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Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. Default I made a stupid movement, any suggestions?


    0 Not allowed!
    Hi everyone, this is my first post...
    I just started to cycle my 20 gallon water tank. After I dump a spoon amount of ammonia, I found the NH3 level spike to 8 ppm. I am completely shocked and don't know what to do next.
    Looks like I have 2 options,
    1. Replace the 20 gallon water (this probably is the worst scenario.)
    2. Just wait till the ammonia level drop below 2ppm.

    Is there suggestions on my next movement? Thanks.

    P.S. : I did learn a lot from the post. I am really happy to have such a place to learn these knowledge.

  2. #2

    Default


    1 Not allowed!
    Doing a 50% water change seems the most obvious solution

  3. #3

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Is this a marine aquarium ? Either way, replace the water as 8ppm is way to high for either FW or SW.

    If this is a marine aquarium, what do you have for live/dry rock ?
    If you take your time to do the research FIRST, you can successfully set-up and keep ANY type of aquarium with ease.
    "Not using a quarantine tank is like playing Russian roulette. Nobody wins the game, some people just get to play longer than others." - Anthony Calfo
    Fishless Cycle Cycling with Fish Marine Aquarium Info [URL="http://saltwater.aquaticcommunity.com/"]

  4. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I'll do it. Thanks

  5. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by Cliff View Post
    Is this a marine aquarium ? Either way, replace the water as 8ppm is way to high for either FW or SW.

    If this is a marine aquarium, what do you have for live/dry rock ?
    This is a marine aquarium. I have dry rocks. I don't quite get what do you mean by what I have for dry rocks...

  6. #6

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    How much dry rock do you have ?

    If you are cycling with dry (or dead) rock then you certainly do not want very high levels of ammonia at all as your rock will act like a sponge, soaking up and trapping ammonia inside and releasing it later on. Assuming all your rock is dead / dry, I would suggest a 100% water change followed by re-curing your dry rock for a few weeks before you start to cycle you tank again.

    The below two links can help with that
    ~
    http://www.reefaquarium.com/2012/cyc...rine-aquarium/

    http://www.reefaquarium.com/2013/cur...ine-aquariums/
    If you take your time to do the research FIRST, you can successfully set-up and keep ANY type of aquarium with ease.
    "Not using a quarantine tank is like playing Russian roulette. Nobody wins the game, some people just get to play longer than others." - Anthony Calfo
    Fishless Cycle Cycling with Fish Marine Aquarium Info [URL="http://saltwater.aquaticcommunity.com/"]

  7. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by Cliff View Post
    How much dry rock do you have ?

    If you are cycling with dry (or dead) rock then you certainly do not want very high levels of ammonia at all as your rock will act like a sponge, soaking up and trapping ammonia inside and releasing it later on. Assuming all your rock is dead / dry, I would suggest a 100% water change followed by re-curing your dry rock for a few weeks before you start to cycle you tank again.

    The below two links can help with that
    ~
    http://www.reefaquarium.com/2012/cyc...rine-aquarium/

    http://www.reefaquarium.com/2013/cur...ine-aquariums/
    They are all dry rocks. Thanks for your suggestion. I'll do a 100% water change and recuring the dry rocks. Hopefully, I can make it work next time

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