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Results 11 to 20 of 66
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Dec 2014
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    You need a fish! Welcome to the site! - Plecos   Foe all of your effort on the SW tank - Silbar   thanks for sharing your amazing pics - Silbar   Merry Christmas & Happy New Year! - Plecos   For getting your tank featured in PFM! - Slaphppy7   

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    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by BluewaterBoof View Post
    It is generally considered a waste of money among us freshies. Strips out fertilizers and needs to be changed out fairly often. Some claim that they've had it leach toxins back into the tank, but I haven't researched that at all so I'm not sure if that is anecdotal or not.

    As for the nitrates, I dose up to 40ppm weekly in some of my tanks for plant growth. I have not seen any ill effect on my animals, although I do not wish to prolong it and try my luck with much higher levels. I have more sensitive animals in other tanks in which general care sheets claim to keep nitrates as low as possible to reduce mortality rates, so those are kept between 5-10ppm NO3. After the money and effort spent on those animals, I do not wish to try my luck to disprove it hahaha

    100+ppm of NO3 seems outrageous to me. This is actually the first time I've ever heard someone claim to be keeping their tanks at those levels. I'm curious if @Spardas keeps his reefs and discus tanks at elevated levels like that.
    Mine peaked over that when neglected for 6 months but that's not bad there is quite a few tanks running high nitrates mine are nowhere near that now

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Mar 2017
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    Iowa
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    2 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by BluewaterBoof View Post
    100+ppm of NO3 seems outrageous to me. This is actually the first time I've ever heard someone claim to be keeping their tanks at those levels. I'm curious if @Spardas keeps his reefs and discus tanks at elevated levels like that.
    Before we knew better or had test kits I can only imagine that was a routine number. A dozen fish in a 10G with only a top off for six months so what else could it be? The fish didn't fall over dead. I'd love to see true studies on what fish can actually endure without ill effect. I'm sure it varies WIDELY by species. Summer tub ponds are a new fad. I did it for the first time this year. Tossed highly inbred show guppies and some Koi swords in. WCs about once a month. They saw temps around 61F a number of times. At the end of it all about 200 fry, zero sword deaths and only a couple guppies died. Pretty normal mortality rate even indoors at perfect temp with WCs. Another half dozen guppies with tattered tails and a couple skinny ones. Brought them indoors, euthanized a few and dewormed them all to be safe. Trying to knock the sissy out of some attractive fish so I can sell stuff that won't die like chainstore fish. I do follow modern rules for most of my fish because I can't know for sure what the correct answer really is.
    Last edited by OnTheFly; 10-10-2017 at 11:22 PM.

  3. #13

    Join Date
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    This. Is. SPS!!! - BIO-Linist   Now for somebody to spam you with discus - BIO-Linist   Discus and Beer! - Sandz   Thank you my friend! - JudiJetson   Your "light siesta" suggestion a while back worked wonders last week. Thanks! - ~firefly~   

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    5 Not allowed!
    Generally speaking, my nitrate levels are low (5<) to undetectable depending on the tank. But, to the point of this discussion, there is definitely a varying degree of tolerance depending on the species. That doesn't include the stage of life they're in, the environment they're in, as well as if they're carrying any diseases.There are studies out there that shows that freshwater animals are more sensitive to nitrate than marine animals.

    There are other methods out there of maintaining a balance for a long period of time without a water change, but the important thing is it still keep the parameters relatively stable and good for aquatic life. Think about it, the oceans, lakes, and rivers of the world are just one big fish tank. How is the water recycled and what goes in and out of the water? The key is to understand what goes in and out of your water and understand what you keep.

    As for me, it is easier to do a water change knowing what I'm removing and putting into the tank.
    Think with logic and rationality more than emotion. Act with moderation and consideration. Contemplate ideals and realistic goals and weigh out possibilities and options. Temper not with personal delusions or false hope but learn to accept and move on.


  4. #14

    Join Date
    Jun 2012
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    Thanks for the gift! I bow to your experience so i wanted to be sure that i did not give the OP wrong info. - Silbar   Tx for all the help for me and everyone else! - angelcraze2   Rocksor knows cichlids! - Brhino   Can''t give rep points, but great job on the diagnosis/treatment - Boundava   Sending you a geophagus to  tank you for your analytical powers! - discusluv   

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    2 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by BluewaterBoof View Post
    It is generally considered a waste of money among us freshies. Strips out fertilizers and needs to be changed out fairly often. Some claim that they've had it leach toxins back into the tank, but I haven't researched that at all so I'm not sure if that is anecdotal or not.
    activated carbon cannot leech what is adsorbs under normal conditions in a fish tank. Conditions that would cause leeching of the adsorb material would kill the fish first, large ph swings (like 4 points) or masive heating. The only thing activated carbon leeches is phosphate and that depends on the quality of the carbon, where a higher quality carbon leeches less phosphates.

  5. #15

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    Thanks for the gift! I bow to your experience so i wanted to be sure that i did not give the OP wrong info. - Silbar   Tx for all the help for me and everyone else! - angelcraze2   Rocksor knows cichlids! - Brhino   Can''t give rep points, but great job on the diagnosis/treatment - Boundava   Sending you a geophagus to  tank you for your analytical powers! - discusluv   

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    7 Not allowed!
    If you dont believe this guys argument on keeping nitrates (as nitrogen) below 20ppm, then you can follow up on the research links.

    http://www.oscarfish.com/article-hom...-toxicity.html

    Humic substances like tannins from wood, etc., can prevent uptake of nitrate. One of the reasons why closed systems in nature work.

    https://www.oscarfish.com/forum/gene...html?start=160

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Apr 2015
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    well done - mac   well done - mac   for you sick fish - mac   I'm sorry waylon!  Didn't mean at all to discredit you!  Sorry to hear of your crazy mean angelfish!  You taught me a lesson. - angelcraze2   For being a friendly memeber - mac   

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    2 Not allowed!
    Lots of good arguments here from both sides surprisingly. I am also a huge proponent of larger water changes. I have seen it in friends' (Discus Raisers) and my personal experience in the LFS setting. I am in charge of six 55gs and four 75gs. Each tank has different species of cichlids, catfish and goldfish. I do an 80% water change on each tank weekly. The easier to take care of tanks such as small african and small centrals do not require such a large water change. I do it just for the caution and the fact I believe this will help their health in the long run. The more overstocked tanks and tanks with dirtier species such as oscars, goldfish, and large africans are required to have such large water changes. These fish produce huge amounts of waste and dig them back up. There are often times large debris of waste floating in the water column and so it is easy to physically remove them with large water changes. I do not believe it is necessary for the home aquarium but when raising and keeping overstocked tanks, larger changes are a must.

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Jul 2008
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    Timaru NewZealand [south island]
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    3 Not allowed!
    This is a interesting discussion.

    For my discus I am yet to see nitrates on the test kit. And I only turn over around a 20% water change every week on the 83g. But in saying that the tank is ultra low stocked.
    While other tanks which are pretty crowded need tons of water changes to keep things going perfectly.
    I have though found in one of my heavily stocked tank's full of needle leaf hygro and java moss, can get held of a lot longer before nitrates start climbing up.

    As for the marine tanks, that isnt something I know to much about. But I do read a ton of confilicting information in the marine sector. Old schools vs new. Sumps vs other options for marine tanks ect. But for nitrate a well estabilsihed marine tank should cope with a gradual swing in nitrate. But it's not something you want to push for to long, other wise a crash in inevitable.

  8. #18

    Join Date
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    A guppy to get you started. - Slaphppy7   Have a beer for being another sports fan ;-) - steeler58   Here's a super rare guppy lol - AmazonJoe   

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    1 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by Rocksor View Post
    If you dont believe this guys argument on keeping nitrates (as nitrogen) below 20ppm, then you can follow up on the research links.

    http://www.oscarfish.com/article-hom...-toxicity.html

    Humic substances like tannins from wood, etc., can prevent uptake of nitrate. One of the reasons why closed systems in nature work.

    https://www.oscarfish.com/forum/gene...html?start=160
    Those were informative articles. I am not shocked the research cites a huge variance from species to species regarding nitrate tolerance. I will read more of the cited reference articles soon. Thanks for posting this.

  9. #19

    Join Date
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    This. Is. SPS!!! - BIO-Linist   Now for somebody to spam you with discus - BIO-Linist   Discus and Beer! - Sandz   Thank you my friend! - JudiJetson   Your &quot;light siesta&quot; suggestion a while back worked wonders last week. Thanks! - ~firefly~   

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    3 Not allowed!
    I don't think Marty was trying to advocate not keeping a low nitrate level but merely implying that marine animals can tolerate higher nitrate levels. I think we are all in the same page that the lower the nitrate, the better.
    Think with logic and rationality more than emotion. Act with moderation and consideration. Contemplate ideals and realistic goals and weigh out possibilities and options. Temper not with personal delusions or false hope but learn to accept and move on.


  10. #20

    Join Date
    Mar 2012
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    0 Not allowed!
    Wow, that's a lot of reading, gotta give it a break! I want to use peat and IALs to make tea. I use IALs in my tanks and I see tannins, but with all the large water changes I do, I'm worried I'm changing params too quickly if I add more than just a few. I also want to get into using other sources of HS, like alder cones and banana stems.

    I have a ton of maple trees and the fall season is approaching, I read maple and oak leaves will provide humic substance, but not the antibacterial properties IALs do. Does anyone know how beneficial maple leaves are compared to oak leaves? Should I even bother collecting leaves from my big Crimson King maple? Those leaves would look fabulous in an aquarium!

    If they are completely safe to use after they fall off the tree, I might as well, I'm just curious. I see ppl using oak leaves all the time, not so much maple leaves.....
    Last edited by angelcraze2; 10-12-2017 at 08:28 PM.
    GiVe Me sHrEd TiLL i'M dEaD
    -Kat

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