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Results 11 to 20 of 29
  1. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Peche View Post
    Ideally I would like plants that will be fine with gravel and require lower light levels. Are there any that will be happy with the current 20W set-up?
    Nothing is going to grow with the current light. You will probably need about at least 60watts of lighting but more importantly you need the correct spectrum of light. For freshwater that is going to be the 6000k - 6500k light spectrum. This is what the plants will need. Now if you want inexpensive not so pretty lights you can go to a local hardware store and get some clamp on lights and a couple CFL light bulbs in that spectrum. I did that on a nursery tank I was experimenting with to grow out some of my cuttings.

    I have grown crypts in gravel. they did ok you will definitely have to use root tabs to fertilize them. Anubias and java ferns can be planted in gravel as ling as the rhizome is not buried but you can tie them to wood or rocks as well.
    Mike
    120g Mixed Reef In Progress
    120g Reef Journal
    55g Freshwater - Out of Service
    My 55g Tank Remodel Project
    72g Bowfront -Out of Service

  2. #12

    Default


    1 Not allowed!
    I'll try to pick up the several issues and questions raised since my last post. First on the light, no, T8 and T5 tubes need different fixtures. Personally I would not get T5, unless it is a single tube; the HO tubes are much more intense light than the T8 in the same type, and it is easy to turn the tank into algae soup. We can look at the lighting separately, as you don't want to waste money. The intended fish will factor into this; and give us the tank dimensions and the stats on the existing light fixture(s). We may be able to suggest better tubes alone.

    To the fish. All male gourami are territorial, very similar to all cichlids. This is part of their inherent nature. Why a particular fish is more docile than the majority is something we don't really know, but it does happen. However, it is also often the case that fish put together may be fine for several weeks and even months, then suddenly things go bad. The fish becomes "normal" and starts flexing its muscles, so to speak. When this happens, it can devistate the entire tank in a few days. It is always wise to assume the fish will be normal, rather than hope it won't.

    Pearl Gourami are more peaceful than the Blue Gourami. And recognize that the Blue Gourami has several colour variants--Gold, Cosby, Three-spot, Opaline--these are all the same species, Trichogaster trichopterus. This species is a bit rougher, and won't hesitate to eat smallish fish. I was in a local store one day, and noticed neon tetra in with this gourami. I was just thinking how unwise this match was, when three of the gourami quickly surrounded a neon and it was gone in seconds. Pearls are less likely to do this.

    Species of gourami should generally not be combined unless the tank is very large. And here I am thinking of the more commonly-seen gourami, like the pearls, blue/gold, dwarf, etc. And there should be a ratio of one male with 2-3 females. The very small and much rarer species are a bit different, depending, but one still has to be careful as the males will establish territories and defend them against other gourami.

    Other factors that play into fish behaviour are the tank size, other fish species (both the actual species and the numbers of fish), and the environment meaning the decor, water parameters, etc.

    I still say get rid of the clown loach and SAE soon. The loach must have others, this is harming this fish. The SAE will change, as you already witnessed. Sometimes this can occur sooner rather than later. Avoidng risk in this hobby is a key to success.
    Last edited by Byron; 10-30-2013 at 03:58 PM.

  3. #13

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by Byron View Post
    I'll try to pick up the several issues and questions raised since my last post. First on the light, no, T8 and T5 tubes need different fixtures. Personally I would not get T5, unless it is a single tube; the HO tubes are much more intense light than the T8 in the same type, and it is easy to turn the tank into algae soup. We can look at the lighting separately, as you don't want to waste money. The intended fish will factor into this; and give us the tank dimensions and the stats on the existing light fixture(s). We may be able to suggest better tubes alone.
    I love T5HO! Of course it does mean feeding your plants properly. I got a twin T5 on my tank, it's definitely not algae soup and I'm looking into getting some reflectors to increase the yield.

  4. #14

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by talldutchie View Post
    I love T5HO! Of course it does mean feeding your plants properly. I got a twin T5 on my tank, it's definitely not algae soup and I'm looking into getting some reflectors to increase the yield.
    You know what you are doing. As I would. We understand balance. On my last forum, I resolved dozens of poor plant growth/increasing algae issues where the person had twin-tube T5 HO lighting and it was too intense.

    I had to replace a fixture a couple of years back, a T8 that gave out. I got a T5 taking two 48-inch HO tubes. This was way too bright over the intended 70g (4 foot length) tank, so I put it over my 4-foot 90g thinking the deeper tank would be OK. But no, so I moved it over my 5-foot 115g tank and it was still way too bright. I kidded that the poor fish would be asking me for sunglasses. I left this on the 115g for a week, then seeing it was just too much light, took it back for a twin-tube T8. This is all the light I need for what I have in the tanks, plant-wise, and they all have a good cover of floating plants as well.

    Byron.

  5. #15

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    PErhaps that's the advantage of buying an aquarium kit with lights, you know it will not be overdone

  6. #16

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by talldutchie View Post
    PErhaps that's the advantage of buying an aquarium kit with lights, you know it will not be overdone
    Then the problem is the reverse, too weak light. But one can always buy a good tube to improve things a bit.

    But it has to all work together, as you well know. I have low and moderate-light requiring plants, and I won't even consider trying high light plants like the stem plants (except for Pennywort which does fine) because I've learned through trial and error that they won't manage. I went down this path because I didn't want over-bright light for my fish. All my tanks have floating plants as well. I've stayed with what works in my situation.

    Byron.
    Last edited by Byron; 10-30-2013 at 10:09 PM.

  7. #17

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I've even seen a few layouts recently with low T8 light, a ton of wood and just amazon frogbit.

  8. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Right, I apologise for the very late reply guys but I had other commitments regarding my studies.

    I have since replaced this 180l tank with a 260l tank. The dimensions are 102L x 46H x 42W (cm). This was not intentional I admit but it had to happen as the previous aquarium suddenly cracked on Saturday morning.

    This new tank came with 3 T5 lights which are a far-cry from my old T8.

    Oddly enough, the move to this tank has prompted my Ancistrus to breed :). So here's hoping that it is successful.

    The tank has an internal filter system in the lid but for the moment I am going to run my C700 Dolphin canister as well. I would rather be safe than sorry since I was only able to move across some 80l from the old tank.


    I also checked the names of the plants I currently have in the tank:
    Ludwiga Repens
    Bacopa Monieri
    Hygrophila Lacuslris
    Hygrophila Polysperma.
    Learning as I go... and thanking everyone on this forum for their help, advice and patience!

  9. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    DSC07707.JPG

    This is the new tank. I copied the setup from the previous tank but spaced it out more.
    Learning as I go... and thanking everyone on this forum for their help, advice and patience!

  10. #20

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I'd say let it grown in and replant any new shoots. With this much light a regular dosing with a good general fertilizer as well as light dosage with liquid carbon is probably a good idea.

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