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Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 29 of 29
  1. #21

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    0 Not allowed!
    Trim your hygrophila regularly and replant the cuttings in the gravel. You'll find it keeps the plant bushy and it will soon spread nicely. I've had great success with this plant (so long as you don't let it take over). Ludwiga Repens is an excellent addition too - although if you bought the plant as a red plant, be prepared for it to gradually turn green (it only stays red in the most intense light conditions).
    "Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known." Carl Sagan
    ~ My 350 Litre Tank Journal ~

  2. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Would triple T5 lighting not be intense enough?

    In terms of trimming the various plants I listed, is there a special technique to it?


    I am currently dosing the tank with 5ml of Flourish liquid fertilizer each week but I suspect that a lot of it is being absorbed by the activated carbon in my filters. Should the carbon be removed?
    Last edited by Richard Peche; 12-02-2013 at 05:57 PM.
    Learning as I go... and thanking everyone on this forum for their help, advice and patience!

  3. #23

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    0 Not allowed!
    no. the fertilizer and CO2 supplementation Talldutchie mentioned is not compensation, but
    needs to be increased to have a balance between your(fairly high) light, nurtrients and carbon dioxide levels in water.
    if you were to increase light without increasing nutrient supply or carbon dioxide, the plants still will be limited by the lowest factor and algae
    will take hold. Its somewhat like a chain being only as strong as its weakest link.
    Last edited by madagascariensis; 12-02-2013 at 06:26 PM.

  4. #24

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    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Peche View Post
    In terms of trimming the various plants I listed, is there a special technique to it?
    Just to answer this query, I do the following:

    For stem plants, never be tempted to just pinch them off with your fingernails. This bruises the stems and they won't regrow (or root) well from the pinched wounds. Always try to use a sharp pair of scissors. For my small tank I use little nail scissors which work very well. Cut the plant a bit shorter than you want it to grow to and cut the stem as close to the next set of leaves as possible (try not to leave stubby stems sticking up if you can). With the cut piece, trim off the lower leaves to allow you a clean stem for replanting. Where possible, use forceps or planting tongs to replant stems. This stops the stems being damaged as you push them into the substrate. When gripping the stem with tongs - ensure that the stem is aligned with the tongs and the end isn't exposed (i.e. you don't want the stem to do the pushing through the substrate, you want the tongs to push through with the stem safely between them slightly higher up). I'm not sure I've explained that adequately but I hope you get the idea.

    Grasses can be trimmed well...like grass (again - use some good sharp scissors; curved scissors can be very handy for this) and it will continue to grow at the base.

    Any plants with a rhizome can have leaves trimmed at the base (but these won't regrow without part of a rhizome attached so don't bother replanting like you do with stem plants). The anubia is the classic rhizome beginner plant. When they get too big you can just chop them in half at the rhizome base and re-attach the cut portion to another piece of rock/wood where necessary. Don't bury a rhizome or it will rot over time.

    Mosses can be trimmed like grass.

    Rosette plants will be fairly obvious as they will send runners off with new baby plants growing from them (like a spider plant). Cryptocoryne are rosette plants. They're easily pruned back at the base if necessary, and you can either leave the runners as they are or trim them off and replant the babies where you want them.

    I cannot advise on bulbs as I've never grown them.
    "Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known." Carl Sagan
    ~ My 350 Litre Tank Journal ~

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    0 Not allowed!
    What is this strange discolouration? I only noticed it today. Could it have been caused by the shift from one aquarium to another?

    DSC07842.jpg

    DSC07844.jpg
    Learning as I go... and thanking everyone on this forum for their help, advice and patience!

  6. #26

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    1 Not allowed!
    that is algae, most likely diatoms. they frequent new tanks and likely will go away with time.

  7. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    hey there I know i am a newbie too but i just couldn't sit back rofl. here is my pet peeve and a lot is due to what I always see in all places on the web when I was researching my plants.

    People talk about watts per gallon. I am sorry folks even though that may be working for you it is totally bogus information.

    WATTAGE is the power that the lights require to run it has absolutely squat to do with lighting. Yes the more watts the chance that the more light is produced but it is improper.

    Lighting uses what is called LUMENS as a measure of light intensity. now using just lumens isn't good enough. you see just like a lake or an ocean etc the intensity of a light diminishes every inch of depth it goes in water. so you must take that into account too.

    PAR is the lighting measure that gives the true measure of light in your aquarium. Read this link it will explain it better than I can. http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/sh...d.php?t=184368

    It also has collected data from testing and from other aquarium plant enthusiasts that have taken their measurements. there is a meter called a quantum par meter you can buy that will give you your levels but they have charts on that link page that has most all you need from testing. I have 2 48 inch T8 k6200 Grow lights sitting approx 22 inches off my substrate and that puts me in the 41 ish micromols which is in the lower middle half of the medium light spectrum which is fine for me as I dont want high lighting.

    so please guys read the article and stop using wattage for lighting as you are just guessing because wattage is a measure of electricity not light.

    Sorry guys I know a lot of ppl learned to use watts per gal but it really is just blind luck that it is working for you and you are probably spending way to much on lights when you can have the same lighting with less bulbs and fixtures.
    My Aquarium Journal
    http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/aqua...=1#post1186825

    4 Spotted Corys
    2 Peppered Corys
    3 Super Red Plecos
    10 Ghost Shrimp
    9 Black Skirt Tetra
    5 Long Fin Black Skirt Tetra
    6 Mickey Mouse Play
    1 Assassin Snail

    75 Gal Planted tank 65% stocked

  8. #28

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    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by madagascariensis View Post
    that is algae, most likely diatoms. they frequent new tanks and likely will go away with time.
    Agree. That looks like brown algae of some kind. Does it wipe off easily?
    "Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known." Carl Sagan
    ~ My 350 Litre Tank Journal ~

  9. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by ~firefly~ View Post
    Agree. That looks like brown algae of some kind. Does it wipe off easily?

    I have not tried but the Siamese Algae Eaters are nibbling on it.
    Learning as I go... and thanking everyone on this forum for their help, advice and patience!

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