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Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. Default Seen any long term reef aquaria?


    0 Not allowed!
    Do you guys know of any reef aquariums that have been maintained long enough to allow coral to 'grow' a natural reef? That would be very cool, but I would think extremely difficult, considering the length of time it would take. Can coral even breed in a tank environment?

  2. #2

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I’m not too sure what exactly you are asking here. I have a reef tank that has been set up and running for a few years now (plus a up-grade in-between) and all the corals are growing without any problems. A friend of mine has a reef tank that has been set-up for well over 10 years without issue, his corals have been growing to the point that he has to flag them once every year or two so his tank will not become over grown. That is actually very common.

    IMO, Reef tanks are not any more difficult than a heavy planted fresh water tank.
    If you take your time to do the research FIRST, you can successfully set-up and keep ANY type of aquarium with ease.
    "Not using a quarantine tank is like playing Russian roulette. Nobody wins the game, some people just get to play longer than others." - Anthony Calfo
    Fishless Cycle Cycling with Fish Marine Aquarium Info [URL="http://saltwater.aquaticcommunity.com/"]

  3. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I was mistaken. I know in the wild it takes decades for damaged areas of coral to recover. But I did not know different coral grows at different rates, or that they breed in different ways. I can see now one can certainly 'grow' a reef in an aquarium.

  4. Default


    1 Not allowed!
    Yeah, just like any calcium carbonate secreting organism, the "shell" grows alongside the actual organism. In a reef tank each coral would grow independently at their own rates, but most likely wouldn't propagate into new corals as that would be very difficult in an aquarium environment.

  5. #5

    Default


    1 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by fishguy125 View Post
    Yeah, just like any calcium carbonate secreting organism, the "shell" grows alongside the actual organism. In a reef tank each coral would grow independently at their own rates, but most likely wouldn't propagate into new corals as that would be very difficult in an aquarium environment.
    I would disagree with the above. Coral propagation will happen all the time with most corals. I have many different clove polyps, mushrooms, zoes and different types of SPS (mostly arcos and encrusting SPS) that have grown and reproduced. I would think the only type of corals that would be harder to reproduce in a aquarium would be some types of LPS corals (like brain corals) that need to reproduce sexually. You really would need a set-up specifically designed for that purpose if you would want to breed LPS corals.

    Also, corals do not have a shell that grows along side of the organism, nor do the secret calcium. SPS ans LPS corale will use calcium (and other elements in the water) to grow their internal skeleton structures

    It's a lot easier than you would think. I find it easier to grow corals than I do fresh water plants
    If you take your time to do the research FIRST, you can successfully set-up and keep ANY type of aquarium with ease.
    "Not using a quarantine tank is like playing Russian roulette. Nobody wins the game, some people just get to play longer than others." - Anthony Calfo
    Fishless Cycle Cycling with Fish Marine Aquarium Info [URL="http://saltwater.aquaticcommunity.com/"]

  6. Default


    1 Not allowed!
    Haha once corals are in the right light and water they do tend to breed and spread easily. Common misconception that it's hard for them to reproduce in aquarium. My corals always seemed to grow faster than plants or just as fast.
    Stuck w/ 2 many Hobbies...

  7. #7

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by darsunt View Post
    I was mistaken. I know in the wild it takes decades for damaged areas of coral to recover. But I did not know different coral grows at different rates, or that they breed in different ways. I can see now one can certainly 'grow' a reef in an aquarium.
    That isnt really true either but it is a truth that has been fed to the public due to ignorance, to get grant money or some other reason. The truth is that all though it takes a long time for a reef to first form they can recover in less than a decade if conditions improve. see http://news.ufl.edu/2013/12/17/coral-reefs-2/ as an example of this.
    Do as I say. Not as I do.

  8. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    ^yup this is very true. They exaggerated a lot just for grant money lol
    Stuck w/ 2 many Hobbies...

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