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Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. Default Increasing light via white paper or aluminum foil?


    0 Not allowed!
    My tank is currently set up in a way which only 1 side is viewed. It's 20 watts on a ten gallon, which is apparently considered low light due to small tank size, however, if I were to line the three undisplayed sides of my aquarium with white paper, how significantly would that raise the light level?

    Or is this a completely ridiculous idea lol.

  2. #2

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Why not just get low light plants like anubias or java moss.

  3. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Oh I have a java fern and java moss at the moment. The tank's just looking a bit empty, and I'm also just curious.

  4. #4

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Mylar makes a much better reflector. Glossy white paint comes in second.
    <-- Click for journals
    "There is no right way to do the wrong thing." - KingFisher "Only bad things happen fast in this hobby" - Cliff Boo train boo train boo train boo train woohoo

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    East Lansing, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    1,614

    Awards Showcase

    Thanks for the comfort. :) - Mrs.JayMay23 time for new stock? - Lady Hobbs fishie, fishie in the sea - Lady Hobbs more fish - Lady Hobbs smarty-pants! - Brhino 
    thanks for the help - genocidex for your good info on ugfs - fishmommie 

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by Essidi
    My tank is currently set up in a way which only 1 side is viewed. It's 20 watts on a ten gallon, which is apparently considered low light due to small tank size, however, if I were to line the three undisplayed sides of my aquarium with white paper, how significantly would that raise the light level?
    Or is this a completely ridiculous idea lol.
    Not ridiculous, but not particularly useful either. Sorry.

    The question that does matter is what type of light and fixture?
    If you have the standard (roughly 18") 15 to 18 watt flourescent tube/bulb/lamp then yes, that is low to moderate lighting.

    A nearly perfect, in my opinion, setup for 12" tall tanks is incandescent strip light fixtures with Sylvania, 23 watt, daylight, "Now smaller than ever", spiral compact bulbs.

    Fortunately, there are a lot of plants that can thrive in your tank. A number of cryptocorynes, most stem plants, anubis, java ferns, etc.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Somewhere Between Heaven and Hell
    Posts
    154
    Heres for your tank and making it all pretty with your substrate and luck with cycling it  :) Sorry for misunderstanding!!! - CassieLEO 

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    You can put a mirror as thats the best reflector of light. Remember when we were kids we would shine sunlight in the houses using small mirrors.

    Tank 1 : 18.7 G Planted 100% Flourite : Amano Shrimps, Red Cherry Shrimps, Endlers. Guppies.
    Tank 2: 8.4 G : Planted Tank Mix of Flourite and Azoo Plant Grower. 8 Danios, Amanos (Plant Propagation Tank)
    Tank 3 : 8.4 G : Mix of Flourite and Azoo Plant Grower.6 Slender Rasboras
    Weekly Liquid Dosing of Nitrate, Potassium, Phosphate, Magnesium, CSM+B and Iron Nutrients for Plants.

  7. #7

    Smile


    0 Not allowed!
    Putting any type of reflector around the tank will do little as far as increasing lighting to plants. Rather, add aluminum foil inside the light housing will increase lighting a good bit. Still, the best solution is a CFL bulb(s) of the correct temperature for plants (if your hood uses 'screw in' bulbs.
    Knowledge is fun(damental)

    A 75 gal with eight Discus, fake plants, and a lot of wood also with sand substrate. Clean up crew is down to just two Sterba's Corys. Filters: continuous new water flow; canister w/UV, in-tank algae scrubber!! Finally, junked the nitrate removal unit from hell.

    For Fishless cycling:http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/aqua...ead.php?t=5640

  8. #8

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by dbosman
    The question that does matter is what type of light and fixture?
    If you have the standard (roughly 18") 15 to 18 watt flourescent tube/bulb/lamp then yes, that is low to moderate lighting.
    Correct. If you had 20W of LED over that tank then you'd have a pretty bright tank, but I'm going to assume that this is either a T8 light or a CFL.

    A cheap solution is to go and get a clamp on light from a hardware store and buy cool white bulbs in the highest wattages available. A better solution, that would also be a little more aesthetically pleasing, is a T5 fixture. You probably won't need a T5HO fixture for that size tank.

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