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  1. #1

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    Default Possible killie breeding tank


    0 Not allowed!
    I was talking to my dept manager yesterday and he said that they don't have a supplier for killies, they just take them in as people give them which isn't too often, even though they are in fairly high demand. So this gets my thinking, they'd probably pay quite a bit for some killie fry.....I got rid of my guppy breeding thing because they weren't really in high demand, so now i have a spare 13 gallon.
    What kind of killies could I breed in here? I was thinking golden wonders or some other easy to breed killie. I think I'll just leave some killies in there and let them breed themselves, collecting the fry as I find them. Or I could separate eggs and parents if I need to.
    Any tips or suggestions?

  2. #2

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    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Killi eggs take a few weeks to hatch, so i'd jus remove them. Maybe breed them then take them out and put in another tank then rear the eggs in tht tank?

    50G Tank - Kyathit Danios, Zebra Danio, Swordtails, Silver Hatchetfish, Platy, Gold Barbs, Cherry Barbs, Bolivian Rams, Apisto, Zebra Loaches.
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    Wanted: More CPD's and Loaches.
    Keep updated with my fish world in my Blog! And my tanks Blog!


  3. #3

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    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    If you want to make big bucks then sell the Nothobranchius Rachovii especially the Biera 98 one if amazing and has been named the most beautiful freshwater fish by many. I bred them for more than a year and it is really easy if you put your heart to it... you can buy eggs from a breeder and you are ready to go...

    When breeding you need to harvest the eggs on a spawning mop and let keep them in peat for upto 6-8 weeks before re-introducing them to water to hatch them.
    Last edited by Fishalicious; 01-29-2008 at 06:30 PM.
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  4. #4

    Join Date
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    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Thanks Jess,
    Nothobranchius Rachovii are easy? Wow those are one of my favourite colored fish, better than most reef fish! I'd love to get a bunch of those guys!
    What kind of peat would i use? Just regular old aqaurium peat? Should the peat be moist and what temp can it be kept at?
    Last edited by NickFish; 01-30-2008 at 01:41 AM.

  5. #5

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    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by Fishalicious
    If you want to make big bucks then sell the Nothobranchius Rachovii especially the Biera 98 one if amazing and has been named the most beautiful freshwater fish by many. I bred them for more than a year and it is really easy if you put your heart to it... you can buy eggs from a breeder and you are ready to go...

    When breeding you need to harvest the eggs on a spawning mop and let keep them in peat for upto 6-8 weeks before re-introducing them to water to hatch them.
    LoL we're of the same mind again, Jess. Soon as I saw Nick's post a second ago I thought of ole rachovii.
    Nick, books and internet photos in no way accurately portray the unmatched brilliance of Rachovii males.
    Just aquarium peat is used. After the eggs are laid, you put they and the peat in a sealed plastic bag. Put them in a cool, dark closet for about six or eight weeks. The peat should be moist but not wet in the bag.
    After the time, set up a 10 gallon with a mature sponge filter. Without the water, add the peat and eggs to the bottom of the tank. Fill the tank slowly with water in the mid to upper 70's. Eggs should all be hatched in a day. The fry aren't difficult to raise.
    There's more to it, of course, but if you do your research on the fish they aren't difficult to keep and breed. You don't need a large tank either. You could keep a colony of several individuals of varying ages in a 20 gallon tank.
    If your library is well-equipped, there's bound to be a book on keeping killies in it.

    Dave
    When a finger points to the moon, the imbecile looks at the finger.

    Omnia mutantur nihil interit.

    The more you read, the more things you will know. The more that you learn, the more places you'll go

  6. #6

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    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Thanks Dave,
    Research time!

  7. #7

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    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    WOW....that is weird how you have to hatch the eggs.

    How come you have to put them in peat for 6-8 weeks??

  8. #8

    Join Date
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    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by squirt_12
    WOW....that is weird how you have to hatch the eggs.

    How come you have to put them in peat for 6-8 weeks??
    Because in nature they spend that time entombed in mud waiting for the rain. The enzymes that occur within the ova during that time get the eggs ready to hatch as soon as the rains start to fill the pool. Without the 6-8 weeks in the dark and cool, only a very, very few would hatch if left in the tank, and the rest of the eggs would be dead. Its the same kind of thing needed for some kinds of aquatic plant bulbs, they need a rest period over weeks or months to get ready to grow again.
    Both the killies and the plants have that survival strategy; hibernate until conditions improve again.
    Not all kinds of killies have to have their eggs stored for weeks like that, but some of the really desirable species do. Not all, though. Aphyosemion bivittatatum, A sjoestedti and A. australe, as three examples, are beautiful fishes in both sexes that live for several years in aquariums and scatter eggs like a normal egg layer, though it usually takes at least a couple weeks for the eggs to hatch, though some species' eggs can take a couple months to hatch. Only thing you need with those fish is soft, slightly acid water and occasional live food. Great fish.
    You can keep them in harems, with one male with a number of females. Larger tank, say a 55 or greater, and you could keep several males and their attendant females. Males spar a bit, but do no damage.
    Killies do great in well-planted tanks, but they are usually kept in single species tanks due to the slow, deliberateness of them feeding, as quicker species, like tetras, would get all the food before the killies could get to it. The killies prefer temps between 74 and 77.
    Oh, and cover the tank, because in their joy de vie, they are fantastic jumpers. Doesn't matter if you keep them in eight inches of water in a 30 inch high tank, they can clear it. Don't ask how I know this.

    Dave
    When a finger points to the moon, the imbecile looks at the finger.

    Omnia mutantur nihil interit.

    The more you read, the more things you will know. The more that you learn, the more places you'll go

  9. #9

    Join Date
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    For doing such good research!! - Rue   hehe. - Tolley   nascar prize - sailor   Happy Birthday! - squirt_12   For rescuing feeders!  Way to go! - Rue   
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    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Don't ask how I know this.
    lol, ok I'll definetly cover the tank. Glass canopy is probably the tightest so I'll pit one of those on.
    How many could I put in the 13G? 1 male and 2 females? I haven't ordered any eggs yet.

  10. #10

    Join Date
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    a gift as a thank you for adding me as a buddy! - *Sarah*   Congrats on the new fry :) - *Sarah*   *kicks* :P - Drumachine09   Just because! - 2manyfish   Have a great Birthday! - CAF   
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    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave66
    Because in nature they spend that time entombed in mud waiting for the rain. The enzymes that occur within the ova during that time get the eggs ready to hatch as soon as the rains start to fill the pool. Without the 6-8 weeks in the dark and cool, only a very, very few would hatch if left in the tank, and the rest of the eggs would be dead. Its the same kind of thing needed for some kinds of aquatic plant bulbs, they need a rest period over weeks or months to get ready to grow again.
    Both the killies and the plants have that survival strategy; hibernate until conditions improve again.
    Not all kinds of killies have to have their eggs stored for weeks like that, but some of the really desirable species do. Not all, though. Aphyosemion bivittatatum, A sjoestedti and A. australe, as three examples, are beautiful fishes in both sexes that live for several years in aquariums and scatter eggs like a normal egg layer, though it usually takes at least a couple weeks for the eggs to hatch, though some species' eggs can take a couple months to hatch. Only thing you need with those fish is soft, slightly acid water and occasional live food. Great fish.
    You can keep them in harems, with one male with a number of females. Larger tank, say a 55 or greater, and you could keep several males and their attendant females. Males spar a bit, but do no damage.
    Killies do great in well-planted tanks, but they are usually kept in single species tanks due to the slow, deliberateness of them feeding, as quicker species, like tetras, would get all the food before the killies could get to it. The killies prefer temps between 74 and 77.
    Oh, and cover the tank, because in their joy de vie, they are fantastic jumpers. Doesn't matter if you keep them in eight inches of water in a 30 inch high tank, they can clear it. Don't ask how I know this.

    Dave
    ......WOW......WOW.....thats all i have to say...you blew me away with that post. AMAZING. I never knew that the eggs would have to go through that process. That is wicked. Thanks Dave so much.

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