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Results 1 to 10 of 16
  1. Default Brown Algae - Should I add some floating plants


    0 Not allowed!
    OK question about brown somewhat fuzzy algae. It seems I have been battling this for a while in both tanks it is not horrible but a bit annoying. A lot of you have planted tanks and they stay so clean I don't know how you do it. I do regular maint and have the lights on timers for about 7hrs a day. I don't overfeed and I don't always feed daily. I have the same 108watt light on both tanks. Is it too much(bright) light? I was thinking if that was the case I could add some floating plants like Amazon Frogbit or Giant Salvinia to cut down.

    Especially for my 72g since I am thinking of consolidating the two tanks. It has a coast to coast overflow I built so it has good flow but it is not turbulent. I will need a larger floater so as not to get dumped into the overflow.
    Mike
    120g Mixed Reef In Progress
    120g Reef Journal
    55g Freshwater - Out of Service
    My 55g Tank Remodel Project
    72g Bowfront -Out of Service

  2. #2

    Default


    1 Not allowed!
    Those brown diatoms are common in new aquariums. Excess silicates and phosphates are usually the cause of it in new tanks. Other than being unsightly, it isn't harmful, just keep doing water changes to get rid of it. It will go away usually a few weeks after the aquarium has been set up.

  3. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Korith, this is not a new tank. Just seems odd that it would be diatoms.
    Mike
    120g Mixed Reef In Progress
    120g Reef Journal
    55g Freshwater - Out of Service
    My 55g Tank Remodel Project
    72g Bowfront -Out of Service

  4. #4

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Possibly cause could be the tap water then, high in silicates. How long have you been dealing with them? From how you described sounded like brown diatoms to me. Take a look on google for brown diatoms aquarium, and see if the images look familiar to the stuff in your tank?

  5. #5

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I would suggest from your description of "fuzzy" that this is not diatoms, but a form of brush algae. Strictly speaking, this algae is red, but it can occur in several forms that to me anyway can appear to be black, very dark brown, reddish-brown and even dark green-gray. It can be fairly large tufts or a very small (in height) covering on leaves.

    It is, like all red and green algae, due to light and nutrients. The reason some planted tanks have none, or appear to, is because we find the balance between light and nutrients. This can take some experimenting, since it depends upon several factors such as the light intensity, spectrum and duration, plus the organics and nutrients which involves the fish (type and numbers and feedings) and source water, plus the plant species and numbers.

    With 108 watts, I will guess that this is fluorescent T5 HO lighting? If so, that is a lot of intensity. If therer are two tubes, can you have just one light without the second lit? This would make a dent in the algae as it would be easier to balance. Without knowing exactly what the light is, and what fertilization you may be doing, plus the plants, I can't offer much more. Other than to say, yes, floating plants also help. But if the light is too intense, this on its own may not be sufficient.

    Byron.

  6. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Yes you are correct 2 t-5 HO for fresh water. I really do not fert much. I use fert tabs occasionally for the rooted plants 3 months or so but less than the recommended dosage. I also use Excel and Flourish after a PWC. here are a couple of pics.
    **edit - Yes toward the top of the tank it does take on a more reddish tint





    Mike
    120g Mixed Reef In Progress
    120g Reef Journal
    55g Freshwater - Out of Service
    My 55g Tank Remodel Project
    72g Bowfront -Out of Service

  7. #7

    Default


    1 Not allowed!
    Thanks for the photos, Mike; as always, they speak volumes. And this is definitely brush algae, so that is settled.

    The light is too intense for everything else; with this much intensity you will need to be on a more high-tech method, which means adding diffused CO2 and perhaps daily nutrients. I never go down this road, I like the opposite, of staying low-tech, natural and simple. So with this in mind, back to my original question, can you have just one tube light?

    I realize you are adding liquid carbon, in the form of Excel. This often kills brush algae, interestingly. [Seachem have told me they do not know why exactly, but they do not like to suggest it because it doesn't always do the trick.] But there are downsides to Excel that i believe are quite serious, and I will never use this. It is made of glutaraldehyde and water; Seachem I see are now calling the chemical pentanedial which from my brief search seems to be much the same thing, or a variant. Anyway, it will kill some plants outright even at their recommended dosage (Vallisneria and some mosses seem particularly sensitive), and if overdosed has the capacity to kill plants, fish and bacteria. Glutaraldehyde is after all a strong disinfectant used in hospitals to sterilize instruments, in embalming fluid, in antifreeze...you get the idea. I personally won't put this in my fish tanks.

    Flourish Comprehensive Supplement is an excellent complete liquid fertilzer; I have been using it for over five years now, once weekly. However, it is intended as a supplement in low-tech method planted tanks, as we are discussing, but is insufficient to balance the light intensity here.

    Another aspect of all this is the water changes. The more you change, the less this algae will be troublesome, though this too has limits. But it is another factor in the balance. If you can let me know your water change schedule (volume and frequency) plus the light single tube issue, I can probably provide more.

    Byron.

  8. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Thanks Byron.

    I don't know if I can just run one bulb in my light. I make about a 25% PWC weekly albeit have been a bit lax recently due to renovations to the house. The problem existed prior to that though. Thats why I wondered if the floaters might be a good way to naturally cut back on the light. The same problem exists in my 55g but I am considering moving that stock into the 72 along with the plants.
    Mike
    120g Mixed Reef In Progress
    120g Reef Journal
    55g Freshwater - Out of Service
    My 55g Tank Remodel Project
    72g Bowfront -Out of Service

  9. #9

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    It's not diatoms, those pictures show that. Byron made some good suggestions. I've used excel to spot treat algae on plants before. For the algae on the rocks/wood, probably easier to remove from tank and scrub it down. You could get some sae, some do eat various types of algae, though really need to eliminate the cause of the algae.

  10. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I don't mind it on the wood so much as I do on the plants. It would be a major undertaking to pull the wood. It is all screwed to slate and buried in the substrate. I would be happy if I could keep it at bay on the plants. I definitely like the look of a natural scape. My ottos certainly have plenty to eat.
    Mike
    120g Mixed Reef In Progress
    120g Reef Journal
    55g Freshwater - Out of Service
    My 55g Tank Remodel Project
    72g Bowfront -Out of Service

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