp

    20g long planted tank:
    N strain Endlers Live bearers

    5 gallon:
    Half moon betta (blue body, Yellow fins)

    Pictures and My Blog

  7. #17

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by naiku
    I just called the LFS where we bought the neons and they said it could still be ammonia? not sure how that can be since the ammonia is reading 0..........the guy told me neons are very susceptible to ammonia poisoning and that even though our tank is a month old its still new enough for ammonia to kill the neons.......... then suggested doing a 25% water change (already did a 50%) and let it sit for a week before trying some bigger tetras.

    Not sure what other tetras to get, but will be leaving the tank until at least next Thursday before I add anything to it.
    If the tank is sitting empty then all of the bacteria will die as they will have no source of ammonia. You would be best to read the sticky on fishless cycling or add either 1 goldfish or 1 zebra danio and use them to cycle.

    Using more than one fish in a small ten gallon tank will cause the ammonia to build up quicker than your bacteria colony can grow. This will cause you to see lethal levels of ammonia and kill your fish.

    Either way you have to have a constant supply of food for the bacteria. Without it they will die off.
    46g planted tank:
    Pearl Gouramis, New Guinea Red Rainbowfish, Siamese algae eaters, Yoyo Loaches, Zebrafish, oto cats, L114 (aka Leopard cactus pleco)

    30g planted tank:
    Celestial Pearl Danios, Red Cherry Shrimp

    20g long planted tank:
    N strain Endlers Live bearers

    5 gallon:
    Half moon betta (blue body, Yellow fins)

    Pictures and My Blog

  8. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Broken down like that, I agree.

  9. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by hungryhound
    I agree with Lady Hobbs in that your tank is not cycled. The timeline of how your tank was cycled is not clear, but here is how I understand it.

    10 gallon tank
    Added 3 goldfish
    Goldfish go number 1 and 2 in your tank releasing ammonia and starting your cycle.
    3 goldfish die -(ammonia High, not enough bacteria)
    Test water at local fish store and the ammonia is high.
    Let fish tank sit empty until ammonia is 0.
    All of your bacteria ate the left over ammonia
    no new sourceof ammonia for your bacteria and they die.
    Added 8 tetras
    Went number 1 and number 2 in the water
    Ammonia rose because bacteria was all dead from being starved.
    Fish died.

    That is the timeline that I gleam from your post. If this is correct then Hobbs is correct in that the tank is not cycled. I would suggest checking out the fishless cycling sticky as to save other fish the horror of going through a cycle.
    I'd say this is just about about spot on.
    That bacteria can't live forever without a food source!!!
    Also, adding 8 fish all at once in a (now determined) uncycled tank will cause a large spike in ammonia--which is probably the culprit of your problems.

    The smaller the tank, the more careful you have to be with keeping up with good water parameters! THIS IS IMPERATIVE!
    Constant water changes (say 25%) will help dilute the ammonia levels to a less-toxic (but still deadly) level. Remember, the good bacteria don't float around in the water...they live in filter media and your substrate...so doing water changes is a good thing (use a good conditioner!)

    My opinion would be COMPLETELY clean out your tank, gravel, etc, and start completely over.
    Do a complete fishless cycle with PURE ammonia...
    And when you are finally ready to add fish, only add a few at a time...

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