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Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. Default Stopping Fin Nipping in Glo Tetras?


    0 Not allowed!
    Yesterday I asked a question regarding ICK on my Glo-Tetras (similar to black skirt tetras- sold at chain pet stores), and received great advice from the members of this forum.

    Today while examining my the tank and seeing how the treatment was going I noticed that one of the tetra had the tail fin nipped at. There are currently six tetras in my 10 gal tank (this is only temporary while my 42 gal completes its cycle (about 2 weeks left)). All of the tetras are the same size and where purchased from the same tank at the pet store, so my question whether I can expect this nipping to continue once they are in the main tank? Is there any way to remedy this problem, or is isolation of the culprit/victim the only way to go?

    I didn't realize that aggression could happen if all of the tetras were the same size and they seemed to be fine in the tank at the pet store.

    Not to mention could this possibly be why the fish came down with ICK in the first place, being stressed out by the aggressor of the school then followed by nipping?

    Thanks for any advice or info regarding this matter

  2. #2

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Have you actually seen this fish get its tail nipped? Could it be fin rot? It might help to google fin rot and compare pics online with what you see on this fish.

    Recently I saw bettas in a chain store - many of them looked quite ragged (because of how they are kept prior to purchase) and one of them had obvious fin rot - but I don't know what your fish's tail looks like either.
    46 gal fw tank with black skirt tetras, neon tetras, spotted corys, cherry barbs, otoclinus, snails & 4 amano shrimp - plastic & live plants
    5 gal QT
    Remember: Our job is to take care of the water our fish live in

  3. #3

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    imma24 is correct on possible fin rot, but given the info I would suspect fin nipping first.

    Characins, to which group tetra belong, are shoaling fish. To varying degrees, all species are interactive within their large group, and many species do show a penchant to fin nip. This can be brought on by environmental factors such as tank size, aquascaping, and other fish in the tank. It is also closely connected to the number of fish of the species itself.

    The Glo Tetra is a colour form of the Black Widow or Black Skirt Tetra, Gymnocorymbus ternetzi. This is a species that has a fairly strong penchant for nipping fins and is easily coaxed by any of the afore-mentioned factors. It should never be combined with sedate fish (angelfish, cichlids, gourami, etc) for this reason. But it also needs space and perhaps higher numbers.

    The 42g will solve the space issue. If this is insufficient on its own, adding 3 more fish may work. However, once a fish starts nipping, it is not necessarily going to just stop. It may, but it may not. [This is one reason why I also suggest acquiring shoaling fish at one time, rather than a few now and a few later. I only mention this because some new aquarists worry about overloading the tank and think 3 fish now, 3 next week is better; but for shoaling fish this can be a big mistake.]

    Ich is brought on by stress as you correctly mention. Fish go through incredible stress getting to our tanks; along the way they have to deal with often terrible water conditions, varying water parameters, lack of food, overcrowding, transport...considering all this, it is something of a marvel that they make it at all. Being confined to an aquatic environment creates considerable issues for fish that no other animal has, because of the fish's physiology which connects them so closely with the water. It is more likely that stress started the fin nipping and ich simultaneously.

    Byron.
    Last edited by Byron; 10-14-2013 at 06:01 PM.
    Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
    Vancouver, BC, Canada

    Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]

  4. #4

    Default


    1 Not allowed!
    Any schools of tetra's can be nippy. Up the school to 15 or 20 once they get moved to the larger tank and you should not have any more problems and why they got along better at the store. There was probably more in the tank with them. Just possible you ended up with a female that is being chased by a group of fella's, too.

    Don't be in a rush to stop the treatment for ick, either. When you don't see the white spots on the fish, they have simply fallen off and are hatching new ones on the bottom. I'd give it an extra 10 days to play it safe. And never pour store water in your tanks. Pour the fish in a net and drop them in the tank.

  5. Default


    1 Not allowed!
    Thank you guys for the info. I have all seem increased activity in the tetras with ick, only about three days into heat treatment. I will definitely continue the 10 days after no more white dots on fish.

    After the 10 days are up, should i vaccum the gravel bed to get rid of any remaining eggs/spots, or is the heat enough to kill off the remaining parasites?

  6. #6

    Default


    1 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by fishkeeper82 View Post
    Thank you guys for the info. I have all seem increased activity in the tetras with ick, only about three days into heat treatment. I will definitely continue the 10 days after no more white dots on fish.

    After the 10 days are up, should i vaccum the gravel bed to get rid of any remaining eggs/spots, or is the heat enough to kill off the remaining parasites?
    I would vacuum up eggs before the 10days are up - the more you get rid of, the less there are to jump back onto a fish once they hatch.
    46 gal fw tank with black skirt tetras, neon tetras, spotted corys, cherry barbs, otoclinus, snails & 4 amano shrimp - plastic & live plants
    5 gal QT
    Remember: Our job is to take care of the water our fish live in

  7. #7

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by fishkeeper82 View Post

    After the 10 days are up, should i vaccum the gravel bed to get rid of any remaining eggs/spots, or is the heat enough to kill off the remaining parasites?
    I would vac daily if possible.

  8. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Ok i just didn't want to stress the fish anymore by siphon vaccuming the gravel. Since it will be good to remove the eggs i will definitely start doing it. Thanks again, I definitely would be lost without this forum and its knowledgible members!

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