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Results 1 to 10 of 16
  1. Default Filter Media.... What's best


    0 Not allowed!
    Hey All
    I've been at this more seriously for almost a year and a half now with my 90 gallon tank

    I've learned that Charcoal / filter carbon is pretty much a waste unless you are trying to remove something like meds or similar.

    I have A lot of filtration and I use floss, a variety of filter pads both course and porous , sponges, ceramic rings and bio balls.

    I have 2 Aqua clear filters (big ones) hooked up to an undergravel setup up and a canister filter as well . .... My question is what's best for BB bacteria .... Adding those big porous sponges or ceramic rings? Or is a mix of both best?

    Either one any better than the other??

    Many times with the way I use floss and those blue thin filter sheets on the bottom of the filters my sponges or ceramic rings never get dirty. Almost all the dirt is caught in the floss...

    Thoughts..comments...?

  2. #2

    Default


    1 Not allowed!
    Sponges are mainly used as mechanical filtration. Porous ceramic media and/or bioballs are where most of the beneficial bacteria will colonize. A combination of the two is best for overall filtration. If your sponges are not getting dirty, you can replace some of htem with more ceramic media if you want to.

    Liters to Gallons conversion calculator

    "Keeping fish for any period of time doesn't make you experienced if you're doing it wrong. What does, is acknowledging those mistakes and learning from them." ~Aeonflame
    "
    your argument is invalid." ~Mommy1


  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    3,783

    Awards Showcase

    Why thank-you - Cliff The grammar crab has you in its grasp! D: - Trillianne Thanks for the clarification - Mith A few clown for the fellow SW clowns. :D - ILuvMyGoldBarb sorry about your angelfish - smaug 
    Many cultures donw through the ages have known that Ice cream is the perfect band-aid for all occasions. ~  Sorry for your loss. - 850R Here's some Christmass Cheer, Happy Holidays Sheamurai - Cliff merry xmas, keep good care of him - genocidex Beer! The perfect gift for any occasion - Merry Chrismas! - 850R I'm glad your here and a active forum member - Cliff 
    penguin for a friend XD - genocidex Thanks for the help with that spammer !!! - Cliff Thank you for the kind words - Cliff Merry Christmas - Cliff To help you re-stock the tank - Cliff 
    Discus and Beer! - Sandz To Discus Days!!! - JudiJetson For very clear advice! - houdini56 Happy Holidays! - Rue Happy Easter! - Slaphppy7 

    Default


    2 Not allowed!
    I personally lean to a mix of the coarse sponges and the ceramic rings for bio-media. I find them the easiest to rinse, but I have no way of knowing which of all the options actually houses more BB. If your bio media is not getting dirty, and your water parameters are good, well, if it ain't broke, don't fix it?

  4. #4

    Default


    1 Not allowed!
    Agree, don't mess with success! Any substrate will be colonized by bacteria. The only difference in media (from a bacteriological standpoint) is the surface area of the media available for bacterial colonization.

    So, any substrate is good for bacteria, as long as it's large enough in surface area to serve your tank's bioload demand. Remember, lots and lots of bacteria also are in you substrate and covering every surface in the tank itself. The next consideration is cleaning ease and water flow-through. I like the small ceramic "globes" that come with Eheim filters, but any brand is good. They are a pain to clean (I lose some down the sink occasionally) and a sponge/blue floss is a lot easier to pull/rotate a couple out for cleaning, but my sponges also clog a bit and develop biofilms (heavily planted tanks and plant detritus) which reduces my filter flow significantly over time.

  5. #5

    Default


    2 Not allowed!
    I've always used as much biological filter media (bio-max) as possible along with sponges. That way I never had to become dependent on the substrate or plants as a part of the tank's filtration.
    If you take your time to do the research FIRST, you can successfully set-up and keep ANY type of aquarium with ease.
    "Not using a quarantine tank is like playing Russian roulette. Nobody wins the game, some people just get to play longer than others." - Anthony Calfo
    Fishless Cycle Cycling with Fish Marine Aquarium Info [URL="http://saltwater.aquaticcommunity.com/"]

  6. #6

    Default


    1 Not allowed!
    There seems to be misunderstanding within the hobby on filtration. As DKRST pointed out, the nitrifying bacteria will establish and exist in any aquarium at the level needed to handle the available ammonia/nitrite, whether you have no filter, one filter or 10 filters. Filters in this sense make no difference to biological filtration.

    Obviously, the initial nitrifying bacteria and then the subsequent nitrifying archaea will usually be highest in the filter. This is because the larger flow of water through the filter is bringing the ammonia/nitrite into closer and more rapid contact with oxygen and the media. But this goes no further. Adding more media or more filters--assuming the existing filter/media is sufficient to handle the bioload--will not benefit the nitrification cycle simply because it cannot. The level of ammonia and nitrite in the aquarium will determine the level of bacteria/archaea that will colonize. If ammonia/nitrite increases, the bacteria/archaea will increase proportionally; if the ammonia/nitrite decreases, the bacteria/archaea will shut down. We used to think they they actually died off, but it is not so certain now that this occurs, at least not for some time. A lot of new data on bacteria/archaea has been discovered during the past few years that seriously questions some of the long-standing ideas/myths about them.

    Byron.

  7. #7

    Default


    1 Not allowed!
    I do not think there is a miss-under standing here Byron. Just different approaches to setting up and maintaining a healthy aquarium with enough beneficial bacteria to make this happen.

    The OP ask which filter media would be best, so I think most of us were answer that question in mind and making suggestions to help the OP grow as much beneficial bacteria as possible plus allow for future growth and the fish grow or stocking levels change. This common approach can offer a simpler and more flexible solution to filtration for most people.
    If you take your time to do the research FIRST, you can successfully set-up and keep ANY type of aquarium with ease.
    "Not using a quarantine tank is like playing Russian roulette. Nobody wins the game, some people just get to play longer than others." - Anthony Calfo
    Fishless Cycle Cycling with Fish Marine Aquarium Info [URL="http://saltwater.aquaticcommunity.com/"]

  8. #8

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by Cliff View Post
    I do not think there is a miss-under standing here Byron. Just different approaches to setting up and maintaining a healthy aquarium with enough beneficial bacteria to make this happen.

    The OP ask which filter media would be best, so I think most of us were answer that question in mind and making suggestions to help the OP grow as much beneficial bacteria as possible plus allow for future growth and the fish grow or stocking levels change. This common approach can offer a simpler and more flexible solution to filtration for most people.
    This still seems a bit confusing. I am not understanding how one can make beneficial bacteria grow faster with different media...the rate of colonization is solely dependent upon the amount of ammonia/nitrite. It is true that it likely colonizes bio media first, due to the increased oxygen/ammonia as I mentioned previously. But it can only appear and multiply at a specific rate, no matter what filter media there is.

    There is more bacteria throughout the tank than in the filter, here considering all types of bacteria/archaea, and the non-nitrifying types are just as important to the overall health of the system.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    3,783

    Awards Showcase

    Why thank-you - Cliff The grammar crab has you in its grasp! D: - Trillianne Thanks for the clarification - Mith A few clown for the fellow SW clowns. :D - ILuvMyGoldBarb sorry about your angelfish - smaug 
    Many cultures donw through the ages have known that Ice cream is the perfect band-aid for all occasions. ~  Sorry for your loss. - 850R Here's some Christmass Cheer, Happy Holidays Sheamurai - Cliff merry xmas, keep good care of him - genocidex Beer! The perfect gift for any occasion - Merry Chrismas! - 850R I'm glad your here and a active forum member - Cliff 
    penguin for a friend XD - genocidex Thanks for the help with that spammer !!! - Cliff Thank you for the kind words - Cliff Merry Christmas - Cliff To help you re-stock the tank - Cliff 
    Discus and Beer! - Sandz To Discus Days!!! - JudiJetson For very clear advice! - houdini56 Happy Holidays! - Rue Happy Easter! - Slaphppy7 

    Default


    4 Not allowed!
    When I talk about housing more BB, I personally just mean which may have more surface area for BB to colonise...any population is controlled by the amount of food available to it...but I think we can agree that a smooth peice of rock will have a lower surface area for BB to colonise than a filter full of ceramic rings...hence given ample food for two maximum populations to grow, the one in the filter will be bigger than the one on the smooth rock.

  10. #10

    Default


    2 Not allowed!
    Now I'm confused Byron. How did we end up talking the speed at which bacteria grows ? I have made no comments about growth rates of bacteria anywhere. I've read this thread again I'm I'm not seeing that anywhere.

    As you have pointed out bacteria growth with be determine by the conditions it is in (temp, food, oxygen, flow.... and so on) which not be effected by the surface it grows on. The type of media used in the filter can determine the amount of bacteria grown as some are a lot better than others. I am only commenting on how to grow the largest amount bacteria inside a filter based the type of media used, which is what the OP asked.
    If you take your time to do the research FIRST, you can successfully set-up and keep ANY type of aquarium with ease.
    "Not using a quarantine tank is like playing Russian roulette. Nobody wins the game, some people just get to play longer than others." - Anthony Calfo
    Fishless Cycle Cycling with Fish Marine Aquarium Info [URL="http://saltwater.aquaticcommunity.com/"]

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