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Results 11 to 20 of 30
  1. #11

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    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by slimey
    Well in Australia we have the top 10 most deadliest snakes in the world and i don't like killing things that don't need to be killed either but when these things come into your backyard and threaten the lives of your family you do what you need to do so that no one gets killed.
    The snakes over here are extremely aggressive and most of them if someone just merely walks past them they will bite you.
    The stupid thing about the snakes over here is that they are protected and your not supposed to kill them, so if you find one in your backyard your meant to call a bloke and he will come around and catch it, thats providing the snake doesn't take off somewhere and hide until he gets there, and that's where they get dangerous.
    They take off and hide, the bloke that catches them can't find them, you can't find them and they're left there for you to stumble upon one day when you least expect it.
    Believe me if someones first thought is to get rid of the danger in there own backyard and that means a bang on the head well good luck to em, because they've done the family a favour.
    Sorry if i've offended all the people that have posted a "don't kill the snakes" comment but quite obviously they havn't had alot to do with them or live in a place where the snakes don't turn up on there door steps every second day.
    Like I said...I work with venomous snakes very often and probably understand them more than 99% of the people on here. They may not be the top 10 deadliest, but people have lost their lives and limbs from their bodies over them.
    -Jordan
    Gar connaisseur

    Predatory Tank:
    20" Tropical Gar, 18" Florida Gar, 20" Longnose Gar,
    17" Ornate Bichir, 25" Silver Arowana, 16" Bowfin, 15" Giant Gourami

    16" Male Dovii

  2. #12

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    0 Not allowed!
    See this is the thing that annoys me a bit, just because some people like to handle them and as you say in the above quote, put yourself in a position to get bitten is totally different to having them in your backyard.
    Now i could nearly bet money, that you would do most of your snake handling in a controlled environment right? For example: You know what snake you have, you have the right sort of equipment to handle them, they would most likely be in a small area where you could put them down and they can't take off and hide.
    Can you see what i'm trying to say here, your ready for them, if one gets loose you can catch it and put it in a bag.
    The everyday, ordinary person can't do this, they havn't got the luxury of a controlled environment, they have jobs to do and can't wait 6 or 8 hours for a bloke to come and catch it, they have kids and animals that like to play out in the yard and don't want them stumbling across a snake that has been left there because someone says that you should leave them alone.
    Most of the time snakes aren't killed out of ignorance, fear, yeah because thay can kill you, your dog, your kids and so on.
    Now don't get me wrong, i don't have a problem with snakes generally, if they're out in the bush i'll have a look at them and enjoy watching them for a while and leave them be, but if they're in my little part of the world then i have a problem with them.
    Three-fourths of the Earth's surface is water, and one-fourth is land. It is quite clear that the good Lord intended us to spend triple the amount of time fishing as taking care of the lawn. ~Chuck Clark

  3. #13

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    0 Not allowed!
    I have spent several years working with wild Eastern Timber Rattlesnakes, Massaugas, and Copperheads...in their wild environments. This work has been done under the issuance of a permit in cooperation w/ the Pennsylvania Fish & Boat Commission...ie...none of these snakes are handled in a controlled environment (they are protected by PA law and are not to be harmed nor removed from the wild without permission given from the state of PA). This work was done in order to help survey the snake populations, sexes, and estimated age/size.

    These snakes are also in my back yard and in the yards of many friends an family members of mine...some choose to leave them alone and others choose to kill them. I cannot say weather this is right or wrong, but I personally will not do such a thing. You are also much more likely to get bitten while trying to kill the snake rather than just going inside and waiting. Even if you do kill that one snake...there is always another waiting somewhere. Whichever route you choose...be careful in doing so. All it takes is one screw up or misplaced step and you could be in a very bad situation.
    Last edited by Demjor19; 03-14-2009 at 03:50 AM.
    -Jordan
    Gar connaisseur

    Predatory Tank:
    20" Tropical Gar, 18" Florida Gar, 20" Longnose Gar,
    17" Ornate Bichir, 25" Silver Arowana, 16" Bowfin, 15" Giant Gourami

    16" Male Dovii

  4. #14

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    0 Not allowed!
    Slimey, I stumble across venomous snakes in my backyard or while walking my dogs or hiking with my nieces and brothers very often. I live within very easy walking distance of a state park that has an abundant population of venomous snakes. I think about the worst thing you could do for your children in an area densely populated by venomous snakes is to let them see you regularly interacting with and attacking these snakes. You may tell them the proper way to deal with snakes they come across, but your actions speak louder than your words and when they are faced with the situation themselves their instincts will likely be to react the way they have seen the adults they emulate react.

    In Australia, more people are killed annually by horses or honeybees than by venomous snakes. Do you also kill any bees or horses you see near your children or dogs?

    Also, Demjor19 and I are both writing from the US, which actually has more snake bite deaths annually than Australia, so there is no need to be condescending and act as though we couldn't possibly understand your predicament.

    Even when Australia's supposedly hyper-aggressive man-hunting snakes bites, they very often inflict dry bites (don't inject any venom). Australia likes to hype their deadly snakes like crazy for some reason, so I can understand the paranoia, but to be honest if you exercise a bit of common sense the danger is negligible.

  5. #15

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    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by block2
    Hi All,

    Thanks for the info and advice, I have tryed explaining to my wife that the snakes are non poisionus, but she is still adamant that they are dangererous...especially has we have the children here. I think personally it is inbred in them from been born the same as the thai dogs that all snakes are dangerous. Only the other month a woman in the village was bit by a snake as she slept and died a few hours later.

    The link I put in my original post regarding one bite off this and you dead in 15 minutes is taken from a snake farm/show. There are many here in thailand for the tourists as well as the Thais...I suppose with headlines like that and pictures like that it does not help the snake community of Thailand.

    I have been doing a bit of research on the snakes of Thailand and have now started to understand them a bit more...What i have learnt recently is if a snake runs it's 90% non poisionus...if it stands and not flees there's a 90% chance it's poisionus.

    Here's a couple of pics of a couple of snakes mating in the stream that runs along the side of the house. I could of easily have dropped a couple of large stones on them but decided against it having started my research.


    Jeff
    I am very glad to hear you have been doing research. I certainly can't fault someone for fearing for their children, but the best thing to teach your children is to not interact with and attack them. I know that that is hard to do when so many areas have a very set in stone cultural bias against all snakes. I encourage you to continue with your research, and would love to see more pictures (taken froma safe distance, of course) of the snakes you come across.

  6. #16

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    0 Not allowed!
    I'd also like to add for anyone interested in keeping snakes in their vicinity to a minimum without attacking them themselves, inviting in your local raptors is a good way to go. I have helped several families establish owl boxes that have attracted residents. If you look into your local birds of prey and set up an ideal little home for them, there is a good chance you can convince one to establish your yard as part of it's territory. In addition to often eating all sorts of snakes, these birds will also eat the scrumptious little animals that attract many of the snakes in the first place. It is worth looking in to for those of you seeking a little more peace of mind.

  7. #17

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    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by Allecto
    Slimey, I stumble across venomous snakes in my backyard or while walking my dogs or hiking with my nieces and brothers very often. I live within very easy walking distance of a state park that has an abundant population of venomous snakes. I think about the worst thing you could do for your children in an area densely populated by venomous snakes is to let them see you regularly interacting with and attacking these snakes. You may tell them the proper way to deal with snakes they come across, but your actions speak louder than your words and when they are faced with the situation themselves their instincts will likely be to react the way they have seen the adults they emulate react.

    In Australia, more people are killed annually by horses or honeybees than by venomous snakes. Do you also kill any bees or horses you see near your children or dogs?

    Also, Demjor19 and I are both writing from the US, which actually has more snake bite deaths annually than Australia, so there is no need to be condescending and act as though we couldn't possibly understand your predicament.

    Even when Australia's supposedly hyper-aggressive man-hunting snakes bites, they very often inflict dry bites (don't inject any venom). Australia likes to hype their deadly snakes like crazy for some reason, so I can understand the paranoia, but to be honest if you exercise a bit of common sense the danger is negligible.


    The high lighted part of your quote is absolutely ridiculous, no one, with any credibilty, has ever said that the snakes in Australia are man hunting, LOL, i'd really like to know where you got that from. But yes some of the snakes here are extremely aggressive.
    Of course America is going to have more deaths from snake bites because there are more of you overthere than here. It's basic maths, 100 people = 100 possible snake bites, 200 people = 200 possible snake bites.
    Not once was i saying that you couldn't possibly understand our snake situation, all i was telling you was how things are over here and giving you my opinion on a topic.
    I wasn't being condescending at all, everything i have mentioned is a fact and i was not saying that just because we have the more dangerous snakes that i'm in a worse situation.
    Demjor and i were actually having a conversation about this topic and expressing our opinions in a civil manner, you on the other hand, sort of gave an opinion and quite rudely attacked mine.
    I think that you should except another persons opinion on a topic rather than just thinking that your own is the only one that counts.
    Three-fourths of the Earth's surface is water, and one-fourth is land. It is quite clear that the good Lord intended us to spend triple the amount of time fishing as taking care of the lawn. ~Chuck Clark

  8. #18

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    "The snakes over here are extremely aggressive and most of them if someone just merely walks past them they will bite you."


    Extremely aaggressively attacking something that 'just merely walks past' =hunting. In this case, men. Man-hunting. And Australia definitely hypes the dangers of it's snakes. I would also like to know what you base your assertions of the aggression of Australia's venomous snakes on (this is a genuine question) because all the herping articles or field herpers I have spoken with at reptile shows remark on how generally tractable and avoidant of humans they are, if given the option. If I made you feel attacked by disagreeing with the actions you advocated, I apologize. My only intent was to disagree.

    I addressed you directly because I felt (and still feel) that you are expressing your disdain for the anti-slaughter sentiment in a very condescending manner. If calling the opinions and experiences of others annoying, or saying the protection of snakes is stupid, or stating "Sorry if i've offended all the people that have posted a "don't kill the snakes" comment but quite obviously they havn't had alot to do with them or live in a place where the snakes don't turn up on there door steps every second day." was not meant in a condescending manner at all, then I apologize for the misinterpretation. Clearly, we both should be more aware of how we come across when discussing things that make us peevish.

    I also think the reputation of Australia's snakes as the deadliest is flawed. Sri Lanka has a lower population, and a much higher serious bite/fatality rate. Australian snakes' venom may be the most proficient at killing mice in lab studies, but that is just one of many, many factors to take into consideration in calculating the dangers to humans.

    I certainly haven't meant to attack anyone, but when your first post is advocating the killing of snakes, I don't feel good about not pointing out how following that advice could be the very thing that puts someone in danger--- maybe I've just taught too many rattle-snake avoidance classes though, lol. I am not asking you not to share your opinion, I would in fact love to have some more info from you (as requested above) I just think that following the advice you happen to be giving in this thread could be put someone in harm's way--- someone other than just the snakes, that is.

  9. #19

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Extremely aaggressively attacking something that 'just merely walks past' =hunting. In this case, men. Man-hunting. And Australia definitely hypes the dangers of it's snakes. I would also like to know what you base your assertions of the aggression of Australia's venomous snakes on (this is a genuine question) because all the herping articles or field herpers I have spoken with at reptile shows remark on how generally tractable and avoidant of humans they are, if given the option. If I made you feel attacked by disagreeing with the actions you advocated, I apologize. My only intent was to disagree.

    I also think the reputation of Australia's snakes as the deadliest is flawed. Sri Lanka has a lower population, and a much higher serious bite/fatality rate. Australian snakes' venom may be the most proficient at killing mice in lab studies, but that is just one of many, many factors to take into consideration in calculating the dangers to humans.

    This is what hunting is.
    1. The activity or sport of pursuing game.
    2. The act of conducting a search for something:
    Snakes don't look for people to bite or eat.

    The act of a snake striking or biting a human is an aggressive act of self defence.

    Some people get confused about what a deadly snake and a dangerous snake is. There's two lists, one is a list from one to ten deadliest snakes which rates the potency of the snakes venom. The other list is the dangerous snake list which rates the snake on aggression and where they are situated.
    I'll give you an example: The Fierce snake (Inland Taipan) is rated the most deadliest snake in the world because of it's venoms toxicity, but it's rated at ten on the dangerous snake list because it very rarely comes in contact with humans.
    The viper snakes, are more dangerous because they like moveing around built up, more populated areas.
    I think the snake in Sri Lanka that you said does more damage than the ones here is a carpet viper or saw scaled viper because they look for food in these areas.
    The snake most commonly quoted by you and most other Americans is the Rattle snake and it doesn't make either of the lists.
    Australia has less fatalities from snake bites because i believe that the availability of anti-venoms is second to none.
    In Australia we have at least three or so different snakes that all like to move around populated areas, the Death Adder, Tiger snake, Eastern brown snake, Taipan.
    All of these snakes are aggressive if they are put in a position where they feel threatened.
    When the snakes enter backyards and curl up in a garden or lay around near a childs sand pit and a human approaches these snakes unknowingly, there is no warning, no rattle, they just strike.
    By the time you realize that the snake is there you havn't been able to give the snake or yourself an escape option.
    The Tiger snake is very common around my area and believe me or not these snakes are the most crankiest snake i've seen.LOL
    They won't turn the other way when someone comes across them in a yard.
    A little girl in a suburb of my city was bitten in the front yard of her home when she went to get an icecream from the icecream van and the snake just stayed where it was.
    An elderly lady was bitten twice on the hand when she was weeding her garden because the tiger snake held it's ground instead of retreating.
    Some snakes will go the other way when a human comes around but not these ones.

    I don't run around killing snakes and i don't tell anyone to do so, but as i said earlier, if i see a snake in the bush i enjoy them but if they're in my part of the world and pose a threat then i deal with it.

    I except your apology and i also apoligise if i sounded nasty at all, it's so hard to talk on a forum when you can't show expressions, do you know what i mean?
    Three-fourths of the Earth's surface is water, and one-fourth is land. It is quite clear that the good Lord intended us to spend triple the amount of time fishing as taking care of the lawn. ~Chuck Clark

  10. #20

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    FYI...the Black Mamba is the deadliest snake in the world. the Taipan is ranked #4 on most lists I have seen. In fact Australia only has one snake on the "top five deadliest" list and that is the Taipan. Just food for thought...
    -Jordan
    Gar connaisseur

    Predatory Tank:
    20" Tropical Gar, 18" Florida Gar, 20" Longnose Gar,
    17" Ornate Bichir, 25" Silver Arowana, 16" Bowfin, 15" Giant Gourami

    16" Male Dovii

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