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  1. #1

    Join Date
    Mar 2016
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    Default Footprint vs gallons for bigger fish


    0 Not allowed!
    Always wondered this and found no other threads. So they say the bigger tank the better. But they always seem to measure it in gallons. For example, a 125 gallon is usually 72 inches long but a 150 gallon might only be 45 inches long but much wider and taller. So in respect to triggerfish, how big of a tank length wise would i need?

  2. #2

    Join Date
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    0 Not allowed!
    It goes both ways. Bigger volume wise is always better to provide a better buffer to sudden changes in water chemistry, which in turn can effect fish and other living organisms in the tank. Bigger footprint wise is better for fish that like swimming, such as a triggerfish or tang. A 6 foot tank is typically considered the minimum length for most triggers and tangs, or other larger fish that like to swim, but longer is always better and with some species a keeper with the best intentions wouldn't put them in anything smaller than an 8 foot tank.

  3. #3

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    2 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by AABatteries View Post
    but longer is always better
    Provided you met the minimum requirements needed for height and depth. Sorry to be pedantic AA but i want to try to avoid confusion. I have seen some really weird footprints in my day. Such as 1ft by 1ft by 20 ft. Very long and narrow. Really only suitable for small schooling fish
    Do as I say. Not as I do.

  4. #4

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    0 Not allowed!
    Valid point. My girl friend's brother has a tank that's something like 8in x 8in x 36in.

  5. #5

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    1 Not allowed!
    The "bigger the better" typically refers to water stability with higher volumes of saltwater. Your levels are not going to fluctuate as qucikly. With respect to sizing, your vertical height is where you are going to maximize the fish potential. I believe 30" is your max for glass tanks. 4" is going to be your standard 120 and higher, unless you go for the 5ft profile.

    Typically what you'll hear, per the budget, go as big as the wall you're placing it can handle both vertical and horizontal. Glass tanks do not scratch. If you go acrylic, you do not want to go further than you can reach into, imo.

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