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Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12
  1. Default best lighting setup for a 75 gallon tank


    0 Not allowed!
    I will eventually be moving all of the fish, and decor from my 46 gallon to my 75 gallon tank once I get a larger tank for my goldfish, and I will need to up the light If I want to be able to grow plants.

    so in the tank, I will have 16 glow light tetras for sure (I plan on adding about that many more once I move them into the 75) a bout 8 peppered corries, and two kissing gourmais, and one bristle nose pleco.

    Im not sure what the best way to light the tank will be, run one long light, two smaller ones, a suspened light, a raised light, a open top light, what kind of lights, ect, ect, ect...

    so if anyone has any tips on the best way to light a 75 gallon for about 2 WPG, please fell free to chime in.

    thanks everyone.

  2. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    This Fixture. For a couple of reasons.

    1. Easy to set-up, comes with legs.
    2. 108w T5 HO lighting is going to get you close to ~ 2w/gal of normal fluorescent. Even if it is a little shy, you want to start with lowish lighting anyways. High Lights don't give you a whole lot of room for error (e.g. algae hell).

    Consider a carbon source. Don't be afraid of DIY. 2 3L bottles of fermenting yeast solution keeps my 75g with at least 15ppm CO2 for 3 weeks at a time.

    Consider fertilizing. A digital scale, 20 bucks worth of dry ferts, and you can mix up 2 solutions that you add once per day.

    My 75g has an enormous Amazon sword, tons of thriving Anacharis, and a couple huge blobs of java moss with the above set-up.

  3. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    thats actually not that bad of a price for that big of a fixture.

    is there any reason why one light is better than two?

    my other worry was about covering the entire tank because the tank is much deeper (front to back) than say a 55 gallon. Will that light give me good coverage?

  4. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    It gives me good coverage.

    1 fixture with 2 builbs means you could add another at a later date, and still come out cheaper than if you had bought the 4 bulb version

    That fixture was 109$ 2 weeks ago, wholesaler prices went up (verfied this with my LFS). The saltwater version is still $109 though...only difference is that one of the bulbs is Actinic, which you'd want to replace since actinics don't do much for FW tanks.

    Saltwater version for $109
    Last edited by Commodore 64; 01-23-2009 at 03:45 PM.

  5. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Im sure I could shop around and find a better price, or a sale, ect. Im not in that big of a hurry, so I have some time to bargen hunt, lol.

    thanks for the help.

    Is there anyone who would run two lights over one?

  6. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Here's a really cheap light. I have the 3ft one on my 30g long with the 10k bulbs and my plants are doing great. And the fixture is great too. And yeah, the more light the more/better algae grows. I've had the tank up for exactly one month now. And I'm already getting algae on the glass. And the lights are never on for more than 12hrs. a day.

  7. #7

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    How about a shop light from Home Depot or Lowes and upgrading the bulbs? Algenco has great plants using those lights. Ask him which bulbs he gets if you're interested. It's a GE "something" but I can never remember which one.

  8. #8

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Its a GE plant light. It works great and i use them on all my tanks, and plan to use it on my 75..

  9. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    If you're DIY inclined, you might want to look at cooking up some home brew ODNO (Over Driven Normal Output) lighting solutions. With a little electrical know-how you can get lots of light out of T12 and T8 bulbs on the cheap. Consider a pair of 48" shop lights can be had for around $20 (gut one or both for wires and ballast), similarly a pair of 6500K Daylight tubes from GE can be had for $10/ea. So, for around $40 you can have on the order of 140-160Watts of light over a 4' tank from a single pair of T12 bulbs. Granted, the life of the bulbs is slashed roughly in half (darn it all anyway) but should still be good for a year.

    Edit - The GE EcoLux Daylight Bulb, in addition to putting out the desirable 6500K light, also has one of the highest lumen output ratings I've seen on a T12 bulb. This translates into more light output per watt.

    Links -
    Overdriven Normal Output Thread
    Power consumption vs. Light Output of NO and ODNO lighting
    Last edited by W_Oz; 01-26-2009 at 04:59 AM.

  10. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by W_Oz
    If you're DIY inclined, you might want to look at cooking up some home brew ODNO (Over Driven Normal Output) lighting solutions. With a little electrical know-how you can get lots of light out of T12 and T8 bulbs on the cheap. Consider a pair of 48" shop lights can be had for around $20 (gut one or both for wires and ballast), similarly a pair of 6500K Daylight tubes from GE can be had for $10/ea. So, for around $40 you can have on the order of 140-160Watts of light over a 4' tank from a single pair of T12 bulbs. Granted, the life of the bulbs is slashed roughly in half (darn it all anyway) but should still be good for a year.

    Edit - The GE EcoLux Daylight Bulb, in addition to putting out the desirable 6500K light, also has one of the highest lumen output ratings I've seen on a T12 bulb. This translates into more light output per watt.

    Links -
    Overdriven Normal Output Thread
    Power consumption vs. Light Output of NO and ODNO lighting
    that sounds like something that I might have to look into. I bet I could even strip the paint off of the shop light fixture and polish it to make a reflector.

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