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Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 20 of 20
  1. #11

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    0 Not allowed!
    Kaybee, unfortunately I think the most commonly available fish on that list is the Moorish Idol. The only reason I've not seen them in my area is my LFS is too responsible to order them, however not all are that way. Moorish Idols are all to available and all to affordable. I'd say that the second most common on is the Panther Grouper.
    Another one that is commonly available is the Bluestreak Cleaner Wrasse. These are especially disturbing since every cleaner in captivity represents one less cleaner on the reefs cleaning up parasites there.
    Considering a Marine Aquarium? A Breakdown of the Components, Live Rock, Cycling a Marine Tank

    "The capacity to learn is a gift; The ability to learn is a skill; The WILLINGNESS to learn is a choice." - Unknown

  2. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Thanks for the effort put in, I think the moorish just needs the right conditions to get it feeding however. My friends father had one in a tank of about 130 gallons and he kept it for about 1 in one tank and then another 6 months or so in another tank. The only reason it died was because of the tank breaking a few days after a child was hitting the glass. So I wouldn't say they are impossible to keep in captivity. His was feeding on urchin, flake, brine shrimp etc and was very healthy.

  3. #13

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    0 Not allowed!
    Lowflyer, I would direct you to the December 2007 issue of Tropical Fish Hobbyist. Moorish Idols have a lifespan of 10-20 years so 1 year is not a success at all. There is a very good reason all the experts tell you not to keep them. The writer of that article tracked nearly 300 specimens for 2 years, and in 2 years all were dead, including 6 specimens he kept himself in a 450gal tank. The problem is that they may eat fine for a few months or even a couple of years, but once they stop eating they will not start eating again and they will stop eating at some point, it happens to 99.9% of all Idols in captivity. They are better left on the reefs, thousands die needlessly in captivity every year and this aught not to be happening. Maybe someday we will be able to successfully keep them, but for now, that is just not the case.
    Considering a Marine Aquarium? A Breakdown of the Components, Live Rock, Cycling a Marine Tank

    "The capacity to learn is a gift; The ability to learn is a skill; The WILLINGNESS to learn is a choice." - Unknown

  4. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Good post... I'll have to tell my LFS to stop bringing in nurse sharks.
    100g Reef

  5. #15

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    0 Not allowed!
    Great post!

  6. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    i dont know if this is obvious, but a beginner souldn't keep lionfish if they can't look but no touchie touchie

  7. #17

    Smile


    0 Not allowed!
    Thanks as always GB, Great post.
    I keep a Ribbon eel as well as Moray's. True, at 1st the Ribbon was notoriously difficult to feed, had to keep offering food for day's. Since they can go 3 weeks without eating, I was not truly concerned. He now eats every third day with no problem. The Moray's are fed every 2nd day. Amazingly, all are different sizes, yet more often than not, they will share a hole in the rock and hang out! I have seen no conflict amongst themselves and or seen them go after any of the fish in my Tank.
    IMO, well fed = lazy...
    Life is tough, it's even tougher if your stupid.
    If your not angry, your not paying attention...
    150G Cube FWLR (Morays) 75G Fresh (Bichers/Gourami) 24G Cube (Reef/Goby/Seahorse's/Garden Eels)
    10G Fresh (Beta)
    2 x 29G Breeders (cycling) to be ready for January 15

  8. #18

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    0 Not allowed!
    There is one fish that can now be removed from this list due to successful captive breeding. :) The Pinnate Batfish - Platax pinnatus has now been successful captive bred and is being raised in captivity with great success. Live Aquaria is now offering tank-bred specimens on their site. A large aquarium is still required for these beautiful fish.
    Considering a Marine Aquarium? A Breakdown of the Components, Live Rock, Cycling a Marine Tank

    "The capacity to learn is a gift; The ability to learn is a skill; The WILLINGNESS to learn is a choice." - Unknown

  9. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    shouldnt beginners (like myself) just stay away from SW all together ;)

    lol this list is so long. Can't I just have a list of fish I CAN keep? lol jk. Great work!
    RIP Shark Bait, my Red Tail Shark :(

  10. #20

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    0 Not allowed!
    There are a lot of good beginner marine fish out there, like chromis for example.

    The list of fish you could keep would be just as long as the one you should not keep.

    Weather you are keeping a FW or SW tank, the secert to success for anyone new to the hobby is the amount or research completed before setting up your tank. The more you learn before you start, the more successfull you will be. That applies equally to FW and SW. You just have to keep in mind SW is more expensive and there is a little more to SW but you can learn it as easy as learning anything else.
    If you take your time to do the research FIRST, you can successfully set-up and keep ANY type of aquarium with ease.
    "Not using a quarantine tank is like playing Russian roulette. Nobody wins the game, some people just get to play longer than others." - Anthony Calfo
    Fishless Cycle Cycling with Fish Marine Aquarium Info [URL="http://saltwater.aquaticcommunity.com/"]

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