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  1. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I see
    yea I use the same bulbs for my carnivorous plants, I think 6500k is the closest to true sunlight you can get from a bulb, people use it for almost all small plants :P

    hmmm, well the sand is already in there, should I remove it or???
    alsoit doesnt seem thatttt unnatural, there are several creeks with white sand around here, and some that are black and white mix, I think because the sand was probably made from granite .. ik of a few white beaches as well ... Im sure this isn't the only place in the world with white sand you know? and the creeks aren't fish free thats forsure

  2. #12

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by Ras View Post
    I see
    yea I use the same bulbs for my carnivorous plants, I think 6500k is the closest to true sunlight you can get from a bulb, people use it for almost all small plants :P

    hmmm, well the sand is already in there, should I remove it or???
    alsoit doesnt seem thatttt unnatural, there are several creeks with white sand around here, and some that are black and white mix, I think because the sand was probably made from granite .. ik of a few white beaches as well ... Im sure this isn't the only place in the world with white sand you know? and the creeks aren't fish free thats forsure
    I was thinking tropical freshwater fish, and to my knowledge there are no white sands in their habitats. Is it white, or off white? We may be thinking differently about "white."

    Fish over a pure white substrate will usually be "washed out" in colouration. Stanley Weitzman wrote about this some years ago, and explained how the fish cells react to light-tone substrates to cause this. Same thing happens with too bright lighting, or when under stress. I know I have seen some of my fish change colouration when moved to other tanks with a darker or lighter substrate, and I mean it changed permanently long-term. When my panda corys were over a basically black gravel they were very dark, and now over the Quikrete playsand they have coloured a bit lighter tan, close to the sand. This is the fish's attempt to blend into the substrate to avoid predation from above.

    One can help darken the substrate by lots of wood, plants, dry leaves, rock pebbles.

  3. #13

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by Sandz View Post
    Dutchie - im speaking of land fert products like miracle grow and true DIRT tanks... i even gave flourite and eco-complete as options. I said nothing of not using brands for the aquarium like tetra.
    Then I misunderstood and apologies are in order. Sorry!

  4. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    ohhhhhh that make sense, so correct me if Im getting this wrong but it just makes the fish more pale rather than it being actually harmful?
    In any case I will darken it by mixing in some brown sand or something, I want my fish to be colorful. I just had white cuz I thought the Idea of white sand, and granite rocks would look nice. Maybe by mixing in some brown I can still have a lighter sand w.o it being too white
    cuz it is pretty crisp white, here is a pic

  5. #15

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    That does look white. I would change it, if this were my tank. Play sand is very inexpensive, a single bag for a couple dollars is all you will need. It is some work to do, though; over the past two years I have changed out the substrates in all my 6 tanks, to Quikrete Play Sand, and each tank was a day's work; the 115g ran over two days.

    The "paling" of fish colouration is a sign that the fish is trying to compensate, and this can cause stress. So it is not that the sand itself is harmful, but the fish is reacting to it. What fish do you have?

  6. #16

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Lighter white sand isn't harmful in any way, but it will typically result in some faded colors. I respectfully disagree with Byron in this case. I don't believe the lightening of color is a conscious stress response any more than a darkening in this particular circumstance. It's just a natural, evolutionarily adaptive, shift in pigments.
    I actually prefer black sand - I just can't afford it in all my tanks! What you have looks like what I have in my 125g.
    Last edited by DKRST; 10-30-2013 at 10:05 PM.

  7. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    thanks for the info guys
    i have ember tetras and a gold ram, britlenose pleco which i was told can be in both soft and hard though Idk for sure, and I was hoping to get one or two cory catfish if they can handle soft water

  8. #18

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    One or two cories cannot handle soft water, half a dozen will love it. Most if not all south american species come from soft water.

    Bristlenose are an excellent example for adapting colour. Even my big daddy BN does it and he's convinced he owns the bottom of the tank and stresses about nothing. Still, he's paler when he's at the front of my tank where it's light and pale.

    Embers and rams love quite a bit of cover to swim between. Can be plants, can be wood even. Rams tend to appreciate leaf litter on the bottom of the tank. Both will also appreciate somewhat dimmer lighting so keeping about 20% of the tank covered in amazon frogbit is an idea.

  9. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by talldutchie View Post
    One or two cories cannot handle soft water, half a dozen will love it. Most if not all south american species come from soft water.

    Bristlenose are an excellent example for adapting colour. Even my big daddy BN does it and he's convinced he owns the bottom of the tank and stresses about nothing. Still, he's paler when he's at the front of my tank where it's light and pale.

    Embers and rams love quite a bit of cover to swim between. Can be plants, can be wood even. Rams tend to appreciate leaf litter on the bottom of the tank. Both will also appreciate somewhat dimmer lighting so keeping about 20% of the tank covered in amazon frogbit is an idea.
    damn that frogbit idea is great, I was worried about my lighting being too much for the fish but too little for the plants
    red root floaters might work too?

    also I was wondering if you guys think mixing this color of sand with my white sand will give them a more normal color, cuz I don't want to remove the sand all together.

  10. #20

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Never seen a red root floater so I don't know.

    You could add some of that sand, do wash it though. Spread over the top and let nature do the mixing.

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