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Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1

    Join Date
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    Default Fishless Cycle Addendum: help for anyone confused as what to do next


    4 Not allowed!
    Please read this first:

    Sticky: The Fishless Cycle

    I have written this as a guide to go along with Lady Hobbs excellent write up. This does not replace her important thread on fishless cycling, and she has some very important points that are not repeated here.

    Keep in mind that this process is variable and someone may take 2 weeks-others 4. Don't be discouraged or try to rush a cycle, your fish's lives depend on it.

    STEP 1: To repeat Lady Hobbs, get a source of surfactant free ammonia, Ace hardware sells it and you can find it in other stores as well as online. You will also want to pick up some syringes to measure out the ammonia with-either buy them online or ask your local pharmacy if they can give you one or two.
    You should also have a Freshwater test kit that will allow you to test ammonia, nitrite and nitrate levels (and pH) in your tank-API makes a good kit. Don’t use the dipsticks-they are not accurate

    STEP 2: Your tank should be set up with running filter, a heater set to 82-83F and an air stone/pump to help your bacteria grow. It can be already planted and decorated-that will not impact your cycle. You should also have used a de-chlorinator/chloramine remover like Seachem Prime to your tank water. After this you do not do any water changes until the tank is fully cycled, not even to top off.

    STEP 3: Find the concentration of the Ammonia on the bottle and use this calculator to find out the dosage for your tank size:
    http://www.fishforums.net/aquarium-calculator.htm

    If you have a smaller tank you want to aim for 1-2 ppm, for larger tanks you can go 3-4 ppm. Remember if you dose too much ammonia you can stall or stop your cycle altogether.

    STEP 4: Dose the tank with the correct amount of ammonia and wait a couple days (3-4). On about the 3rd day test your water with the ammonia test kit. If you added 2 ppm of ammonia to your tank and you test your water and it is now .05 ppm, that means you have the nitrifying bacteria growing and breaking down the ammonia.

    Test the ammonia again the next day and if it is at 0, test the nitrItes. If you have no nitrItes, then add another full dose of ammonia to the tank and test again in another couple days. Once you start to test positive for nitrItes you move onto the next step.

    STEP 5: Once you test positive for nitrItes and your ammonia is at 0, you only add half a dose of ammonia to the tank every few days. SO if your initial dose of ammonia was 2 ml, you now add 1 ml ONLY when the ammonia in the tank tests out at 0 ppm. Now you will also be testing for nitrItes every other day or so depending on your levels.

    What do I mean? If your nitrite test come back purple, 5 ppm you don’t have to come back the next day and test it again. It will take a couple days for levels to go down so you can check a day or two after. IF your nitrIte levels are at .25 ppm you probably will want to check the next day. Once your nitrIte levels are 0 your cycle is complete.

    This can take 2-4 weeks to accomplish, it varies on the individual, so if yours takes longer don’t get discouraged.

    STEP 6: Finally, you can measure the nitrAte levels in the tank, don’t be alarmed if these are high. Now you can do a large water change in the tank…75%-80%. You won’t do any harm to you bacteria because it is in your filter. Just make sure you use the de-chlorinator/chloramine remover like Seachem Prime when you add the new water because those will harm your bacteria. You can also lower the temperature of your water to 76F-or whatever is best for your fish and remove the air stone/pump if you want to.

    You have enough bacteria to fully stock your tank, however be aware that this is still a new tank so some fish that need established tanks should not be added at this time (like corys, otos, plecos, neon tetras, rummynose tetras…it helps to do your research). You may want to wait 2-3 months at least to add them.

    Also even after adding your stock you will want to test for ammonia, nitrite and nitrate for the next few days-weeks just to ensure your bacteria can meet the bioload of your new stock (fish/shrimp/snails). Also test water parameters after you add new fish to your tanks, this may raise ammonia and nitrites which can be removed with a water change or two until your bacteria grow in size to keep up with your new additions.

    Oh and BTW-congratulations you have cycled your tank!
    Last edited by Boundava; 03-08-2017 at 03:35 PM.
    75g- Plecos, Rainbowfish, Edlers, Espei, Gouramis, Cory, Loaches, Amano, and misc.
    Two 5.5g- Shrimp tanks; one with 4 chili rasbora & Bloody Mary and second with Blue Dream shrimp
    5.5g- Rescue female betta Lucky Star
    20L- Rescue betta Tony Stark and pygmy corys
    20L- Pygmy cory, 2 vampire/rock shrimp, ember tetras and female guppies

    75g:
    Nat's 20L Tanks
    5.5 G Shrimp Tanks


    DebinWhitmore

  2. #2

    Join Date
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    Default


    1 Not allowed!
    Very nice write up, and some very good points within....thread stickied, congrats Boundava
    10 Gallon Beginner Tank... Journal
    40 Gallon Breeder: ... Journal
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    “If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went” - Will Rogers

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Apr 2015
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    Default


    1 Not allowed!
    So what if I only wanted to stock with neon tetras? Neons and black neons to be specific

  4. #4

    Join Date
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    Mr 46,000 - steeler58   For surviving Harvey - Silbar   Hope you're drying out down there. - WhistlingBadger   Thanks for the Rep! - Silbar   Thanks for the rep! - Silbar   
    Troop and Military Support - Amber Alert - Bladder Cancer - Endometriosis - Equality - Liver Cancer - Liver Disease - Missing Children - POW/MIA - Spina Bifida - Suicide - steeler58   Breast Cancer - Birth Parents - steeler58   Cancer - Epilepsy - Foster Care - Gynecological Cancer - Rett Syndrome - aquariumlover10   Cancer - Epilepsy - Foster Care - Gynecological Cancer - Rett Syndrome - gronlaura   Breast Cancer - Birth Parents - SeaLady   

    Default


    1 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by NoelFae View Post
    So what if I only wanted to stock with neon tetras? Neons and black neons to be specific
    Best to ask on your thread, where we have all of your details
    10 Gallon Beginner Tank... Journal
    40 Gallon Breeder: ... Journal
    29 Gallon: ... Journal

    “If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went” - Will Rogers

  5. #5

    Join Date
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    thank you for the moss - Hockey nut   For being a good sport ;-) - steeler58   No Message - BluewaterBoof   You deserve a medal for all of your hard work! - Silbar   Hang in there, you will get it all done! - RiversGirl   

    Default


    2 Not allowed!
    I never had luck with neons, so I went with cardinal tetras-they are hardier. Neons need a mature-established tank so add the black neons first-they are also very hardy, then maybe a month or so later the neons if parameters are stable (no ammonia, nitrites, low nitrates).

    Hard to nail down what a "mature-established" aquarium is, but I agree with this:

    https://tanninaquatics.com/blogs/new...uarium-anyways

    In my opinion, a “mature” aquarium is a system in which the nitrogen cycle is fully functioning, and nitrate is regularly produced as the “end product” of the biological filtration process. However, it goes further than that. I believe that truly “mature” systems have several distinct traits that set them apart from newly-cycled systems, specifically:

    *Significant populations of microfauna, algae, and plants are in the system, with very few anomalous “crashes” or fish deaths occurring. Ammonia and nitrite are undetectable in the aquarium. Stability exists in terms of animal populations and environmental fluctuations.

    *Microalgae is present in manageable quantities along with other macro life. Substrate is clean and not excessively filled with detritus.

    *Fish population has been stable, healthy and consistent, with few losses with any frequency.

    *Plants are actively growing and increasing in size as well as improving in health and color.

    What’s more, there is a certain “Something” to a mature aquarium…A smell, a look, a lack of excess in either “good” or “bad” animals. In my opinion, a “mature” tank is one in which you don’t have to freak out every time you miss a water change, forget to feed, fall behind on algae scraping, top-offs, etc. Aquariums that are environmentally stable allow the aquarist a certain degree of latitude in maintenance and overall husbandry. But that doesn’t mean you can kick back, of course.
    75g- Plecos, Rainbowfish, Edlers, Espei, Gouramis, Cory, Loaches, Amano, and misc.
    Two 5.5g- Shrimp tanks; one with 4 chili rasbora & Bloody Mary and second with Blue Dream shrimp
    5.5g- Rescue female betta Lucky Star
    20L- Rescue betta Tony Stark and pygmy corys
    20L- Pygmy cory, 2 vampire/rock shrimp, ember tetras and female guppies

    75g:
    Nat's 20L Tanks
    5.5 G Shrimp Tanks


    DebinWhitmore

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