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Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12
  1. Default aquarium salt vs. rock salt


    0 Not allowed!
    I was wondering if it would hurt the fish to use some ice cream rock salt instead of the regular aquarium salt if you run low. this is a fresh water tank

    thanks anyone

  2. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    You can use ice cream rock salt to treat for an ailment. Pickling salt works just as well. I have used rock salt (and know others as well) to treat ich.
    Last edited by Rocksor; 03-19-2014 at 06:13 PM.

  3. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    thanks much. I usually use the aquarium salt and I have noticed that it looks cleaner than the stuff I used on the ice cream.
    I just use it to have a calming effect on the little community. they usually get along great with that stuff added.

  4. #4

    Default


    1 Not allowed!
    OK... So.. you're using salt on fresh water fish to calm them down? That's quite far from a healthy setup for most freshwater fish. Most likely you're submitting them to regular osmotic shock and reducing their lifespan significantly.

  5. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    you might be right but I've been using salt in my fresh water aquarium setup since 1968 and all my fish seem to live very long happy lives.
    I use 4tsp. salt in the 125 gal. tank.

  6. Default


    2 Not allowed!
    Here is a very good, detailed and simple to read article on the use of salt in freshwater aquariums: http://www.practicalfishkeeping.co.u...t.php?sid=2850

    Although the use of salt can be beneficial for treating illness or reduce stress during transport, it shouldn't be used as part of a permanent routine.
    • 20 gallon: Posh shrimp tank:2 panda taiwan bee shrimp, 14 F1 hybrid bee shrimps and 30 taitibee
    • 15 gallon:High tech planted tank with 7 forktail rainbow fish, 4 horned nerite snails and red cherry shrimp

  7. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    thanks, that is quite an article.
    the mollys I have need some saline. I never had any luck in plain fresh water with that breed. doing the math on my 125 gal at 4tsp per tank comes in at .038ppt which is far below what it would take to harm any of the other types.
    I wonder what the chemical makup is in those tropical streams that they actually are supposed to live in. they are a constant wash with minerals of all kinds and salt is very common on this planet.

  8. #8

    Default


    1 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by lottabubbles View Post
    you might be right but I've been using salt in my fresh water aquarium setup since 1968 and all my fish seem to live very long happy lives.
    I use 4tsp. salt in the 125 gal. tank.
    Well.. things have moved on. I just got some early 1970s books and they also advocate salt especially early in the startup to deal with nitrite. These days we know a lot more.

    Salt makes sense for some species like your mollies. It's also a good idea if you're in very soft water or if you're keeping species that like their water very hard and stable.

    On the other hand. About 99.5% of all species we keep that come from south America or south-east Asia do not need salt and may actually be hurt by it. These come from streams with extremely low mineral content and a very low Ph.

    I've got nothing against an informed and concious use of salt but I do feel obliged to speak out against using salt as an automatic action. PErhaps I spoke out of turn against you, perhaps not. No insult was intended just some information for anyone interested.

  9. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    no offense taken, nothing bothers me, mainly because heart attacks run in the family and I refuse to be bothered by anything.

    the thing I did glean from the article is that I should be using marine salt instead of the stuff I am using now.

    I have 7 large male mollys in that thank and they are all 4 yrs old now. the only newer species I've introduced are the genetically modified danios in green, pink, and gold color. most of them are 1.5 yrs. and grow quick and seem look very healthy. my common pleco seems very happy also and is up to his task every day.

    my temperature in my tank vary at all. I used to do electronics for a living and back in 92 I built my own sensor regulated heater control unit. this probably keeps stress to a minimum.

  10. #10

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    With mollies marine salt is a good option. I'm not very familiar with those danios, they are illegal in Europe, but from what I know it's basically a zebra danio and those are pretty flexible in the way they handle mineral content.

    The common pleco is an unknown. Their natural waters are rather soft but I've also seen them do well in rift lake tanks with liquid rock. If there's any adverse effects on them it's likely to take a long time to show up.

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