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Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Formerly MA, USA; Now Europe (Southern to be a little more precise)
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    5

    Default Male Albino Bristlenose Pleco Parenting Fail?


    0 Not allowed!
    I got a breeding trio of these (1 male; 2 females) form a retiring hobbyist and for about a year they refused to mate, or rather the male did; the females were full of eggs and the poor things carried those eggs about for 9 months! Anyhow, 3 months ago, I noticed one of the females looked like she hadn@t eaten for days the way her stomach was sunken and there were a couple of eggs lying about in the aquarium floor. I thought, "Finally! The females can swim easily now!" Well, the female that laid the eggs sure was anyways. Waited for about 2 weeks, but the male was acting odd- he was constantly about eating food, chasing the females away from the food. I finally decided to peek inside its cave and lo and behold, there were NO eggs, or fry for that matter. Nothing, zip, yada. Thought, "Ok perhaps the female is too old and is infertile/not producing eggs and that swollen-ness was gas

    3 nights ago, I saw the male cleaning a cave again with the other female. Didn't think much of it, the following morning eggs on the aquarium floor again. My attempts at trying to look into the cave showed a small batch of eggs. The following morning, more eggs out on the aquarium floor and at first I didn't think much since I had read the male kicks out bad or infertile eggs, until... the male swam out of the cave and sucked up the eggs! I had never heard of such a thing! I am not sure if he crushed them and sucked out the yolk, it happened so fast. It came out, sucked the eggs into its mouth then dashed back to the cave. I thought, "perhaps he was just trying to get back the eggs that were still viable back"/ The next morning, however, I saw the ENTIRE batch of eggs on the aquarium floor and the male was just going about business as usual, eating about, not a care in the world! Nice! To make matters worse, he comes to the eggs on occasion and sucks on them! I am quite sure now that he is eating them!

    I am trying to understand why my male is acting like this!?

    Has anyone had any experience like this or any thoughts on why this male pleco is acting like this?

    I am sorry my first first post on these forums is a rant. I had been a silent reader, trying to find out about this issue within other posts but couldn't find anything that matched what I am facing.

  2. #2

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    How big are the fish? If it is a younger male it could take a few attempts before he gets it right.
    Another thing is to ensure the cave is slanted inwards. A cave that slants towards its opening makes it easier for a clutch to fall out.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jun 2014
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    Formerly MA, USA; Now Europe (Southern to be a little more precise)
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    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by madagascariensis View Post
    How big are the fish? If it is a younger male it could take a few attempts before he gets it right.
    Another thing is to ensure the cave is slanted inwards. A cave that slants towards its opening makes it easier for a clutch to fall out.
    Well, the person who sold them to me had had 3 successful batches of fry raised from eggs and he told me the male did everything. Nothing like this. Also, even if the eggs fell out on their own, I can@t understand why the male kicks out the eggs, then eats them!

  4. #4

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    It happen, but this is very clumsy behaviour. Bit short on info though

    tank shot?
    what kind of cave and where?
    how warm is the tank?
    Which species of BN?
    how hard is your water?
    diet?

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Jun 2014
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    Formerly MA, USA; Now Europe (Southern to be a little more precise)
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    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by talldutchie View Post
    It happen, but this is very clumsy behaviour. Bit short on info though

    tank shot?
    what kind of cave and where?
    how warm is the tank?
    Which species of BN?
    how hard is your water?
    diet?
    Sorry if I was short on the info. Let me address the points you raised real quick.

    tank shot? Do you mean short? Its a 20 gal, square one.
    what kind of cave and where? cave is a commercial clay "bristlenose spawn cave" it is like a triangle but the edges are curved inward and not straight/ It is in the corner of the tank, the inside doesn't see much light.
    how warm is the tank? it is 28 degrees Celsius (about 82.5 F)
    Which species of BN? Its an albino bristlenose pleco. I think they are the albino of cf. cirrhosus in terms of species. Nothing special
    how hard is your water? Water is moderately hard and I soften it using mangrow roots.
    diet? I feed them algae wafers and the occasional flake food, iceberg lettuce, romaine lettuce (though they prefer iceberg), cucumbers, watermelon, and zucchini (when in season).

  6. #6

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I've had 5 breedings from my BNP's and for 2 of these the eggs were kicked out of the cave when the male became startled. I saved one clutch by netting them and putting them in a mesh breeder that hangs inside the tank. All of these eggs hatched into fry. The 2nd batch outside the cave I didn't save as I had too many fry and juveniles at that time. So if you find them outside the cave again, you can try to save them using a mesh breeder.

  7. #7

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by aquariumhobbyist View Post
    Sorry if I was short on the info. Let me address the points you raised real quick.

    tank shot? Do you mean short? Its a 20 gal, square one..
    No, I meant can we see it?
    .
    what kind of cave and where? cave is a commercial clay "bristlenose spawn cave" it is like a triangle but the edges are curved inward and not straight/ It is in the corner of the tank, the inside doesn't see much light..
    So it's basically a funnel shape? That's not good!
    .
    how warm is the tank? it is 28 degrees Celsius (about 82.5 F)
    Which species of BN? Its an albino bristlenose pleco. I think they are the albino of cf. cirrhosus in terms of species. Nothing special.
    That and the extremely high temp explains why it took so long for spawning to happen. What's in there that you keep it that hot?
    .
    how hard is your water? Water is moderately hard and I soften it using mangrow roots.
    diet? I feed them algae wafers and the occasional flake food, iceberg lettuce, romaine lettuce (though they prefer iceberg), cucumbers, watermelon, and zucchini (when in season).
    Possibly a bit low on protein then for the male.

    OK, I think the high temps are probably what caused them not to spawn. If the cave is indeed more or less a funnel shape it would explain why he's struggling to keep the eggs in.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Jun 2014
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    Formerly MA, USA; Now Europe (Southern to be a little more precise)
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    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    The high temperature would explain the time it took them to breed, yes though in the winter, the water was 24 degrees celsius (75F). It would not, however, explain why the male is eating the eggs, surely?

    The water is high because the weather is really hot and that's what I manage to cool it down to in the summer.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Jun 2014
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    Formerly MA, USA; Now Europe (Southern to be a little more precise)
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    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by SueD View Post
    I've had 5 breedings from my BNP's and for 2 of these the eggs were kicked out of the cave when the male became startled. I saved one clutch by netting them and putting them in a mesh breeder that hangs inside the tank. All of these eggs hatched into fry. The 2nd batch outside the cave I didn't save as I had too many fry and juveniles at that time. So if you find them outside the cave again, you can try to save them using a mesh breeder.
    What is a mesh breeder exactly? I do not know if I can find those easily.

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