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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by kaybee View Post
    I couldn't make out much at the 30 second mark, but from what I can see at exactly the 58 second mark as well as in the photo that you posted, that fish does not appear to be mouth brooding.

    Also, you have two different type of mbuna's there. The aggressor is indeed a socolofi, but the other (the fish in question) is a zebra (probably a metriaclima callainos/'cobalt blue zebra'). The socolofi's are more 'torpedo' shaped and the zebras are bulker and have wider mouths and lips (zebras are more specialized algae-grazers than socolofi's).

    Mouthbrooders have a full buchal pouch. Below are two pictures of mouthbrooding mbuna's, the first is a socolofi, but I think the yellow lab in the second photo illustrates what a mouthbrooder with a mouthful of eggs/fry looks liker:

    Attachment 57910

    Attachment 57911

    The fullness of the buchal pouch expands as the eggs become fry and the fry become larger fry. The mother releases the fry typically after 18-21 (though I've had them release earlier and well as later than that time frame).

    The mother will fast for practically the entire mouth-brooding period and it seems their yawning reflex is also disabled during this time. They are adapted to go without food this entire time.
    Thanks for the detailed response! If this fish is cobalt zebra so thats mean he and the socolofi wont reproduse together? since i know alot of malawi species can reproduse with other species..
    and do you know to say if he or the socolofi is a male/female?

    and about the last comment,
    im a rescuer who rescue fish . I dont buy animals at all because i think trading living creatures is not good and causing alot of suffering and an enviormental demage. Thats why i dont i kinda "work with what i have" when it comes to populating the tank and right now i have only these 2 that can live together in this tank{i have a tank of rescued goldfish, a tank of rescued livebearears a tankof rescued large catfish and a tank of rescued american cichlids} Im monitoring the aggresion and if it will go too far ill seperate them but for now its seems totaly in check, and also the little shark and pleco are having thier share of taking the socolofi attention

  2. #12

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    I do agree with kaybee, the one is lighter than the other... and if you're right about Zebra Cichlids being bulkier than Socolofi, I might as well go ahead and say it's a Cobalt Blue in there (Don't know if that's what it actually is). I think it's possible your Mbuna is mouth-brooding a few fry, my Peacock Cichlid didn't appear to be holding fry so I guessed she was since she wasn't eating. a few days later, only 3 fry came out. The fewer fry the less the appearance of mouth-brooding. Mouth-brooding mothers are not likely to hold their own against other fish. I would try to move her to a smaller tank and see if she will let the fry out when time comes. Socolofi may think he has a chance to become the dominant fish in the tank since there are only two Mbuna in a large tank. Species will Hybridize at one point or another. Do not keep the fry (if any) unless you are willing to see what their temperament will end up being. Two species, two different temperaments mixed.
    Last edited by The Cichlid Keeper; 04-16-2020 at 03:42 PM.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by kaybee View Post
    Different topic entirely, but mbuna's are on the aggressive side. They do much better in larger groups.

    As is, that socolofi can focus all aggression on that zebra.

    If you had 7-12 more mbuna's, the socolofi could perhaps still be the aggressor but it would most likely randomize who it cases, thereby giving the last fish it chased a chance to relax, or at least receive a much smaller percentage of the aggression that is dealt out, rather than receiving 100% of it.

    Keeping mbuna's in small groups actually tends to increases aggressive behavior.
    I think that the aggression levels do increase, but there is enough space in a large tank for both Mbunas. I recommend more hiding areas so the fish don't see each other too much. This may or may not decrease aggression (More Mbunas, more confusion, less aggression).

    SaveThemAll1: Is it okay if I can see a clear picture of the supposed Cobalt Blue?
    Last edited by The Cichlid Keeper; 04-16-2020 at 04:26 PM.

  4. #14

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    yea ill upload in a moment, but do you know if it is the cobalt, can they reproduce or not?

  5. #15

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  6. #16

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    someone? please...

  7. #17

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    Why don't you want them to breed exactly?

  8. #18

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    The shark will be happy to eat any fry that appear in there. I agree it's piggish to want to horde certain animals when there are plenty of "less desirable" animals in need of a home. Having said that the industry continues to vomit millions of fish into the market and ultimately they all need homes. Some of these fish come from sources that support entire communities truly depending on them. Some not so much. It's important that we discern which if we truly intend on making a positive impact long term and ensure the survival of not only the fish but also the eco-systems they come from for years to come. The balance I try to achieve as a conscientious conservationist is drawing a hardline between which fish are in most need as a species versus which fish can be used to support these more vulnerable species. Breeding the most available species has it's place in so much as creating a natural food source. Breeding the more rare and exotic beauties other hobbyists are willing to pay for doesn't necessarily ensure that these animals will wind up in the hands of people willing to ensure their long-term survival either. We are in the minority. Those of us serious about conservation know who we are and will often give fish away to like-minded individuals for free once they've been "thoroughly vetted". I like to keep a thriving colony of some bullet-proof species as the base of my aquarium "pyramid" if you will, supporting the less robust and more critically endangered. Cichlids are admittedly boney for use as "feeders" but fry and eggs are better than feeding wheat/soy-based mass-produced foods. The best dry foods have pro-biotics added which gives them a limited shelf-life anyway. So yes I keep it around in the winter but I probably throw/give away more than I actually feed to the fish. Let them eat cake!

  9. #19

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    If there are female Mbuna and Male Mbuna in the same aquarium, they're gonna breed. Note that. If you don't want them to breed, or the fry to be eaten, move the females to separate tanks. About the 'shark', might want to move him/her in less than three weeks since Mbunas Mouth brood for about a month.
    Doesn't in the least bit appear to be a Cobalt Blue. What in the world would a grey Mbuna be a Vibrantly colored Cobalt Blue Mbuna? It's just a grey Mbuna of some sort...
    Last edited by The Cichlid Keeper; 04-23-2020 at 05:16 PM.

  10. #20

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    Could be a Cynotilapia mbamba... grey Bulky fish. LOL. Females are the grey ones, males are brilliantly colored. Your female C. mbamba is probably in breeding condition or mouthbrooding causing her to have a bulky appearance. This is why I think it could be Cynotilapia mbamba. Most people will have pictures of males though. Your welcome if this proves correct!
    https://www.malawicichlidhomepage.co..._mbamba11.html
    Last edited by The Cichlid Keeper; 04-23-2020 at 05:40 PM.

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