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Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. Default Stung by a Panda Corydora?


    0 Not allowed!
    Hi
    I was emptying my 30g tank so i could change my substrate from gravel to sand.
    The last fish to catch was a tiny panda corydora. I was having trouble catching it and at one point simply put one hand down to gently cup it into the net fully (it was partially in the net)
    As i touched it i felt a strong zing of pain fire up one finger. I put the panda corydora in the bucket with the others and examined the net thinking there was something pointy and sharp in it. There was nothing!
    So do Panda Corydoras sting? And if so, what should i expect as symptoms? Is it venom? Do i need to get it seen to by a GP?

    Thanks for your time.
    Who Rescued Who?

    Don't shop; Adopt!
    --FISH ARE FRIENDS NOT FOOD--

  2. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Corydoras, like most catfish, have very sharp, bony, pointy fins. You just were at the wrong place at the wrong time and happened to catch your finger on a fin. This is also why it is better to, if you can, catch the cories with a container such as a tupperware, because their fins easily catch on the mesh netting and possibly damage. I for one have never been able to catch a cory in a tupperware, but it is better for them.
    Tanks: 30 gal community and 10 gal shrimp/community
    Journals Here

  3. #3

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Cories do indeed sting and there is some species that also secrete a toxin. Wether the toxin is delivered by the sharp end of the pectoral or it enters your body by being in the water when you get stung is still a bit unclear to me.

    Anyway, if you have can still read this answer you're not terribly allergic and it's now too late to use the heat treatment on the sting. Keep an eye out for signs of infection in which case you do want medical attention, otherwise it should pass in 3-4 days.

    Some reading: http://www.biologie.hhu.de/fileadmin..._5_111-115.pdf

  4. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Agree with Talldutchie, but isn't the article about the "cases" of selfpoissoning TD? Or is it the same poisson used for stinging like a wasp. Cheers Aad
    No Cory, No Glory !!

  5. #5

    Join Date
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    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    DoubleDutch, maybe you should read this part again, specifically the parts I put in bold.

    Corydoras spp. under stress, e.g. during
    transport or after catching in the wild or
    in the aquarium, obviously discharge substances
    that are harmful to conspecifics
    and other fishes;
    this was repeatedly described
    by aquarists and tradesmen (e.g.
    Evers 2002, Schäfer 2003). In addition,
    severe pain is reported by people when
    injured by pectoral spines of Corydoras spp.

    Generally, in Siluriformes toxic secretions
    arise (1) from unicellular glands in the epidermis
    called club cells (see Whitear and Mittal 1983; unpublished observations), (2)
    from gland cell aggregations surrounding
    the first pectoral fin ray and/or (3) from
    axillary glands that occur in some taxa.
    Toxic properties of the epidermal glands
    of catfish have been thoroughly studied,
    but information of axillary glands is poor
    (for review see Perrière and Goudey-Perri
    ére 2003).

    I have read this about corys before, and it is my understanding that they are not intentionally poisoning themselves. In the wild they release the toxin to stun other fish which gives them a chance to escape. But, in the transport bags and in our aquariums there is no room for escape so they end up accidentally poisoning themselves. At least that is how I understood it.
    Last edited by mommy1; 11-28-2013 at 01:36 PM.
    When I go fishing I just place a sharp rock in the water and sit there waiting for all the dead fish to float to the top... Kingfisher
    Brutal honesty will be shown on this screen.
    I think my fish is adjusting well to the four gallon, He's laying on his side attempting to go to sleep on the bottom of the gravel.
    Tolerance is a great thing to have, so is the ability to shut up.

    I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.


  6. #6

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Thing is, that secreting of poison into the water is somewhat understood now and the article I quoted explains what that secretion actually is. When I posted it I wasn't aware of any scientific look into what makes the sting itself painful

  7. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Hello
    Thanks everyone for the information. The poor little guy was definitely stressed.
    I am able to type so i'm definitely fine. So are the fish.
    Who Rescued Who?

    Don't shop; Adopt!
    --FISH ARE FRIENDS NOT FOOD--

  8. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by mommy1 View Post
    DoubleDutch, maybe you should read this part again, specifically the parts I put in bold.

    Corydoras spp. under stress, e.g. during
    transport or after catching in the wild or
    in the aquarium, obviously discharge substances
    that are harmful to conspecifics
    and other fishes;
    this was repeatedly described
    by aquarists and tradesmen (e.g.
    Evers 2002, Schäfer 2003). In addition,
    severe pain is reported by people when
    injured by pectoral spines of Corydoras spp.

    Generally, in Siluriformes toxic secretions
    arise (1) from unicellular glands in the epidermis
    called club cells (see Whitear and Mittal 1983; unpublished observations), (2)
    from gland cell aggregations surrounding
    the first pectoral fin ray and/or (3) from
    axillary glands that occur in some taxa.
    Toxic properties of the epidermal glands
    of catfish have been thoroughly studied,
    but information of axillary glands is poor
    (for review see Perrière and Goudey-Perri
    ére 2003).

    I have read this about corys before, and it is my understanding that they are not intentionally poisoning themselves. In the wild they release the toxin to stun other fish which gives them a chance to escape. But, in the transport bags and in our aquariums there is no room for escape so they end up accidentally poisoning themselves. At least that is how I understood it.
    Thanks mommy1. Didn't seem to be very awake this morning !!! Cheers Aad
    No Cory, No Glory !!

  9. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    My dad got stung by what I suspect was a mad-tom catfish, and he had to go to the hospital to get checked out. The pond was filthy and so were the catfish... The funny thing is, at the time he was showing me how to avoid the fish's spines!
    I've been pricked a few times by cories, although I haven't been truly stung, I don't think, at least not by a big one. There was this one time with a pygmy cory, a tiny one, that made my hand hurt for a couple of days... I'd agree with the fact that you really need to move them in a container.
    I hate hearing people say "it's only a $3/$5/$1 fish/shrimp, so it's ok if it dies, I can just get another." It's still an animal! All animals should be treated like they're worth $10,000.
    29 sw: Damsel, shrimpgoby, pistol shrimp, waspfish
    65 fw: Rummies, glowlight tetras, pencilfish, darters, ottos, f betta, goby, dwarf gourami, ninjas
    29 fw: Chili rasboras, pygmy cories, P. Gertrudae

  10. #10

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Goodness me....time for me to give up on my Corys and switch to Guppies!

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