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Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. Default Sump questions - CO2, noise, evaporation


    0 Not allowed!
    Hi everyone,

    I just setup my first 55 gallon (upgrade from a 30 gallon), and though I'm running it as freshwater, it is a Deep Sea pre-drilled with an overflow. I have a sump setup under the tank in the stand, a custom acrylic (so it would fit in the narrow stand). Being this is the first time running a sump, I have a few questions. :)

    Evaporation: The sump has one covered section (where the water first enters), where the filter floss and bioballs are. The next section is open (to put equipment in), and the last section is open (where the return pump is). I am noticing evaporation is putting moisture (lots) on the inside of the stand and am wondering about future breakdown of the stand, rust on the hinges, etc. What do most people do about this? Cover all sections of the sump? Something else?

    Noise: I've been reading up on the water flow/drain noise, and read that if you adjust (something) you can hit a "sweet spot" where it's quiet. What do I need to adjust? This has the standard corner in-tank overflow, with a piece of plastic you can slide up or down to cover the holes/raise the level that drains into the overflow. Help. :)

    Noise 2: From the pump. I was thinking of getting a rubber mat to go under it to reduce vibration. Would that work? It's the hum of the pump I am trying to quiet.

    CO2: On my old tank I had been running DIY CO2 directly into the tank. I am wondering about putting it into the sump, either in the middle open section or the last open section with the return pump, to hide the equipment and have it all in the stand. Would that cause too much CO2 loss by the time it gets to the tank? Has anyone done this?

    Thank you!

  2. #2

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    There are a few different ways to reduce noise based on how you have the plumbing set up to drain into your sump. Without know more about how the sump and drain lines are set-up, I can't really offer much useable advice. However, the below two links will explains things a little better for you. They are based on marine set-ups, but the same approaches will apply to your set-up as water is still water (fresh or salt)

    http://www.reefaquarium.com/2012/some-sump-basics/

    http://www.reefaquarium.com/2012/aqu...umbing-basics/

    You can make a DIY cover for your sump out of any type of plastic material if you want to cut down on evaporation. Sounds like your sump is sitting inside a enclosed stand which could explain the moisture. Just double check and make sure the water is actually evaporation and not a leak coming from the tank or plumbing.

    I could not see any reason why you could not run CO2 into your sump. Just make sure you add the CO2 line into the first or second compartment as you do not want these bubbles getting sucked into the return pump.
    If you take your time to do the research FIRST, you can successfully set-up and keep ANY type of aquarium with ease.
    "Not using a quarantine tank is like playing Russian roulette. Nobody wins the game, some people just get to play longer than others." - Anthony Calfo
    Fishless Cycle Cycling with Fish Marine Aquarium Info [URL="http://saltwater.aquaticcommunity.com/"]

  3. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    The only thing you'll want to worry about is surface agitation after the CO2 is diffused, either in the sump itself or in the return process. You also might look at fabricating some sort of inline reactor in the return.

  4. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Hi,

    Thanks for the link and information. I am pretty new to this, so unfortunately I am not sure how to apply it to my setup to understand what I need to adjust or change to reduce the noise. I would like to learn, though! I have some photos attached that may help, of the standpipes, water level of the overflow and main tank, overflow box openings where the water drains in (these are set at half the height possible), and the sump and lines under the stand. If any other photos or measurements would be helpful to know, let me know and I can do that.

    The pump is a Via-Aqua 2600, which lists a flow rate of 740 gph and 3/4" intake. I have a check valve on the return but no valves on the intake. The sump is 30"l x14"h x9"w, and the water level is 9" high in the sump right now.

    There is a big drop into the overflow (the people building my sump lowered the standpipes in the overflow box at the same time...not sure why). I put filter sponge between the overflow wall and standpipes to soften the drop of the water there.

    The filter sponge in the return part of the sump is to buffer the noise where the hoses were resting on the sump and causing vibration. The pump itself is also sitting on a sandbag.

    The loudest sound is the drain/flushing sound of water, with some bubbling sounds. There is also a hum noise from the pump.

    Thanks for any help!
    Attached Images Attached Images

  5. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by Zerileous View Post
    The only thing you'll want to worry about is surface agitation after the CO2 is diffused, either in the sump itself or in the return process. You also might look at fabricating some sort of inline reactor in the return.
    Hi, yes, an inline reactor is probably the most straight-forward. I'm a little hesitant to change plumbing (new to this), but am wondering about putting it in the second compartment before the return and seeing if it works. Then putting it in the tank, and seeing if there's a difference. Being able to have everything in the sump would be great.

  6. #6

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Your pic did not clearly show this, but based only on your description, it sounds like you have a duriso stand pipe that was made too short. If you increase the height of the pipe so the top fitting is level with the water level in the tank, you will get rid of the water falling noise as you will now have the level in both compartments the same. If you still have a gurgling noise, then you have too much or too little air flow into the line. A simple adjust to the air flow will make it completely noise free. The link I post above explains how to do this. You can also search for videos on youtube about duriso stand pipes to help understand this better

    I would not suggest using an in-line CO2 reactor on your sump return line. These are designed to be used on canister filter hoses and they will not easily work on SHC 40 PVC lines like you have on your sump (based on your pics). You could make it with a series of adaptors, but that would most likely be more work than what it is worth.

    Just a tip for the future, if you resize your pics to 800 X 800 pixels before posting them, you will avoid getting a very wide thread like this making it a lot easier to read
    If you take your time to do the research FIRST, you can successfully set-up and keep ANY type of aquarium with ease.
    "Not using a quarantine tank is like playing Russian roulette. Nobody wins the game, some people just get to play longer than others." - Anthony Calfo
    Fishless Cycle Cycling with Fish Marine Aquarium Info [URL="http://saltwater.aquaticcommunity.com/"]

  7. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Hi, thanks. I didn't know about the picture re-sizing. :) That will help with reading next time.

    Yea, I can try to take another pic without the reflection so you can see the duriso standpipe level and the water level between the main tank and overflow. Putting the filter sponge between the overflow and the pipe, though a make-shift solution, did seem to eliminate that noise (at least I can't hear it over the drain/air flow noise at the moment). I am not sure from the post how to raise the standpipe once it's already made...I'll try to read again.

    So it looks like I will need to try to figure out how to adjust the air flow. I will re-read the post and try to sound out what I'm thinking of doing here, just to make sure I get the right idea before I start working on it. Thanks!
    Last edited by SamandAnne; 10-19-2013 at 03:32 PM.

  8. #8

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Stand pipes should not be glued together so you can just take it apart pc by pc. You can replace the vertical pc with a longer one to increase the hight to match the waterline in the tank. To adjust the airflow (after you have the hight corrected), you have three options, 1- make a adjustable air hole in your current standpipe and seal off the air hole you currently have (my preferred option - link below), 2 - add a air line to the cap with a valve on the other end to adjust the air, or, 3 - replace the cap with one that has several very very small hole so you can block them one by one until the correct air flow is getting through. However, if all this plumbing stuff is pretty new to you, I would suggest spending a lot of time finding some good youtube videos as well.

    http://www.dursostandpipes.com/popul...e-modification
    If you take your time to do the research FIRST, you can successfully set-up and keep ANY type of aquarium with ease.
    "Not using a quarantine tank is like playing Russian roulette. Nobody wins the game, some people just get to play longer than others." - Anthony Calfo
    Fishless Cycle Cycling with Fish Marine Aquarium Info [URL="http://saltwater.aquaticcommunity.com/"]

  9. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Thank you. After I posted I looked at the standpipe and was able to pull it up some...there is now a 2" drop between the main tank and the overflow. So, your recommendation would be to replace the straight, upright piece with something 2" higher...so the water level in the overflow and tank are the same. And then, after that, work on what would adjust the air flow? Right now the air hole is 1/4".

    I am leaning toward trying the air hose for now, which I can do right away. Then, when I can get a new standpipe in, I can adjust the air hose and valve again to the new height, and it won't be so permanent (and I am new and am afraid of messing things up with drilling).

    Hopefully that will take care of water and air flow noise. I will re-post when its done to let you know. Do you have any experience with motor hum and/or vibration noise, too, by any chance?

    Thanks!

  10. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Hi,

    I found some mini-airline hosing that fit in the hole already drilled in my durso standpipe. That helped to reduce the noise a lot. Also, I discovered that my intake hose was curved "uphill" slightly from the 90-degree PVC elbow before dropping down to the sump. You can see this from the last two photos, but I hadn't noticed it before. I moved the sump itself a little further from the PVC elbow (making it farther from the pipe to the sump) so that it straightened out, and that helped the turbulent air/water noise, too.

    Now that all that noise is reduced, I can really hear the flow from the main tank into the overflow. I can't seem to remove the vertical PVC part of the standpipe (white in photo) to replace it with something taller. I also have a glass lid on the tank, and the top piece of the durso standpipe (black in photo) just fits under the glass lid with the height it is now. The only thing I can think of (and I'm open to any suggestions!) is to find a durso standpipe that is shorter. This part is shaped like an "h", with the highest part of the "h" having a drilled hole in it. Is it possible to find a piece of PVC that is shaped like an "n", (with a shorter piece above the curve) and still drill a hole in the top to let air in? If so, what would that be called? I'm thinking the drop from the tank to the overflow would be at least an inch, and maybe quieter.

    Or any other thoughts on how to make the overflow from tank to corner box less?

    I was reading over this post again and didn't thank you enough for all the information already provided!
    55 gallon planted - Fish & Shrimp - Pair of Gold Rams, albino bristlenose plecos, school of neon tetras, school of praecox dwarf neon rainbowfish, australe orange killifish, yellow kimono killifish, amano shrimp, bamboo shrimp, and a cherry shrimp colony. Plants - Dwarf baby tears, vals, guppy grass, moss, narrow-leafed java fern, amazon swords, anubias, and crypts

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