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Results 1 to 10 of 23
  1. Default New 35 Gallon Hex for a Beginner


    0 Not allowed!
    Hey guys,

    I am very new to the forum, and to fish for that matter, but I was pretty excited today when I picked up my 35 gallon hex tank and stand. My Dad has a 60 gallon hex and he loves it and has thriving plants and fish. My plan is to make it a planted tank, but I wanted to stick with LED lighting. I won't be doing goldfish, but I am up for any other advice on fish for this size tank. I would also like to hear advice about substrate, filters, and the best lighting for the plants. Thanks in advance!

  2. Default


    2 Not allowed!
    There is so much to consider. For starters, can you discover the hardness and pH of your tap water? This will help guide you to chose fish and plants that will do well in water that is readily available to you. Most municipal water supplies release a water quality report which can be found online.

    How much are you looking to spend on setting this up? Equipment choice will largely be budget dependent.

    What are the dimensions of the tank? When considering appropriate fish this is as important as (if not more important than) volume. For starters, let's forget all about the inch per gallon rule.

    Are you familiar with cycling? There are two good options: fishless cycling, and cycling with fish and many plants (more than just a few). You can read about fishless cycling in our cycling forum. Cycling with fish is really only valid as a plan B when the bacterial colonies are disrupted, or when someone buys fish before learning about the nitrification cycle.

    Some good advice is that nothing ever happens fast in an aquarium. There is can definitely be a sense of urgency and excitement with a new aquarium, but if you slow down and take your time in the beginning, the end result will be much more rewarding.

  3. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    The hex is 20" across and 23" deep. Tap water pH is 7.5. As far as budget, it is worth noting that wife is hard to release money for hobbies.

  4. #4

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    The advice you've been given above is good. Learn all you can, be patient, watchful and diligent. I would add just a couple more things:

    Keep an eye out for leaks. These taller, odd-shaped tanks used to be prone to leaking more than the typical rectangular ones. I had a 30-gallon hex that leaked several times, even after being repaired, and I finally had to scrap it. On the other hand, yours might hold up perfectly. The one I had was back in the 80s, and they do a much better job, today, at sealing aquariums of all types. Just be vigilant, but don't worry too much about it.

    The other thing is that fish in a hex usually have more vertical space to move around in than horizontal space. There are some species that stay more flattened horizontally, and become vertically elongated. Angelfish are among these. I would advise keeping fish that are suitable for the shape and dimensions of your tank. Anything that grows very long horizontally might find their environment cramped.

    A shorter but wider hex versus a taller and narrower hex could compensate for this.

    Best of success to you. Take your time, and through careful selecting you should do fine.
    20 gal. high: planted; 8 white cloud minnows, 10 RCS, 2 blue shrimp, several snails; AC50, Azoo air. 65 gal: planted; 7 rosy barbs, 6 glofish,, 2 zebra danios, 6 rosy red (fathead) minnows, 3 dojo loaches, several snails; AC110 x 2.

  5. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Do you have an idea if you have hard or soft water? At 23" deep, it is worth noting that you'll probably need to limit substrate level plants to "low" light requirements. TBH, especially for beginners, low to medium light plants are best anyway.

    For lighting you can either do florescent or LED. Upfront LEDs can be a little more expensive, but in the long run they can save money. It is also worth considering that light will not be well dispersed across the entire tank front to back, unless you use multiple fixtures. This may be especially true of an LED, which doesn't "throw" as much light. That said, the Marineland Double Bright fixture may suite your needs. It is also crucial to avoid over lighting, as intense lighting drives up the nutrient needs of the system and makes it much less forgiving to balance.

    Filtration, you can either do a HOB or a canister. The canister will cost a little more, but are generally considered to be superior. For a HOB, many people here recommend the AquaClear line of filters. I have personally had good experience with one of their models, but I haven't used one in several years. When purchasing a HOB filter, you want it to be rated for double the volume in your tank. A quality canister filter rated for your volume or a little more is probably sufficient.

    Before committing too much to any of these options, I'd recommend first deciding upon fish. Some fish, like anabantoids, thrive with dense planting, lower light, and lower flow, while other species like a rapid current. Do you have any ideas of what you'd like? Some common species to avoid would be the Chinese/Siamese algae eaters, plecostomus (some of the dwarf species may be appropriate, but I'll defer to the advice of more experienced posters). Many cichlids are not community fish and require quite a bit of special attention, but some of the South American species can be an exception (though they still require careful attention to tank mates and tank layout) such as angels, rams or apistograma.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Aug 2012
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    Cool


    0 Not allowed!
    Image - Welcome wave.gif to the AC! You've come to the right place.

    I agree with the previous posts - find out what your tap water parameters are and then select fish will work with your water and tank size. Then you can research equipment needed for those species.
    My 75 gal Journal & My Dual 29 gal Journal
    My 75 gal - Gold Pristella Tetras, Scissortail Rasboras, Neon Dwarf Rainbowfish, Leopard & Zebra Danios, Bristlenose Pleco
    My Dual 29 gals - Left Tank - Diamond Tetras. Right Tank - Amano Shrimp

    "Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass....it's about learning to dance in the rain"

  7. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by gronlaura View Post
    Image - Welcome wave.gif to the AC! You've come to the right place.

    I agree with the previous posts - find out what your tap water parameters are and then select fish will work with your water and tank size. Then you can research equipment needed for those species.
    My pH is 7.5. When the house was purchased, we had a very in depth test performed on the water and it was considered close to perfect. I am current degassing a vial to check on CO2.

  8. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I'm still curious about general hardness and carbonate hardness. Perfect for drinking and perfect for fish are two different things. Your pH gives you a lot of flexibility, but hardness will still greatly inform your stocking choices.

  9. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by Zerileous View Post
    I'm still curious about general hardness and carbonate hardness. Perfect for drinking and perfect for fish are two different things. Your pH gives you a lot of flexibility, but hardness will still greatly inform your stocking choices.
    What is a good way to check this?

  10. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Are you on a municipal water supply? If so their website should contain a water quality report.

    You can also purchase an API test for about 5 bucks on amazon, or find less accurate tests at a hardware/home store.

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