Aquarium Forum
 


Menu
  · Tropical Fish Home
· Fish News
· Aquarium Forum
· Buy & Sell
· Calculators
· Equipment reviews
· Free Aquarium Ebook
· Feedback
· Link to us
· Photo gallery
· Plant species
· Tropica Plant DB
Tropical fish species
· By Common name
· By Scientific name
Tropical Marine fish
· By Common name
· By Scientific name

_________________
 
      
        Via paypal

  AC news is a part of
      Nature Blog Network

      Reef Aquarium Blog

Privacy & Ad Policy

Articles
  · African Cichlids
· Algae Control
· Aquarium Decoration
· Aquarium Resources
· Aquatic Plants
· Barb Fish
· Betta Fish
· Breeding Fish
· Catfish
· Central American Cichlids
· Cichlids
· Clownfish
· Corals
· Corydoras Catfish
· Discus Fish
· Dwarf Cichlids
· Fish Diseases
· Frogs and Turtles
· Goby Fish
· Goldfish
· Gourami
· Invertebrates
· Jellyfish
· Killiefish
· Lake Victoria Cichlids
· Livebearers
· Malawi Cichlids
· Marine Aquariums
· Marine Aquarium Fish
· Other Fish
· Pleco
· Predatory Fish
· Photography
· Pond Fish
· Responsible Fish Keeping
· Rainbow Fish
· Shark Fish
· South American Cichlids
· Tanganyika Cichlids
· Tetra Fish
· Tropical Fish Food
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17
  1. Question Dying for live plants in tall 38 gallon


    0 Not allowed!
    I keep getting told no on live plants on my tall, 38 gallon Marineland aquarium. Of course, Sunday, I went into the store and saw a beautifully planted tall aquarium.

    I am getting supplies together to restart my 38 gallon after being in storage from a move. I was having some issues with my lighting even after replacing the starter and the bulb, so I am going to end up purchasing another light source.

    I am currently reading about the easier plants to have and their requirements and trying to re-educate myself on aquatic plants.

    I guess what I am asking is...

    Does anyone have a tall, planted aquarium that can offer some advice. Even if someone does not have one and can offer assistance, it would be greatly appreciated.

    I have attached an pic of my aquarium when it was up before the move.

    Thanks all!
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I have a panted tank that has around 20 inches of water from substrate to surface. several plant species easily bridge that gap, such as my echinodorus bleheri, aponogeton madagascariensis, cryptocoryne balansae and
    rotala rotundifolia.

  3. #3

    Default


    1 Not allowed!
    My two largest tanks are 2 feet in depth, and I have no plant problems with moderate light. Some "carpet" plants won't make it in this, but it is possible to have a thriving planted tank.

    Do you have a light selected? This is the main issue to work out. There are many lovely low and moderate light plants we can go into when we know the lighting. Or we can consider possible types of lighting if you haven't decided. Ending up with too bright lighting is just as bad as too little, and with the popularity of T5 lighting it is easy to have too much.

    Byron.
    Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
    Vancouver, BC, Canada

    Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]

  4. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Thank you for the recommendations. I will definitely check them out. I have been looking at the low light plants in the sticky as well.

    I do not have a light selected yet. I took a stroll at the store and just looked at what they were using. I like the look of the LEDs, but wonder about the light output. I am starting research on what the best type of lighting would be. I had my previous fluorescent on a timer so that it would come on in the afternoon and shut off before I went to bed. I like the ones that have a timer already built in, just as a feature. Of course, I want to get the best possible, that is also energy efficient.

  5. #5

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    My first response is "what a load of baloney" regarding those who told you no live plants. Your tank is not that deep.
    As Byron said, with the proper lights such as T5HO's, you can easily drive the PAR high enough to grow plants at the substrate. I don't know if you'll get enough "power" with the plant spectrum LEDs to penetrate your tank to the substrate, but I'm not an LED expert at all.

    The overall plant issue is the drop off in PAR (photosynthetically active radiation) from the surface to the substrate (radiation declines as a square function of the distance from the source). Ignoring the fish issue momentarily, this means you can absolutely get the light intensity high enough so it grow plants at the substrate. Unfortunately, parts of the plants that grow upwards toward the light could end up covered in a mass of BBA algae due to the increasing intensity as you move up in the water column!

    The fish problem is the blinding amount of light you'd need to grow high-light plants at the substrate, so no high-light plants!

    I'd wager you can get appropriate light levels to grow swords and crypts without an issue, anubias for certain (some get nice and large, like A. gigantea and A. hastifolia) and even some stems may grow adequately if supplemented with modest CO2, should you decide you want to try pressurized CO2 (NOT a necessity).

    Instead of thinking of rooted plants growing to the surface, you may want a mix of floaters with substantial roots for vertical interest (water lettuce?) and larger substrate plants like swords. There are various ways you can "corral" floating plants across a portion of the tank surface to give you multiple design options. Use a large piece or two of driftwood, oriented vertically to grow a "log" full of anubias (again, careful as you approach the surface and the light increases, you'll get algae on that end of the wood). You can even drill out large wells in driftwood and recess small plastic pots of aquarium gravel/sand to grow higher-light plants along the driftwood. That arrangement allows you to locate plants closer to your light source - Lots of options!

  6. #6

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    David has several ideas. We don't know the intended fish, and that might suggest something. Some fish suite certain plants/aquascapes better than others. Another thought is the present light fixture, presumably built into the hood. What length of tubes does it take, and how many? I assume it is T8 not T5.

    Byron.
    Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
    Vancouver, BC, Canada

    Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]

  7. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Great information everyone! Thanks for all the post. I am getting really excited now.

    I have a 10 gallon hospital tank that I am getting out of storage this weekend and I will most likely put it up somewhere in the house and plant it with a few schools of smaller fish.

    I don't have a definite list yet of fish, but I am working on it. I am looking at color choices right now and trying to pick some of the most colorful ones and make sure everyone will coexist together. They will all be community fish with maybe a Chinese algae eater.

    My current hood is not built into the canopy, but just sits on top. It's a cheap, general purpose using T8 bulbs. It is definitely getting replaced.

  8. #8

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by TxRoper View Post
    Great information everyone! Thanks for all the post. I am getting really excited now.

    I have a 10 gallon hospital tank that I am getting out of storage this weekend and I will most likely put it up somewhere in the house and plant it with a few schools of smaller fish.

    I don't have a definite list yet of fish, but I am working on it. I am looking at color choices right now and trying to pick some of the most colorful ones and make sure everyone will coexist together. They will all be community fish with maybe a Chinese algae eater.

    My current hood is not built into the canopy, but just sits on top. It's a cheap, general purpose using T8 bulbs. It is definitely getting replaced.
    On the 10g, you would be well advised to keep that as a QT for new fish. Given the issues these days with disease, as witnessed by a couple ongoing threads, quarantining new fish for 4-5 weeks is a very wise precaution.

    To the light, OK. I also know nothing about LED, other than to say you could get a good LED fixture if you know what you need and are getting. Which means advice from members experienced with LED. The only LED I know of is the Marineland Double Bright, and I intend to get this myself for my 33g, but I cannot say it would be sufficient for your setup.

    A two-tube T8 fixture will work, if you can find one. Another member was looking a few weeks back, and to my surprise none of the major online retailers like Fosters&Smith are carrying these any longer. But locally you might find them. Get one that will take the longest tubes that will fit over your tank. For example, over a 3-foot tank get a fixture for 30-inch or 36-inch tubes.

    Another option is a single tube T5 fixture using an HO tube. I would not suggest a dual T5 as this would be more light than you need, and that is trouble. You are intending a low-tech or natural method planted tank, and too much light cannot be compensated by the duration.

    One comment on the fish mentioned, I would forget a Chinese Algae Eater. First, they get large, up to 5-6 inches, and they often become quite nasty to other fish. Plus they don't eat algae once they mature a bit. This is not a community fish.

    Byron.
    Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
    Vancouver, BC, Canada

    Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]

  9. Question


    0 Not allowed!
    Ok, back from a weekend trip.

    Thanks again for all the replies; they have been very informative.

    I can get another 10g easily. I thought it might be fun to get another small planted aquarium started first, but I was not able to get it out of storage for now. I will in the next few weeks, though.

    This looks like the light strip I have:
    http://www.drsfostersmith.com/produc...fm?pcatid=3803

    Single bulb, and it is a general purpose bulb. I was having issues with it when I took the tank down, so for simplicity's sake, I will just replace it. I have started to look around. I have a glass cover over the tank and then the wood canopy over it. Should I maybe get a dual bulb T5 and just use one, just to have the extra bulb capacity, if it is needed, or don't worry about it.

    As far as the CAE, I had one in the tank before with all community fish and he behaved himselff. He would protect his algae wafer, of course, but Spaz never grew over an inch and a half. I am sure I had the only well-behaved, never growing one before. :) I am still working on that list. Looking for a good piece of driftwood. The rock I had in the tank before is still in storage as well, so it might be a pretty sparse tank until I get some decorations.

    This weekend I should be able to get the tank up and water in it and start it cycling.

  10. #10

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I can get another 10g easily. I thought it might be fun to get another small planted aquarium started first, but I was not able to get it out of storage for now. I will in the next few weeks, though.
    Prevously you mentioned "small schools of fish" in a 10g. This is very little space, and most of the "common" fish are too large, thinking neons, harlequin rasbora and similar. Can pursue this if asked.

    This looks like the light strip I have:
    http://www.drsfostersmith.com/produc...fm?pcatid=3803

    Single bulb, and it is a general purpose bulb. I was having issues with it when I took the tank down, so for simplicity's sake, I will just replace it.
    It doesn't say at the link, but I'm fairly certain this was a T8 (regular fluorescent, not T5). A single tube willnot be sufficient light, so finding another light is a good idea.

    I have started to look around. I have a glass cover over the tank and then the wood canopy over it. Should I maybe get a dual bulb T5 and just use one, just to have the extra bulb capacity, if it is needed, or don't worry about it.
    Not all T5 fixtures allow just one of the two tubes to light. Depending what plants are intended, two T5 tubes may be too much, without CO2 and increased fertilization. We can review fixtures.

    As far as the CAE, I had one in the tank before with all community fish and he behaved himselff. He would protect his algae wafer, of course, but Spaz never grew over an inch and a half. I am sure I had the only well-behaved, never growing one before.
    I think it is safe to say this was not a Chinese Algae Eater. At 1 to 1.5 inches, sounds more like an otocinclus, a popular algae eating fish. A CAE would certainly grow much larger, unless it was stunted.
    Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
    Vancouver, BC, Canada

    Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •